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The Great Silence (1968) Poster

Trivia

The film's ending, in which Silence, Pauline and the outlaws are murdered by Loco and his gang, was intended by Sergio Corbucci as an explicit reference to the deaths of Ernesto 'Che' Guevara and Malcolm X.
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This trivia item contains spoilers. Click to view
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The snow in the town of Snow Hill was created by gallons of shaving cream.
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According to Sergio Corbucci, Marcello Mastroianni gave him the idea of a mute gunfighter when the actor told him that he had always wanted to do a Western, but unfortunately didn't speak English. When Corbucci first met Jean-Louis Trintignant, he learned that he didn't speak English either. Because he had a fascination with characters with a crippling weakness, Corbucci decided that this was the moment to turn the taciturn Spaghetti Western hero into a mute.
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Silence's distinctive rapid-firing pistol is the 7.63mm Mauser C96, nicknamed the "Broomhandle" for its distinctive wooden grip. The pistol was first produced in 1896, two years before the events of the film.
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Remade as a Japanese Samurai TV series starring Shintarô Katsu (1973).
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Jean-Louis Trintignant had agreed to do the film in order to help out co-producer Robert Dorfmann, who was a friend of his.
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The film's Italian trailer includes an appraisal of the film attributed to 20th Century Fox (the film's distributor in Italy and other territories) co-founder Darryl F. Zanuck, which reads: ''Il migliore western all'italiana degli ultimi tempi'' (The best Spaghetti Western of recent times). In reality, Zanuck was offended by the film's grim ending, and refused to release it in the United States.
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Loco's characterization is partially based on Gorca, the vampire played by Boris Karloff in Black Sabbath (1963).
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The opening credits state that this film is Vonetta McGee's "first time on screen." It was, in fact, her second--Faustina (1968), which was her second film role, was released before this film was.
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In publicity photos, Loco is shown holding a "WANTED" poster of an outlaw named Manuel Vasquez, a character who is not seen in the film. The poster is, in fact, a leftover prop from 10,000 Dollars for a Massacre (1967), in which Vasquez is a character played by Claudio Camaso. In The Great Silence (1968) itself, Vasquez's face on the poster is kept out of view.
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(English-language version) Loco's statement to Miguel's mother that they kill bandits for their "bread and butter" contrasts with Pollicut's sarcastic statement that the bandits have to be "fought with bread and butter" at the advice of Sheriff Burnett.
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

Body count: 43, including 11 kills by Jean-Louis Trintignant, 8 by Klaus Kinski, 1 by Bruno Corazzari and 1 by Remo De Angelis. Twenty people die in the final massacre.
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Sergio Corbucci reluctantly filmed a less tragic ending for some overseas markets, but it was still not shown in US and UK cinemas.
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