4.9/10
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Inspector Clouseau (1968)

A string of robberies has occurred in Britain and it's up to Inspector Clouseau to catch the criminal.

Director:

Bud Yorkin

Writers:

Blake Edwards (based on a character created by), Maurice Richlin (based on a character created by) | 2 more credits »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Alan Arkin ... Insp. Jacques Clouseau
Frank Finlay ... Supt. Weaver
Delia Boccardo ... Lisa Morrel
Barry Foster ... Addison Steele
Patrick Cargill ... Commissioner Sir Charles Braithwaite
Beryl Reid ... Mrs. Weaver
Clive Francis ... Clyde Hargreaves
Richard Pearson ... Shockley
Michael Ripper ... Steven Frey
Susan Engel ... Carmichael
Wallas Eaton Wallas Eaton ... Hoeffler
Tutte Lemkow ... Frenchie LeBec
Katya Wyeth Katya Wyeth ... Meg (as Kathja Wyeth)
Tracey Crisp Tracey Crisp ... Julie
Geoffrey Bayldon ... Gutch
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Storyline

Detective Inspector is borrowed from the Surete on special assignment for Scotland Yard in hopes that a fresh outlook will help the government recover the loot from the Great Train Robbery, which is being used to underwrite a new crime wave. What they don't count on, however, is having more than one Closeeau on the job. Written by duke1029@aol.com

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

CALL THE POLICE! Inspector Clouseau is back!

Genres:

Comedy | Crime | Mystery

Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This is the only film in the original Pink Panther series not to be directed by Blake Edwards or be composed by Henry Mancini. See more »

Goofs

Having a group of people wearing the same masks robbing different banks at the same time would not help the criminals. Their finger prints would still be left behind . As well as the fact that our current laws if physics prevent being in two different places at the same time . It would have been discovered that one man can't be in multiple banks around Switzerland at the same time. See more »

Quotes

Reporter: Could you give us a statement please?
Inspector Jacques Clouseau: Yes. Chocolate makes one very thirsty.
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Crazy Credits

The opening credits are of an animated Inspector Clouseau pursuing a bank robber. See more »

Connections

Followed by Revenge of the Pink Panther (1978) See more »

User Reviews

 
Pitiful
15 January 2003 | by frankfobSee all my reviews

Comparisons between Alan Arkin and Peter Sellers may be unfair, but let's face it, there's no way they're not going to be made, and when they are, Arkin unfortunately comes out on the short end of the stick. Sellers is so closely identified with the role of Jacques Clouseau that it's doubtful if ANYONE could have succeeded in playing him. Arkin actually wasn't a bad choice, though, when you get down to it. His comic talents have been proved time and again, he bears a close enough resemblance to Sellers to make die-hard Sellers fans comfortable, and the script is by two veteran "Pink Panther" writers.

So why is it such a complete dog?

Much of the blame can be laid at the feet of director Bud Yorkin, who completely botched the job, but the script is no prize, either; maybe the Waldmans didn't have their heart in it because Sellers wasn't doing it (or maybe Sellers and/or Blake Edwards had more input into the scripts of their films than anyone realized). Part of it is that Arkin doesn't have anyone of the caliber of the great Herbert Lom as Inspector Dreyfuss to work off of, or even a top-notch character actor like Graham Stark as Hercule, Clouseau's much-put-upon assistant. But I think a lot of the reason is, unfortunately, Arkin himself. Sellers' Clouseau was a catalyst for the disasters that inevitably befell him; he CAUSED most of his own problems without ever realizing it. To him they were just minor setbacks on the way to solving the case he was working on, because he was so thoroughly convinced of his own abilities--which, as we all knew, were virtually nonexistent--that he knew beyond a doubt he would solve the case and become the hero, which he usually did. You felt comfortable laughing at Sellers' Clouseau because, for all his bluster and misplaced conceit, you actually liked him. That's where Arkin's Clouseau fails. Whatever he is, he's not likable in the way that Sellers' Clouseau was, and doesn't engender the affection and sympathy the audience had for Sellers' Clouseau, despite his many failings.

While James Bond can go through several different actors' characterizations of him, there's really only one Inspector Jacques Clouseau, and that's Peter Sellers. Arkin tried, but he just couldn't do it. He shouldn't feel too bad, though; I don't think anyone could have.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

19 July 1968 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Inspector Clouseau See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

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