Live a Little, Love a Little (1968) Poster

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Nolan is here with the truth...
Shane Paterson6 July 2002
And the truth is that this is a good film. It's a very atypical film, as were all of Elvis' last few scripted movies in one way or another. Actually, it's a somewhat weird film, and probably the most unusual that Elvis did in terms of being 'out there' a way. It wasn't even released in the UK -- if so, it's a pity, because people who'd finally grown tired of the '60s musicals might have found redeeming value in this one.

Here we have Elvis playing an adult for one of the few times in his career, complete with more coarse language than he'd been given before, a lot more innuendo, and even a bed-sharing with his female co-star. It's an interesting piece and one that was largely missed by many as Elvis' '60s film formula began to lose its successful appeal around the time of "Easy Come, Easy Go," "Clambake," and "Speedway." Elvis himself was probably more interested by this point in projects more dear to him -- the legendary 1968 television special , announced a couple of months before shooting began on this movie, was shot three months after this film. He'd also recently returned to the studio with new vigor to produce some excellent non-soundtrack songs . Still, he does a great job in his role as a news and fashion photographer and manages to squeeze in a great knock-down, drag-out fight with a couple of men (played by bodyguards Red and Sonny West, two-thirds of the 'insiders' who contributed to a 1977 tell-all book that broke the dying king's heart...nice to see them belted around, actually). He even decks Dick Sargent, the 'second Darrin' from "Bewitched." It was probably a toss up whether Elvis enjoyed the fight scene or his wild driving more.

The movie's pacing leaves something to be desired, especially during the second half, and it could definitely have been much better -- kind of a recurring refrain for almost all of Elvis' post-1967 movies. It's not the most exciting story, but Elvis is great -- he looks supercool, he runs through a fair few emotions quite convincingly, and he's generally one groovy cat. Michele Carey is supremely sexy but her character is tremendously annoying. I don't know what kind of mental problems she's supposed to have -- she's portrayed as functionally, if not actually, a multiple-personality type -- but I suppose that some of her ephemeral nature and far-outness reflects the pop culture of the times. As Elvis said, "Nuts. Absolutely nuts." She even feeds Elvis a pill that keeps him asleep for days. Speaking of drug references, whoever designed the "Edge Of Reality" dream sequence must have been on some interesting substances at the time. Far out, man. Anyway, Ms Carey's bodacious Bernice (or whatever she wants to call herself) gets on my nerves, as it does on Elvis' Greg Nolan, and as I suspect it would on just about anybody. The problem is that it's to an extent that's detrimental to the film. Maybe they could have toned her back a bit -- she is good at the role, though, and also provides some comic relief (albeit sometimes exasperating). The chemistry between her and Elvis is spot-on, too.

It's fun to see familiar Los Angeles landmarks, even though I first came to that city almost 20 years after this film was shot. Elvis spent a lot of time in L A and there's just something fundamentally weird, for me, about seeing him driving around the city that a couple of decades or so later I'd be tooling around. Maybe coming to the US from another country helps emphasize that weirdness. By the way, Elvis' father is seen sitting at a table at the LA Music Center. Speaking of family, Albert, the Great Dane, is played by Elvis' dog, Brutus (Elvis had two Great Danes at the time -- the other was Snoopy). I must say that I find this amateur dog's acting very impressive.

Among the human supporting cast are Don Porter, as a Hugh Hefner type, and Rudy Vallee. Both are perfect in their roles and it's cool to see Elvis with Rudy Vallee, the singing idol of an earlier generation. Also of note is the girl who played the mermaid model, Susan Henning, who also showed up on the 1968 TV Special as an 'intimate' of Elvis' "Guitar Man" and who had a torrid real-life romance with him. I think that one or two of the other models in this film showed up on Elvis' TV special, too.

All of Elvis' last few movies, after "Speedway" (filmed during the summer of 1967) featured fewer songs than most of those that had come before. This film has only four songs: the happy "Wonderful World" (somewhat ironic for the time, just after the Tet Offensive and just before Martin Luther King's assassination), the dramatic (and overlooked) "Edge Of Reality," the funky "A Little Less Conversation," and the lounge-singerish "Almost In Love." The impetus for me revisiting this film was that a remixed version of "A Little Less Conversation" has just -- yesterday -- topped the US pop charts, 25 years after Elvis' death. As I write, Elvis has been #1 in the UK for a phenomenal three consecutive weeks (maybe four, by the time this is posted), has spent three weeks on top of the Irish charts, and spent at least a week or two (so far) at #1 in each of Japan, Hong Kong, Denmark, Norway, The Netherlands, Australia, Canada, and Mexico. He's currently Top-5, Top-10, Top-20, and Top-40 in a bunch of other countries around the world. With the success of this single, Elvis broke the tie that had him and the Beatles matched for British #1 hits -- now he has 18 to his credit to their 17. Pretty amazing, and particularly ironic that a fairly obscure '60s movie song was the one that did the trick.
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7/10
Singing Idols Of Two Generations
bkoganbing13 May 2008
Warning: Spoilers
Without the musical numbers of which no Elvis Presley film could be without, Live A Little, Love A Little plays more like one of those big screen Ross Hunter comedies that might have starred Rock Hudson. In fact the characters that Elvis and leading lady Michele Carey play bear no small resemblance to the ones played by Hudson and Paula Prentiss in one of my favorite of Hudson's comedies, Man's Favorite Sport.

A chance encounter at the beach with a very kookie girl played by Carey leaves Elvis's life in total chaos. He finds himself working two full time jobs as a photographer at the same time just to keep up with his new mode of upscale living. Of course in the end she tones it down a bit when she finds true love with the King.

Of course since this is a Presley vehicle, Live A Little, Love A Little has to have a score. It has four numbers the best of which is the song sung right at the beginning called Wonderful World. It's a philosophical type number, the kind Bing Crosby used to have a specialty of in his films. Sad to say that the King's time as film star was drawing to a close. Had this been done in the Fifties, these songs might have yielded a Presley hit or two.

As usual Colonel Tom Parker made sure that Elvis was given good support by some veteran familiar players. Next to Walt Disney, Elvis Presley and his manager were the great employers of veteran movie faces who were finding it harder and harder to get work. Such folks as Dick Sargent, Joan Shawlee, Sterling Holloway are in the cast.

Two more who play Elvis's rival employers who work in the same building are Don Porter and Rudy Vallee. Porter plays a Hugh Hefner type hedonist publisher of skin magazines and displays a certain avuncular charm.

And Live A Little, Love A Little gives fans a treat to see singing idols of two generation sharing the screen. It would have been great to see Rudy Vallee and the King do a number together, but I suspect that the lack was by mutual consent. Vallee plays another variation on his conservative ad agency president from How To Succeed in Busines Without Really Trying.

Though Elvis's vehicles were not up to what he was putting out earlier in his career, Live A Little, Love A Little is a nice bit of entertainment and the King's fans will love it.
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5/10
A little less conversation, a little more singing would have been nice
blanche-228 June 2005
Live a Little, Love a Little was a departure from the normal Elvis Presley travelogues, and this off-the-beaten-track trend continued for the rest of his film career (four films). It's sexy with a more adult theme than usual. Even more unusual, it only has a few songs, including "A Little Less Conversation." I say, if you're going to sing four, sing a few more. It's a movie, it's Elvis, it's not a drama.

Elvis plays a photographer who meets a strange young woman of uncertain name on the beach. His life then takes a series of bizarre turns. Michele Carey is the woman, and she's not only beautiful but very funny as well.

The film is mildly entertaining. Elvis' real life pooch Brutus has a supporting role. He was a superb actor!
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8/10
Elvis' strangest film starts out great,but second half weak
django-11 August 2001
This must be Elvis' strangest film. It starts off in high gear, throws in a lot of mysterious twists, features a beautiful and funny co-star (Michele Carey--where are you? We need you back!), and has an intriguing soundtrack which doesn't sound remotely like anything else Elvis ever recorded--it even has a freak-out sequence, with the King singing a psychedelic song! I'm guessing that the creators of this film wanted to make a "swinging sixties" version of a screwball comedy, and they almost succeeded. For the first half, I thought I'd discovered a lost classic...or at least a lost camp classic! However, about mid-way through, the breakneck pace slows down, the weirdness goes away, and the rest of the film stumbles along like a mediocre sitcom. Still, no one could accuse this oddity of being a "formula" film, at least the first half. And this Elvis fan would much rather watch this or the equally quirky THE TROUBLE WITH GIRLS than watch GI BLUES or BLUE HAWAII. TCM showed this letterboxed, the way it should be seen, so you might want to wait a year or two until a DVD comes out...or at least until TCM has another Elvis festival and shows the letterboxed version at 3 a.m...rather than watch it panned and scanned. I think that anyone with the least interest in Elvis would enjoy watching this film, if only for the freakout sequence with the song "Edge of Reality."
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A little less conversation, a little more action baby...
Rusty-6126 October 2000
I've been an Elvis fan for 10 years now, and I've seen most of his 60's movies. For some reason I didn't rent this one till recently- I think it's because I had it confused with "The Trouble With Girls", which I have no desire to see. Anyway, we rented this because we saw it had "A Little Less Conversation" in it and liked it so much we ended up buying it.

Elvis plays Greg Nolan, a photographer who..ok, there's not much of a plot to describe here. The storyline consists of a girl he meets who keeps changing her name (Bernice/Betty/Suzie/Alice) and personality, spending most of the movie alternately screwing with Elvis' mind and coming on to him. Meanwhile, Elvis gets two jobs for girlie-type magazines in the same building- one of them is called "Classic Cat Magazine" (or maybe it's Classy Cat) being a photographer and pretends at both that he only works for that magazine, while he literally runs back and forth between the two jobs, changing clothes and trying not to have one boss find out about the other. Red West makes his usual cameo as a guy in a fight scene whose ass Elvis ends up kicking (always fun to watch).

This is a pretty fun Elvis movie, and since it was filmed in '68, right around the time Elvis did the comeback special, the King was in great shape, looking pretty sharp with his sideburns and tan. He also looks like he's having fun, and doesn't feel too stupid. "Spinout" is entertaining, but half the time Elvis looks pretty unhappy. One of my Elvis trivia-type books said this movie has the distinction of being the only one he ever has sex in (offscreen, of course) but I think the only way you could tell this is by him waking up in a girl's bed. His co-star, who looks like a cross between Sharon Tate and how Liz Taylor looked in the 60's, was kind of annoying (though not as bad as some of the actresses he's worked with, and at least she has a great wardrobe. It was mainly the fact that she had this kind of whispery voice like Taylor. The clothes and hair are all really cool. There are only 4 songs in the movie, but two of them are especially good. I loved "The Edge of Reality"-Elvis has this trippy dream because Bernice/Betty/Suzie/Alice has been messing with his mind so much. The song is great, and Elvis wears this tailored set of pajamas that look more like a blue sharkskin suit. I think whoever designed and choreographed the dream sequence might have paid a little visit to Dr. Nick's, if you know what I mean, but it's pretty cool. The highlight of the movie for me was definitely "A Little Less Conversation", which Elvis sings to a hot babe at a swinging cocktail party as he's getting her to leave with him. Watch for the male red-haired go-go dancer that they pass who dances so furiously and wildly that his gyrations actually make him upstage Elvis for a few seconds, which is no small feat. As he and the chick are leaving, they pass other go-go dancers, saunter out the door of the cool 60's pad, and hop in Elvis' Cadillac that the valets just happened to have pulled up in front at that second, while Elvis smoothly never misses a beat and manages to make the whole thing look like he does it every night. Now that's how you leave a party!

One of Elvis' better flicks from the 60's, and definitely my favorite movie of his to watch from the late 60's.
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7/10
One Of The Best, But Lesser Known Elvis Flicks
lisa-kevin35314 May 2009
I am a huge Elvis fan, but even I admit most of his movies were dreadful, and that's being kind. This one is a pleasant exception. Not only is it quite funny at times, but the songs in the film are well above average for a Presley movie, and Elvis himself looks and acts better than in the seven or so films that preceded it. He has a natural flair for comedy, as anyone will know who has seen his earlier film from 1962 "Follow That Dream," which was another under-appreciated Elvis film. He acts more grown up and the situations he's thrust into have a much more adult theme than in his previous efforts. By the time this film was released, these points were lost to most critics, who dismissed it as just another infantile Elvis musical. That's a shame, because it deserved a wider audience than it received.
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8/10
The Edge of Reality
Callum Gee18 September 2007
I recently viewed this underrated gem for the first time in many years and almost forgot what an entertaining ride it is - especially in that 'speed buggy' at the start of the opening sequence.

I very much prefer the movies Elvis was churning out towards the end of his movie career as opposed to the likes of "Harum Scarum", "Clambake" and "Easy Come, Easy Go".

"Live A Little..." gave us a more mature Elvis in his first adult-type comedy film role, and even though the script engages a series of weird scenarios that border on the insane, it's great to see EP make his mark in this type of movie. Elvis looks great physically and his wardrobe too has got to be admired - check out the scene were he is wearing those shades...so cool! The film boasts only four songs but they appear to be of a higher standard than most of his mid-60's vehicles. The two stand-out numbers are the No. 1 smash hit "A Little Less Conversation" and the dramatic dream sequence of "Edge of Reality".

The tag line of the movie is "Watch Elvis click with these chicks!" and that he most certainly does especially in the form of leading lady Michelle Carey and Co-Star, Celeste Yarnall ('Miss Little Less Conversation'). Elvis' pet Great Dane, 'Brutus' also gets a co-starring role and almost steals the show - his character is called 'Albert'! A fine male cast helps the proceedings too in the form of Dick Sargent, Don Porter and veteran singing 'heartthrob', Rudy Vallee. So, "Live A Little, Love A Little" is entertainingly weird and wonderful and along with "Charro", "The Trouble With Girls" and "Change of Habit" was the slight departure from his typical sixties musical that Elvis needed at this point in his career.

Finally, if you're only viewing this as just a curiosity piece then be curious enough to check out that amazing fight scene in the Newspaper printing warehouse - this has got to be the best fight scene in an Elvis movie ever staged!
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"Daft but quite entertaining!"
jamesraeburn20037 January 2004
Press photographer Greg Nolan (Presley)finds himself contending with sexy model Bernice who has several boyfriends all of whom know her by different names, while holding down two jobs in the same office block.

Daft (especially the dream sequence) but certainly not the worst from Presley and its quite an entertaining comedy with funny moments. Loved Albert the gigantic hound! Elvis sings "Edge Of Reality", "Almost In Love" and most notably "A Little Less Conversation" which was remixed and reissued in 2002 giving the King a posthumous number one.
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The first of the last batch for Elvis
Joe-2904 November 2002
During the making of the 1968 comeback Tv special, Presley was making a lot of changes and so was his manager. Here we get to see a new type of Elvis movie that although suited for kids has more of an adult theme than ever before. With a light hearted sexual theme and some better but fewer songs this Presley picture is better than most from his later career. After this, each of the last four films he ever did had a new slant to them that differed greatly from his early to mid 1960s movies. Nicely made with few little quiet jokes and generally good fun with a cameo from Elvis's father, Vernon. Lively entertainment thats better than Star Wars.
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6/10
A photographer shuffles between two jobs.
Michael O'Keefe27 November 1999
A talented young photographer (Elvis Presley) lands two jobs in the same building and slinks his way back and forth. One job is for a high tone advertising agency and the other is for a slick girlie magazine. Michelle Carey plays the sex starved landlady. Better than average Elvis flick featuring four good tunes. "Edge of Reality" song and scene are very memorable. So is scene of Presley and Carey in bed. This comedy also stars Don Porter, Dick Sargent and Rudy Vallee. Elvis' movie career on an up swing. Norman Taurog directs.
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8/10
A Revived Elvis and some good songs
rpm1950-631-96659510 January 2010
Nothing about the movie plot here, just the music and the newly revived Elvis. His sideburns were back, his body was slender and more muscular, looking better than he had looked in a movie since "Blue Hawaii". Michelle Carey is his costar, a buxom slightly kooky girl full of energy. There are only about three songs in the movie, but all are first rate, beginning with "Edge of Reality", which came out on a single as the flip side of "If I Can Dream", the single that came from Elvis' 68 comeback TV special. "Edge" is a very good off beat song that to many fans was better than "Dream" and helped make the record a double sided hit. The next is "A Little Less Conversation", an up tempo number that, as you all know by now, was remixed and re-released a couple of years back and became Elvis' 31st number one hit. Then there is "Almost in Love", a great quirky love ballad that is one of his better songs ever. This is a highly enjoyable movie and better than many of his others. See it.
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10/10
Psychedelic Elvis in a happy, wonderful world.
copper19633 September 2006
I first saw this on the old "4:30 Movie" on Channel Seven in New York City. They were having an "Elvis Presley Week" for his January 8 birthday. I think this was as close as Elvis ever came to posting drug induced images on the big screen. The surreal "Edge of Reality" dream number reeks of acid tabs. Michele Carey's character gives the impression that she has dabbled in illegal pills of some kind. The milkman and "Harry Baby" are two stoned men in need of a good talking to. I could go on--but I won't. Rather, I will say there are four songs in the picture. They are all terrific. And who is that knockout Elvis sings and dances with in the party scene? She's gorgeous. Unfortunately, there is a long, vicious fight sequence in a newspaper plant when Elvis gets a pink slip. Elvis' huge dog, "Brutus," receives star treatment. The opening credits has Elvis, sans helmet, tooling around the California surf. Fans of Elvis will admire the cordial way he treats the bizarre Carey whenever she goes on one of her crazy rants. Always the gentleman, he even places a board between the amorous Carey and himself when they are forced to sleep together. Nice fellow, huh? The plot revolves around Elvis' need to find and keep two jobs as a photographer in the magazine world: one is with the conservative Rudy Valee, the other is with the swinging Don Porter, "Gidget's" dad. I like how Elvis' opening line to both of his potential bosses secretaries throws them off stride: "Tell Mister (fill in the blank) that Greg Nolan is here with the truth." Elvis your hired.
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6/10
A decent Elvis film
atlasmb8 January 2013
After the Doris Day/Rock Hudson era, America was moving into the era of the psychedelic sixties. Relationships in movies were less about playing the games of the fifties and more about being direct. So, you are more likely to see a woman be the aggressor in the later sixties. The female lead in this movie chases Elvis until he catches her. The dream sequence is less like a Dali painting than those in the fifties and more psychedelic in lighting. Some seem to equate "kooky" with the sixties, perhaps due to the influence of drugs, and that carries through in this plot and the characterization of the female lead. One might call this film a sex farce set midst the California lifestyle.

I enjoyed this film. Though the story was silly, the energy of the film was upbeat and fun. The women were beautiful, the music was consequential and Elvis actually seemed to be enjoying himself at times (did you ever notice how he seldom smiles in some of his films?). Yes, there are plenty of cinema clichés and some throwaway scenes, but I enjoyed the kooky chemistry between Elvis and Bernice. Injecting the obligatory Elvis fistfight does not help the story or the pacing, but Elvis manages to move the story along with his personality. See Viva Las Vegas for a film with real magnetism between the stars.
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7/10
Amazing Elvis Presley movie
ebiros21 September 2012
Elvis gets into lot of trouble when a girl named Bernice catches him in her eyes on a beach of southern California.

Greg (Elvis) is a free spirited photographer. He's enjoying his life until he meets a girl named Bernice (Michele Carley). Elvis finds that he has a handful of trouble when she starts to show up everywhere in his life.

When I watch some movies from the '50s, and '60s, I really feel that we're sliding backwards in culture. Life was much posher then than it is now. Clothing are beautiful, houses are beautiful, and people had more open outlook about life.

I also have to mention about the women of that era. They really look like women, and I guess so do the men. They're stunningly (and I mean stunning) gorgeous, and much more beautiful than the celebrities of today.

The movie is shot beautifully around Los Angeles. When I watch this movie, I get envious of the people who lived there at that time.

I really loved this movie, because it's a beautiful movie. I don't care if we don't have all the high tech equipments, just move me back to that era !
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6/10
Like a Bad Dream When Your Sick From School
diamondgroup7 July 2005
Warning: Spoilers
There is something quite entertaining about this movie, but I can't totally figure out what it is. It is certainly better than other Elvis vehicles, and I like the music. The psycho babe is about one step away from a mad slasher movie. I really wouldn't be surprise if she cut Elvis's legs off after drugging him for several days. After all, she does sic her vicious Great Dane on him and drive him into the ocean. Real light hearted and zany, wouldn't you say? She then gets him evicted and takes all of his possessions.She is obviously as loose sexually as a shovel full of peas. She even carries on with the goofy old milkman, for God's sake. Elvis gets a little wacky from mere contact with her. He apparently wants nothing to do with her, but gleefully moves in with her and socks Dick Sargeant for kissing her.I think I am trying to apply some logic to this plot and that in itself is very silly. The dog, by the way, takes top acting honors.

The funniest thing about this entire film is the bedroom scene. Here is the King Stud of his generation lying next to a beautiful nymphet, who wants him badly, and there is a board between them. The Puritan's in New England live! Who would actually believe this? In real life that mattress would be screaming for mercy.

Having said all of this, I do find this movie enjoyable. I really liked the attempt to bring Elvis into the Woodstock generation, with some colored lights and a guy dressed as a GreatDane.Of course, Elvis winds up with this whack-job at the end. I am not sure we ever really find out what her real name is, or her real marital status. The delivery boy, the milkman and her semi-gay ex will all be disappointed.
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10/10
A compelling story
Angelica Jordan Molligi6 February 2013
Elvis Presley portrays Greg Nolan a womanizing photographer who runs into a woman on the beach and then crazy things begin to happen. She claims her name is Alice but in the movie she has three other different names so it does get confusing but by the end of the movie her actual name is said. She has different names for different moods. She puts him to sleep and he sleeps for several days losing both his job and apartment. She is crazy but funny. It is a beautiful and funny love story of Greg and "Alice". It has a combination of physical and verbal comedy which has-made Live a Little Love a little a fantastic movie. Elvis Presley adds a number of songs in this move including A little Less conversation, Wonderful World, Edge of reality, and Almost In love. This is defiantly a must see film. It keeps you on the edge of your seat anticipating what will happen next.
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9/10
Elvis great in sex farce!
nigel778 January 2007
Elvis in a sex farce. Elvis in bed with his leading lady. What a change in approach we got with Live A Little, Love A Little. With songs kept to a minimum, but including a surreal scene involving Edge of Reality, and the upbeat Wonderful World, this film was a great change in direction from the earlier Presley travelogues. Michele Carey was certainly one of The King's most attractive (and sexy)leading ladies and she pairs with Elvis on screen well. An interesting touch was having Rudy Vallee (himself a music idol from yesteryear) as one of Elvis' bosses and the contrast between him and other boss Don Porter is very well done. Nice doses of humor make this film a viewing treat.
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6/10
LIVE A LITTLE, LOVE A LITTLE (Norman Taurog, 1968) **1/2
MARIO GAUCI18 August 2007
A thoroughly bland title hides a surprisingly tolerable and rather effective (if belated) change-of-pace which could well have been advertised as "Elvis goes Screwball". Arguably modeled on the popular series of Rock Hudson-Doris Day romantic comedies, the central situation, in fact, is basically a virtual retread of Howard Hawks' BRINGING UP BABY (1938), with leading lady Michele Carey (from, appropriately enough, Hawks' own EL DORADO [1966]) – playing a ditzy artist/socialite disrupting Elvis' life at every turn; actually, Hawks had recently successfully reworked the formula with Rock Hudson himself in the underrated MAN'S FAVORITE SPORT? (1964) but the best tribute to the 1938 classic would be paid the following decade in Peter Bogdanovich's hilarious, WHAT'S UP, DOC? (1972).

Anyway, The King plays a fashion photographer here – not that he's liable to dispel memories of David Hemmings from BLOWUP (1966), you understand! As far as the beachside setting/advertising environment goes, I guess this owes its inspiration to the neglected Tony Curtis/Alexander Mackendrick comedy DON'T MAKE WAVES (1967) but, as I said earlier, for all its derivations, it's not a bad star vehicle at all and Elvis even gets to sing during a lightly surreal dream sequence – with Carey's mastiff assuming human characteristics and acting as his guide! Elvis and the dog have a great rapport, which is just as well since it was his own pet in real life, Brutus! I also liked the fact that the film offers nice supporting parts to two Hollywood veterans – Rudy Vallee (who was a crooner himself and a Preston Sterges regular back in the day) and Don Porter (who is perhaps best-remembered for playing the male lead in the infamous SHE-WOLF OF London [1946]).

While this one may be more engaging than most other Elvis vehicles of its time, nowadays the film is perhaps most notable for introducing the unlikeliest of Elvis hits, "A Little Less Conversation", a remixed version of which became a worldwide chart-topper in 2002..after a very disappointing showing in the charts when originally released! Surprisingly enough, Presley only has three songs throughout the film ("Edge of Reality" is another good one) which might disappoint his more hardened fans and indeed have them clamor for "a little less conversation, a little more action please"! For the record, this happened to be the last of 9 Presley films directed by Hollywood veteran Norman Taurog who specialized, appropriately enough, in comedies and musicals having handled in his prime George M. Cohan, Maurice Chevalier, Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire, Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland, Mario Lanza, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, etc. – not to mention having been the youngest (and probably most forgotten) of Oscar-winning directors!
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Laugh a Little, Yawn a Lot.
Poseidon-319 August 2002
This late entry in Elvis's film career is an uneasy combination of the total fluff he had done before and an attempt to be more hip, adult and non-musical. Aside from the tune sung over the opening credits, he only sings three songs. So many capsule reviews of this film describe the plot as Presley juggling two jobs, but that aspect doesn't even come about until far into the film and, though it is a plot point, the real story lies elsewhere. Presley zooms his dune buggy to the beach and begins to take some photos. Immediately, the bizarre Carey tries to seduce him. When it doesn't work, she has her huge dog chase him into the ocean until he is willing to come into her beach house. Then she drugs him and keeps him in her spare room for days! (It should be noted that this is a "comedy"!) Knowing that Presley was a massive pill-popper (who, in fact, died from it!), it is unsettling to watch him in a film that takes this sort of thing so lightly, but the '60's offered a different idea of drug use. Presley soon finds out that Carey is a bit of a head case, adopting different names throughout the day, based on how she feels, and entertaining a variety of men. Carey (looking and sounding like a very poor man's Elizabeth Taylor, though she is undeniably beautiful) could not possibly be more aggravating, grating, infuriating or ludicrous. (She even gets to write on a mirror with lipstick ala Taylor in "Butterfield 8"!) The actress's considerable charms are tested to the breaking point. As for Presley and his two jobs...This is strictly bad TV sitcom level plotting and contrivance. Aside from the chance to see Presley looking well, the film would be completely without value save two things. One is a totally bizarre dream ballet (which no doubt had Agnes de Mille rolling in her grave) complete with a man in a Great Dane outfit, Elvis in shiny "pajamas" and a bunch of balletic (if that's the word to use) stand-in's for the other characters in the film. The song, "Edge of Reality" is actually quite good, but this sequence is a campy, uproariously idiotic mess. It's so bad that it's impossible to look away. The other highlight is the recently remixed "A Little Less Conversation". The credits list a choreographer for this number, but there is almost no dancing which is disappointing. A few lame go-goers, lean from side to side in the background. Instead, it's a long shot of Elvis singing to Yarnall as he sweeps her out of a party and into his car. The song is way too brief (and interrupted at the very beginning by an annoying sound effect), but what there is is wonderful to hear and there is a galaxy of funky, wacky '60's outfits on display. Yarnall is on hand basically to have her coat placed on her shoulders THREE TIMES in her scant screen time. The film serves as a neat time capsule of late '60's clothes and hair and make-up and has a few great sets. The story is awful and told very choppily. Attempts at adult sexuality are pitiful. Apparently, Elvis had an aversion to love scenes. One year before "Midnight Cowboy" and here he is with a board between him and Carey in bed! (Though there are occasional homoerotic moments like Elvis doing dishes with Sargent--who also wields a phallic champagne bottle, steam-rooming with Porter, dropping trou with Vallee and having the dog come to life as a man and taking him to a dream ballet!)
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A Little Less Conversation
John Macaluso8 July 2002
This soundtrack "A Little Less Conversation" from the movie is nowdays very popular in 2002 with Elvis' remix with David Holmes. It was one cool song he sang in the movie, the other one I think that's also cool is "Edge Of Reality". Those song sequences from the movie would look great in any music video on MTV, VH-1 or whatever. Just because of "A Little Less Conversation" it's keeping Elvis on the top charts as it has for 4 consecutive weeks. The movie is pretty awesome too. A must see for all Elvis fans and movie lovers.
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7/10
very enjoyable
Frank-872 July 1999
I am a big Elvis fan, and I have seen this one many times. Hard to tell whether I should recommend this movie to fans or to everyone who likes light hearted old fashioned comedies. This movie is certainly light years away from the crap that Elvis had been made to act in before. Check it out. The music is great, too. Only 4 songs, including Wonderful world.
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Best Elvis movie ever.
Tonci Pivac7 March 2003
I am the biggest Elvis fan, I have all his movies, but this one is my favourite, its the best one ever it had such cool songs, like (Edge Of reality) (Little less conversation) and more. If your an Elvis fan and you havent seen this film yet, Then you are not an Elvis Fan, it is a crime not to watch this movie.

10/10
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Strange, but good movie
kwbucsfan20 August 2001
This movie was a strange movie, but several steps up from the stinkaroos that Elvis had done in recent years. I thought that the dream sequence was rather strange. But all around a decent movie. An interesting point is that the Great Dane was actually Elvis's personal dog Brutus.
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Decent
Michael_Elliott27 February 2008
Live a Little, Love a Little (1968)

** 1/2 (out of 4)

A somewhat strange little film that features Elvis playing a photographer who meets a strange woman (Michele Carey) and soon has her becoming obsessed with him even though she keeps changing her own name. After costing him his job and apartment, she gets him a new apartment but it's so high he is forced to work two jobs, in the same building, while trying not to let the boss guys know. This is certainly a departure from some of the other films Elvis was doing around this time. For starters, this is certainly a more adult type film with a lot of sexual innuendo and even one psychedelic scene, which is something we didn't see in earlier pictures. The best performance of the film comes from the girl's Great Dane who steals the film each time he shows up. His early scenes with Elvis on the beach actually get a good performance out of the singer and manages to be very funny. The early scenes between Elvis and Carey are also very funny and there are a few more laughs throughout. Elvis is decent here but again, I wouldn't say he gives a good performance. Carey is the real star though as she makes her character really stand out and memorable. The music also is a lot different than we'd heard before but it works.
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6/10
Live a Little, Love a Little (1968) **1/2
JoeKarlosi26 August 2007
One of my personal favorite Elvis films that I'm partial to. For beginners, Elvis physically looks to be in good form, and was probably in better spirits due to his recent highly acclaimed "1968 Comeback" TV show, which may have given him the shot in the arm he needed after making 30 or so of these pictures throughout the sixties. In some ways this film follows the screwball pattern of his other comedies, but at the same time it's more adult and not completely typical. Presley plays a fashion photographer whose life is turned into complete disarray by a woman with half her screws loose (Michele Carey). She succeeds in making Elvis lose his job and his apartment, yet arranges for him to get another house where she and her scene-stealing dog Albert can always crash in to keep an eye on him. To try and get back on his feet, Elvis takes on two new photography jobs at the same time in the same building (one of his bosses is former crooner Rudy Vallee, minus his megaphone).

Carey is a very attractive lead lady, and her free-spirited but erratic character is well realized. Elvis gets into one of the best fist-fights of his screen career, but only manages to perform three songs within the movie itself (he also sings "Wonderful World" over the credits, which makes for a pleasant opener). Two of the others are very good: "A Little Less Conversation", which interestingly became a hit in recent years via a re-mixed version, and my favorite -- "Edge of Reality", a diversion of sorts for Presley in the latter part of the decade, which is nicely showcased during a bizarre and trippy dream sequence. **1/2 out of ****
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