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The Charge of the Light Brigade (1968)

PG-13 | | Drama, History, War | 11 October 1968 (USA)
In 1854, during the Crimean War, poor planning leads to the British Light Brigade openly charging a Russian artillery position with tragic consequences.

Director:

Tony Richardson

Writers:

Charles Wood (screenplay), Cecil Woodham-Smith (additional source material "The Reason Why") (as Cecil Woodham Smith)
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Nominated for 6 BAFTA Film Awards. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Trevor Howard ... Lord Cardigan
Vanessa Redgrave ... Clarissa Morris
John Gielgud ... Lord Raglan
Harry Andrews ... Lord Lucan
Jill Bennett ... Mrs. Duberly
David Hemmings ... Capt. Lewis Nolan
Ben Aris Ben Aris ... Lt. Maxse
Micky Baker Micky Baker ... Trooper Metcalfe
Peter Bowles ... Paymaster Capt. Duberly
Leo Britt Leo Britt ... Gen. Scarlett
Mark Burns ... Caplt. Morris
John J. Carney ... Trooper Mitchell (as John Carney)
Helen Cherry ... Lady Scarlett
Christopher Chittell ... Trooper
Ambrose Coghill Ambrose Coghill ... Lt. Col. Douglas
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Storyline

A chronicle of events that led to the British involvement in the Crimean War against Russia and which led to the siege of Sevastopol and the fierce Battle of Balaclava on October 25, 1854 which climaxed with the heroic, but near-disastrous cavalry charge made by the British Light Brigade against a Russian artillery battery in a small valley which resulted in the near-destruction of the brigade due to error of judgment and rash planning on part by the inept British commanders. Written by matt-282

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Taglines:

"Theirs not to reason why..."

Genres:

Drama | History | War

Certificate:

PG-13 | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Special props included 3,000 concrete cannon balls, 3,000 rubber bayonets,5 gallons of imitation blood, 400 foam rubber 'dead men' figures, 500 stuffed dead horses, and a Russian army of 2,000 cut out figures to be propped up on the horizon. See more »

Goofs

Following the Sergeant Major's flogging, when Nolan, Cardigan, & the other officers are walking beneath the breezeway, a modern overhead electric lamp and its outdoor cord covers are clearly visible overhead. See more »

Quotes

Lord Cardigan: [during the Battle of the Alma] Lucan, you're a stewstick.
Lord Lucan aka George Charles Bingham: Fetch off!
Lord Cardigan: Poltroon.
Lord Lucan aka George Charles Bingham: Bum-roll!
Lord Cardigan: Why don't you draw your horse from round your ears? Bring your head out of his arse.
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Crazy Credits

Closing credits roll over a drawing of a dead horse, with the buzzing of flies in the soundtrack. See more »

Alternate Versions

Although the cinema version was complete the 1993 UK video release was cut by 7 secs to edit footage of horse-falls. The 2008 Optimum DVD has the cuts length extended to 14 secs and features the 6 minutes shorter print as mentioned below. See more »


Soundtracks

From Greenland's Icy Mountains
(uncredited)
Music by Lowell Mason
Arranged by John Addison
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User Reviews

Superb period details
3 November 2004 | by vaughan-birbeckSee all my reviews

We have to wait nearly two hours for the eponymous event which climaxes this film. Prior to this we see a series of apparently unconnected episodes which give the viewer an insight into the workings of Victorian society, including anti-intellectuallism and idleness among the 'upper' classes, and brutality and theft among the 'scum' recruited in the slums.

While almost plot less this section of the film does follow a core of characters whose lives are connected by army service. The main character is Captain Louis Nolan, an idealistic professional in an army of amateurs. "England is looking well" he says in the first scene of the film. The irony is that the country that looks so good is a cruel and mismanaged place. Unlike his fellow officers, who have bought their posts, he has worked his way up the ranks of the Indian Army by merit. He despises them and they feel he isn't a 'gentleman'.

Nolan has very definite views on how war should be fought. Faced with the reality of battle and the inadequacies of the commanders (the senile Raglan and the childish Lucan and Cardigan) his impatience and temper have tragic consequences as he impetuously points the Light Brigade ("There, my Lord, is your enemy, there are your guns!") towards the bloody fiasco of which he is the first victim. The man who seems to know best makes the biggest blunder of all. Eye-witnesses said the hideous scream Nolan gave when he was hit stayed with them all their lives and the film re-creates it in a truly chilling way.

Although the film does reflect 1960's attitudes to war and politics (and I actually prefer these to the attitudes of the 21st Century) its setting is so perfectly realized that it hasn't dated as a '60s film'. In fact it seems better with the passage of time. If you can free yourself from the idea of a narrative history and give yourself up to a series of impressions which add new layers of understanding 'Charge of the Light Brigade' makes a fine historical film.


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English | French | Russian

Release Date:

11 October 1968 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Charge of the Light Brigade See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$8,000,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (theatrical)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

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