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Criterion’s Godzilla: The Showa-Era Films box set gets a trailer

Ahead of its hotly-anticipated release next month, Criterion has unveiled a trailer for its 1000th spine, Godzilla: The Showa-Era Films, which offers a look at the glorious restorations for the King of the Monsters’ fifteen earliest adventures, from the 1954 original through to Terror of Mechagodzilla in 1975. Take a look at the trailer here…

In 1954, an enormous beast clawed its way out of the sea, destroying everything in its path—and changing movies forever. The arresting original Godzilla soon gave rise to an entire monster-movie genre (kaiju eiga), but the King of the Monsters continued to reign supreme: in fourteen fiercely entertaining sequels over the next two decades, Godzilla defended its throne against a host of other formidable creatures, transforming from a terrifying symbol of nuclear annihilation into a benevolent (if still belligerent) Earth protector. Collected here for the first time are all fifteen Godzilla films of Japan’s Showa era,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

New Trailer for Godzilla: The Showa-era Films 15-Movie Blu-ray Collection, Coming This October from Criterion

  • DailyDead
As we recently reported, Criterion Collection will release 15 Godzilla films from the Showa era (initially released between 1954–1975) in a Blu-ray box set this October, and we now have a look at a brand new trailer for the release that gives us a tease of the new high-def digital transfers.

"In 1954, an enormous beast clawed its way out of the sea, destroying everything in its path—and changing movies forever. The arresting original Godzilla soon gave rise to an entire monster-movie genre (kaiju eiga), but the King of the Monsters continued to reign supreme: in fourteen fiercely entertaining sequels over the next two decades, Godzilla defended its throne against a host of other formidable creatures, transforming from a terrifying symbol of nuclear annihilation into a benevolent (if still belligerent) Earth protector. Collected here for the first time are all fifteen Godzilla films of Japan’s Showa era, in a landmark set showcasing the technical wizardry,
See full article at DailyDead »

Here’s a Look at Turner Classic Movies’ Halloween-Related Programming Coming This October

You can tell that the Halloween season is getting closer, between various retailers already donning their shelves with tons of decorations, the days are getting shorter, and Turner Classic Movies has debuted their October schedule online, which features an abundance of genre awesomeness that will be hitting airwaves this fall. Without a doubt, TCM is one of the best resources for classic film, so for those of you looking to broaden your horizons this Halloween, definitely check out their calendar and set those DVRs.

Also, TCM has designated Godzilla as their “Monster of the Month” for October, so look for a bunch of classic films featuring the “King of the Monsters” and other beloved Kaiju throughout October as well.

**All Listings are in Est.**

Friday, September 27th

3:15pm – The Mummy’s Shroud

6:30pm – The Mummy (1959)

Saturday, September 28th

2:00am – Belladonna of Sadness

3:30am – House (1977)

Sunday, September
See full article at DailyDead »

Godzilla: The Showa-era Films 15-Movie Blu-ray Collection Coming This October from Criterion

If seeing Godzilla: King of the Monsters gave you massive monster fever, then you're in luck, because Criterion Collection will release 15 Godzilla films from the Showa era (initially released between 1954–1975) in a Blu-ray box set this October.

Slated to come out on October 29th, Godzilla: The Showa Era Films features high-def digital transfers of all 15 films in the set, with new cover artwork for all of the titles and more than enough special features to keep kaiju fans happy. Read on for additional details, and visit Criterion Collection's website for more information.

"In 1954, an enormous beast clawed its way out of the sea, destroying everything in its path—and changing movies forever. The arresting original Godzilla soon gave rise to an entire monster-movie genre (kaiju eiga), but the King of the Monsters continued to reign supreme: in fourteen fiercely entertaining sequels over the next two decades, Godzilla defended its throne
See full article at DailyDead »

Godzilla: King of the Monsters - A History of King Ghidorah

Don Kaye May 29, 2019

The three-headed flying dragon remains Godzilla’s greatest and most dangerous enemy.

He’s considered Godzilla’s greatest nemesis, the Joker to the big green guy’s Batman. The Thanos to the kaiju monsters’ Avengers. He is King Ghidorah, the three-headed flying dragon of alien origin who first showed up in the Toho series of giant monster movies back in 1964 and has reappeared a number of times ever since, always out to destroy Earth, Godzilla and the latter’s allies. After making his last live-action appearance in a Japanese monster movie in 2001, Ghidorah will arrive in an American kaiju film for the first time next week, when he stars in Godzilla: King of the Monsters.

Ghidorah (who was also briefly known in America as “Ghidrah” early in his career) is a massive, armless, golden-scaled winged dragon, with three heads, two tails and one hell of a powerful
See full article at Den of Geek »

Godzilla: King of the Monsters - A History of Rodan

Don Kaye May 29, 2019

Giant winged monster Rodan was the second major inhabitant of Godzilla's shared universe.

After Godzilla (known as Gojira in his native Japan) had starred in two enormously successful movies -- 1954’s original Gojira and 1955’s Godzilla Raids Again -- Toho Studios was interested in producing more giant monster movies based around new creatures.

Writer Ken Kuronuma (real name Soda Michio) was tasked with coming up with a screenplay about a winged beast. He combined both the idea of a still-living prehistoric animal (in this case a member of the Pteranodon family), awakened like Godzilla by nuclear testing, with a story he had heard about a Kentucky Air National Guard pilot who was killed as he pursued a UFO in his plane.

The result was Rodan, released in 1956 in Japan and in 1957 in the U.S. as Rodan! The Flying Monster! It was the third major kaiju film of Toho’s initial run,
See full article at Den of Geek »

American Cinematheque and Beyond Fest Team Up For Godzilla Six-Film Marathon This Weekend!

This Saturday at the Egyptian Theatre in Los Angeles, CA, Beyond Fest will be co-presenting a six-film Godzilla marathon with American Cinematheque beginning at 1 pm and going until the final fiery breath is drawn! Included in the marathon are Godzilla: The Japanese Original, Destroy All Monsters, Godzilla’s Revenge, Godzilla vs Monster Zero, Godzilla vs […] The post American Cinematheque and Beyond Fest Team Up For Godzilla Six-Film Marathon This Weekend! appeared first on Dread Central.
See full article at Dread Central »

All 22 Pokémon Feature Films, Ranked Worst to Best (Photos)

  • The Wrap
All 22 Pokémon Feature Films, Ranked Worst to Best (Photos)
Let’s face it, Pokémon has never been a great anime; its messy premise has always better served the mechanics of a video game than the plot of a cartoon. But regardless of format, it’s the sense of almost mundane exploration in a big wide Pokémon world that makes the franchise memorable. While the heroes of “Dragonball Z” and “Gundam Wing” were tasked with saving humanity, Pokémon’s cartoon protagonist Ash Ketchum was often barely competent, just trying to make any sort of mark as he explored the wilderness. Ash didn’t even advance to the finals in the Indigo League Championships that wrapped up the show’s first story arc. That was a bold anticlimax for a property then in its heyday, with kids around the world still in the throes of Poké-mania. Through his shortcomings, Irl Pokémon trainers working to master the game could see themselves in
See full article at The Wrap »

The Bloodthirsty Trilogy

The Bloodthirsty Trilogy

Blu ray

Arrow Films

1970 – 1974 /2:35 / Street Date May 22, 2018

Starring Yukiko Kobayashi, Chôei Takahashi, Toshio Kurosawa

Cinematography by Kazutami Hara, Rokurô Nishigaki

Written by Ei Ogawa, Hiroshi Nagano

Directed by Michio Yamamoto

Hell-raising vampires invade the normally serene confines of Japanese cinema in three elegant 70’s shockers directed by Michio Yamamoto. Joining far-flung contemporaries like Jean Rollin, Harry Kümel and Stephanie Rothman, Yamamoto’s trilogy helped rejuvenate a genre always hungry for fresh blood.

In 1970’s The Vampire Doll, a restless spirit’s killing spree is the product of a tragic family secret – a storyline out of a Ross Hunter weepy with arterial spray taking the place of tears.

In search of her wayward brother and his girlfriend, Keiko arrives at a lonely country home only to find the sibling gone and his fiancee Yuko dead. Yuko’s saturnine mother is unusually tight-lipped about the circumstances surrounding her
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Toho Dreams

Is it possible, in the grand age of visual and storytelling sophistication in which we live (the sarcasm is coming through, isn’t it?), to experience the exquisite delirium of an old Japanese kaiju movie, say, anything in the Godzilla-and-related-monsters series from roughly 1957 to 1975, without responding to it simply as inept camp, or as something to be immediately discounted or condescended to because of the “fakeyness” of its special effects? (In that time range I’ve deliberately left out the original Gojira, released in 1954, a movie that has always, and particularly since its original Japanese version was re-distributed in the Us in 2004, enjoyed a measure of respect from demanding genre audiences because of its status as a painful and powerful response to the devastation at Hiroshima and Nagasaki in World War II.) Is it possible to enjoy these usually formulaic rubber-monster orgies of destruction precisely because of their artificiality?
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Escape Battling Kaiju in ‘City Shrouded in Shadow’

Escape Battling Kaiju in ‘City Shrouded in Shadow’
Way back in the XBox/PlayStation 2 era, you had monster fighting games like Godzilla: Destroy All Monsters Melee and War Of The Monsters. Sure, the latter didn’t have the Godzilla license, and Destroy All Monsters Melee wasn’t perfect, but who wouldn’t love the chance to smash up a city while battling a giant Kaiju? Well, […]
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

Original Godzilla Man-In-Suit Actor Haruo Nakajima Dies at 88

Original Godzilla Man-In-Suit Actor Haruo Nakajima Dies at 88
Fans of monster movies, and cinema in general, have to say goodbye to an absolute legend today. Haruo Nakajima, the actor who portrayed Godzilla in the suit in the original 1954 classic, has passed away at the age of 88. The exact cause of the actor's death has not yet been revealed.

As reported by Bloody Disgusting, Haruo Nakajima died at the age of 88 but leaves behind an absolutely tremendous and unforgettable legacy. Long before CGI could create just about anything one can dream up on screen, monsters were portrayed by actors in elaborate suits and the humans inside those suits had to bring them to life. Haruo Nakajima was tasked with bringing Godzilla to life for the first time in 1954 and thus created the most famous movie monster of all time. Even though he spent all of his time on screen in a costume, it is a performance that will never be forgotten.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Today in Movie Culture: The Avengers vs. Godzilla vs. King Kong, 'Baby Driver' Fan Art and More

  • Movies.com
Here are a bunch of little bites to satisfy your hunger for movie culture: Mashup Trailer of the Day: Alex Luthor perfectly pits The Avengers vs. Godzilla vs. King Kong and more in this fake trailer for Destroy All Monsters: Movie Parody of the Day: If John Wick and its sequel are two violent and deadly for you, here's Nerf John Wick (via /Film): Fan Art of the Day: Baby Driver just debuted at SXSW and already it has tons of fans inspired to create art for the movie, and director Edgar Wright shared a bunch: Going to post a little thread of all the cool fan art that people have done from the trailer. Love it. #BabyDriverMovie (Art by Beth Inglis) pic.twitter.com/Cqrg27kjnQ — edgarwright...

Read More
See full article at Movies.com »

The Valley of Gwangi

Gwangi! Ready your rifles and lariats because this is one of the best. Harryhausen’s happiest dinos- à go-go epic comes thundering back in HD heralded by Jerome Moross’s impressive music score. Unless you count The Animal World, all of the stop-motion magician’s feature films are now available in quality Blu-rays.

The Valley of Gwangi

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1969 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 95 min. / Street Date March 14, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: James Franciscus, Gila Golan, Richard Carlson, Laurence Naismith, Freda Jackson, Gustavo Rojo.

Cinematography: Erwin Hillier

Visual Effects by Ray Harryhausen

Art Direction: Gil Parrondo

Film Editor: Henry Richardson

Original Music: Jerome Moross

Written by William E. Bast

Produced by Charles H. Schneer

Directed by Jim O’Connolly

“Ladies and Gentlemen, what you are about to see has never been seen before, I Repeat, has never been seen before by human eyes!”

In just the last month three
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Review: "The Dunwich Horror" (1969) And "Murders In The Rue Morgue" (1971); Blu-ray Double Feature From Scream Factory

  • CinemaRetro
By Hank Reineke

Though this welcome Scream Factory issue marks the first time Murders in the Rue Morgue (1971) and The Dunwich Horror (1969) have been made available on domestic Blu-ray, both films enjoyed a previous release on DVD as part of MGM’s long-suspended “Midnite Movies” series. Rue Morgue was first paired with Cry of the Banshee (1970) in 2003, with Dunwich and Die Monster Die! (1965) following in 2005. Though both of these earlier sets are now technically out-of-print, copies remain generally available. Regardless, the more discerning horror-film aficionado would be well advised to seek out this new Blu edition. Not only does Scream Factory’s HD master offer a significant upgrade in visual presentation, the studio has also restored bits of censored footage missing from the Y2K releases.

H.P. Lovecraft’s short story The Dunwich Horror was written in the summer of 1928 and first published in the April 1929 issue of the appropriately titled Weird Tales magazine.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Marvel's Godzilla Comics Were Monstrously Weird

Marc Buxton May 31, 2019

What happens when Godzilla comes to the Marvel Universe? Wonderful things, that's what.

Talk about a mash-up for the ages! In the glory days of the Bronze Age, Godzilla, the King of the Monsters, the star of a zillion rubber suited monster films, the greatest monster that ever flattened a city, arrived in the Marvel Universe. While this scenario would give filmgoers of today an aneurysm of pure joy, it was par for the course of the anything goes comic scene of the 1970s. But that doesn’t make it any less awesome that Godzilla met, fought, teamed up with, and terrified some of Marvel’s greatest icons.

One of the wackiest parts of this book is that even though Marvel lost the rights to Godzilla after the book was canceled, some of the characters introduced in the Godzilla, King of the Monsters comic (including Godzilla himself-sorta
See full article at Den of Geek »

Kevin Smith Reveals Spoilers For His Moose Jaws Movie

Kevin Smith just premiered his new movie Yoga Hosers at the Sundance Film Festival, and while introducing that film, he spoke a little about the upcoming third and final film in his "True North" trilogy (movies set in Canada). Following in the wake of Tusk and Yoga Hosers, the new movie is called Moose Jaws, and it's a beat-for-beat remake of Steven Spielberg's classic Jaws — except instead of a shark, there's a killer moose on the loose. Smith has revealed that Jay and Silent Bob will make an appearance, and Silent Bob is going to be eaten by the moose, reminiscent of Quint in Jaws.

Slashfilm was in attendance at the Sundance screening when Smith gave even more spoilery info about Moose Jaws:

After reiterating the Jaws influence, Smith said that around the time he was working on the third act, he didn’t just want to copy Spielberg anymore.
See full article at GeekTyrant »

King Kong vs. Godzilla - Round Two: Speculating On How It Could Work

  • Cinelinx
It was recently announced that the long hoped-for remake of the 1962 Kaiju classic King Kong v. Godzilla is in the works. But how could such a film work today, considering subsequent changes in the characters and the jaded skepticism of modern audiences? Let’s take a look and see how this clash of Kaijus could work today. Keep in mind this is all just guess work and speculation.

People love “verses” films. Whether it’s Alien vs. Predator or Jason vs. Freddy or the upcoming Batman vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice, fans love to see two famous characters thrust together in one film to fight for supremacy. When you talk about Kaiju “verses” films, the ultimate monster battle of all time came in 1962 when the reigning king of giant beasts took on the original creature king. Toho Pictures’ hottest property, the mighty Godzilla, locked up with the ape that
See full article at Cinelinx »

Round-Up: New York Haunted Hayride, Tales From Beyond The Pale at Fantasia, Kaiju Movie Marathon

Now expanding to the Big Apple, the New York Haunted Hayride will take place on October 2nd. Also: details on both Tales from Beyond the Pale at Fantasia International Film Festival and a kaiju marathon of Godzilla-sized proportions on Shout! Factory TV.

New York City Haunted Hayride: Press Release: "Ten Thirty One Productions (Tto), the worldwide leader in producing live horror attractions, will expand the most popular Halloween attraction in the country, Los Angeles Haunted Hayride, to New York City this October for the first time ever. The wildly popular attraction, annually held in Los Angeles, led Mark Cuban to make the largest investment in “Shark Tank” history as well as a second investment by Live Nation. Tto will now be bringing its biggest and best scares from seven years of haunting the west coast to the east coast for the most horrifying experience in town.

“This expansion to
See full article at DailyDead »

The Giant Spider Invasion – The Blu Review

Wisconson-based regional filmmaker Bill Rebane’s no-budget wonder ($300k to be exact) The Giant Spider Invasion was a hilariously cheesy 1975 throwback to the giant-monster flicks of the 50s, a trend then enjoying a revival with films like Empire Of The Ants and Food Of The Gods. This outrageous mix of giant monster motifs and backwoods sleaze plays like a hybrid of Tarantula and The Blob with its mixture of giant spiders and falling meteors. I saw The Giant Spider Invasion at the long-shuttered Ellisville Cinema in West St. Louis County (on a double bill with the David Niven vampire comedy Old Dracula). I recall the poster in the lobby which featured a gargantuan spider bearing down on a group of terrified people. In the air above the mega-arachnid was three helicopters and lying crumpled at the spider’s legs were burning cars as spotlights filled the sky. One of the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »
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