5.9/10
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42 user 5 critic

Live a Little, Love a Little (1968)

Trailer
2:09 | Trailer
Photographer Greg Nolan moonlights in two full-time jobs to pay the rent, but has trouble finding time to do them both without his bosses finding out.

Director:

Norman Taurog

Writers:

Michael A. Hoey (screenplay), Dan Greenburg (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Elvis Presley ... Greg Nolan
Michele Carey ... Bernice
Don Porter ... Mike Lansdown
Rudy Vallee ... Penlow
Dick Sargent ... Harry
Sterling Holloway ... Milkman
Celeste Yarnall ... Ellen
Eddie Hodges ... Delivery Boy
Joan Shawlee ... Robbie's Mother
Mary Grover Mary Grover ... Miss Selfridge
Emily Banks ... RKC&P Receptionist
Michael Keller Michael Keller ... Art Director
Merri Ashley Merri Ashley ... 1st Secretary
Phyllis Davis ... 2nd Secretary
Ursula Menzel Ursula Menzel ... Perfume Model
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Storyline

Photographer Greg Nolan meets Bernice, and loses both his job and his apartment. However, Bernice manages to get him a new apartment, but it is so expensive that he has to get two full-time jobs. Nolan has trouble finding time to do them both without his bosses finding out. Written by Mattias Thuresson

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

ELVIS PRESLEY show you how to Live a Little, Love a Little See more »


Certificate:

M | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This film marked the end of Presley's streak of working with longtime director Norman Taurog. Their collaboration began in 1960 with G.I. Blues (1960), which was followed by Blue Hawaii (1961), Girls! Girls! Girls! (1962), It Happened at the World's Fair (1963), Tickle Me (1965), Spinout (1966), Double Trouble (1967), and Speedway (1968). Altogether they made nine films. The only other notable directors who worked with Elvis more than once were:

Richard Thorpe directed Jailhouse Rock (1957) and Fun in Acapulco (1963));

Gene Nelson directed Kissin' Cousins (1964) and Harum Scarum (1965);

John Rich directed Roustabout (1964) and Easy Come, Easy Go (1967));

and Peter Tewksbury directed Stay Away, Joe (1968) and The Trouble with Girls (1969). See more »

Goofs

At 35 minutes in, Elvis visits the offices of Classic Cat Magazine. Signage on the wall reading "Classic Cat / A Landsdown Enterprise" appears next to a sexy illustration of a bosomy model. We then see the signage from Elvis's perspective, and now additional lettering appears out of nowhere: "CLASSIC CAT MAGAZINE" in block letters. Then we see the original perspective, and the lettering has disappeared. See more »

Quotes

Ellen: You don't taste bad for a saggitarius.
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Connections

Featured in This Is Elvis (1981) See more »

Soundtracks

A Little Less Conversation
(uncredited)
Written by Mac Davis & Billy Strange
Performed by Elvis Presley
Choreographed by Jack Baker
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User Reviews

A little less conversation, a little more action baby...
26 October 2000 | by Rusty-61See all my reviews

I've been an Elvis fan for 10 years now, and I've seen most of his 60's movies. For some reason I didn't rent this one till recently- I think it's because I had it confused with "The Trouble With Girls", which I have no desire to see. Anyway, we rented this because we saw it had "A Little Less Conversation" in it and liked it so much we ended up buying it.

Elvis plays Greg Nolan, a photographer who..ok, there's not much of a plot to describe here. The storyline consists of a girl he meets who keeps changing her name (Bernice/Betty/Suzie/Alice) and personality, spending most of the movie alternately screwing with Elvis' mind and coming on to him. Meanwhile, Elvis gets two jobs for girlie-type magazines in the same building- one of them is called "Classic Cat Magazine" (or maybe it's Classy Cat) being a photographer and pretends at both that he only works for that magazine, while he literally runs back and forth between the two jobs, changing clothes and trying not to have one boss find out about the other. Red West makes his usual cameo as a guy in a fight scene whose ass Elvis ends up kicking (always fun to watch).

This is a pretty fun Elvis movie, and since it was filmed in '68, right around the time Elvis did the comeback special, the King was in great shape, looking pretty sharp with his sideburns and tan. He also looks like he's having fun, and doesn't feel too stupid. "Spinout" is entertaining, but half the time Elvis looks pretty unhappy. One of my Elvis trivia-type books said this movie has the distinction of being the only one he ever has sex in (offscreen, of course) but I think the only way you could tell this is by him waking up in a girl's bed. His co-star, who looks like a cross between Sharon Tate and how Liz Taylor looked in the 60's, was kind of annoying (though not as bad as some of the actresses he's worked with, and at least she has a great wardrobe. It was mainly the fact that she had this kind of whispery voice like Taylor. The clothes and hair are all really cool. There are only 4 songs in the movie, but two of them are especially good. I loved "The Edge of Reality"-Elvis has this trippy dream because Bernice/Betty/Suzie/Alice has been messing with his mind so much. The song is great, and Elvis wears this tailored set of pajamas that look more like a blue sharkskin suit. I think whoever designed and choreographed the dream sequence might have paid a little visit to Dr. Nick's, if you know what I mean, but it's pretty cool. The highlight of the movie for me was definitely "A Little Less Conversation", which Elvis sings to a hot babe at a swinging cocktail party as he's getting her to leave with him. Watch for the male red-haired go-go dancer that they pass who dances so furiously and wildly that his gyrations actually make him upstage Elvis for a few seconds, which is no small feat. As he and the chick are leaving, they pass other go-go dancers, saunter out the door of the cool 60's pad, and hop in Elvis' Cadillac that the valets just happened to have pulled up in front at that second, while Elvis smoothly never misses a beat and manages to make the whole thing look like he does it every night. Now that's how you leave a party!

One of Elvis' better flicks from the 60's, and definitely my favorite movie of his to watch from the late 60's.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

23 October 1968 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Kiss My Firm But Pliant Lips See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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