6.8/10
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The Devil's Brigade (1968)

Approved | | Action, Drama, War | 2 August 1968 (UK)
A US Army Colonel is tasked with forming an elite commando-style unit from crack Canadian troops and the dregs of the US Army.

Director:

Andrew V. McLaglen

Writers:

William Roberts (screenplay), Robert H. Adleman (based on the book by) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
William Holden ... Lt. Col. Robert T. Frederick
Cliff Robertson ... Maj. Alan Crown
Vince Edwards ... Maj. Cliff Bricker
Andrew Prine ... Pvt. Theodore Ransom
Jeremy Slate ... Sgt. Pat O'Neill
Claude Akins ... Pvt. Rocky Rockman
Jack Watson ... Cpl. Peacock
Richard Jaeckel ... Pvt. Omar Greco
Bill Fletcher ... Pvt. Bronc Guthrie
Richard Dawson ... Pvt. Hugh MacDonald
Tom Troupe ... Pvt. Al Manella
Luke Askew ... Pvt. Hubert Hixon
Jean-Paul Vignon ... Pvt. Henri Laurent
Tom Stern Tom Stern ... Capt. Cardwell
Harry Carey Jr. ... Capt. Rose (as Harry Carey)
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Storyline

During World War II, a special fighting unit is formed that combines a crack Canadian Army unit and a conglomeration of U.S. Army misfits who had previously served time in military jails. After an initial period of conflict between the two groups, their enmity turns to respect and friendship, and the unit is sent Italy to attempt a dangerous mission that has heretofore been considered impossible to carry out. Written by Doug Sederberg <vornoff@sonic.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

What they did to each other was nothing compared to what they did to the enemy!

Genres:

Action | Drama | War

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

According to the DVD back cover, "The U.S. Department of Defense provided 300 members of the Utah National Guard to play soldiers in the mass battle scenes filmed on Wasatch Mountain." See more »

Goofs

The U.S. enlisted personnel in the First Special Service Force were not criminals and the unwanted of other units. Lt. Col. Frederick kept recruitment for the Force limited to volunteers with "outdoors" backgrounds suitable for the special missions the force was envisioned for. See more »

Quotes

Pvt. Hugh MacDonald: [the soldiers are looking at William Holden as he leaves, having addressed them prior to the big battle] "Have you never heard a man say goodbye?"
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Crazy Credits

The copyright date in the opening credits is MCMXLVIII, which would be 1948, not 1968, when the film was actually produced. See more »

Alternate Versions

The TV version of the film plays with subtitles for the Germans; the video version dosen't include subtitles. See more »

Connections

References The Longest Day (1962) See more »

Soundtracks

Scotland the Brave
(uncredited)
Traditional
Heard several times as a theme, including as the troops approach Santa Elia and during the action there, and at Frederick's birthday
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User Reviews

 
The Fighting Devils
10 September 2006 | by bkoganbingSee all my reviews

When The Devil's Brigade first came out it got panned by a lot of critics in that it was too similar to The Dirty Dozen. Never mind that it was based on some real figures, the consensus was that The Devil's Brigade was a poor imitation of The Dirty Dozen. Personally I think it was a better film.

I'm sure that the characters and incidents were given a lot of poetic license, but that was to make it entertaining. And entertaining it is. But it's also inspiring, especially in the last battle sequence, taking that hill by going up the hard way.

When Bill Holden was cast as real life Lieutenant Colonel Robert Frederick, Mrs. Frederick was interviewed and said while she admired Mr. Holden's talent, she thought her husband was more the Gregory Peck type. Nevertheless Holden does a fine job as a man who shoots down Lord Louis Mountbatten's idea of a combined American/Canadian special force and then gets command of it. He's also a staff officer who had not seen combat and he was trying to prove something to himself.

As good as Holden is, the best performance in this film has to be that of Cliff Robertson as Canadian Major Alan Crown. Robertson's an Ulster Irishman in the film and his acting and accent are impeccable. He's got something to prove as well, he and many of his Canadians left Europe at Dunkirk. Robertson himself was off his Oscar winning performance in Charly and The Devil's Brigade was a good follow up for him.

The Canadians selected for this unit are the pick of the lot, while the Americans emptied their stockades of all the refuse. Holden encourages competition among them and a really terrific sequence involving a bar brawl with some obnoxious lumberjacks welds a camaraderie among former feudees.

Standing out in the cast are Claude Akins as a particularly rambunctious American recruit and Jack Watson as the Canadian sergeant. They bond particularly close, some might even infer some homosexuality here, but Watson's death scene and Akins's reactions are particularly poignant.

The Devil's Brigade also came out during the Viet-nam War and war films were not well received at that time, at least until Patton came out. Seen now though, The Devil's Brigade is a fine tribute to the Canadians and Americans who made up the First Special Service Force.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | German

Release Date:

2 August 1968 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

The Devil's Brigade See more »

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$8,000,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Wolper Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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