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Christopher Nolan’s Favorite Movies: 30 Films the Director Wants You to See

Christopher Nolan’s Favorite Movies: 30 Films the Director Wants You to See
Christopher Nolan has become of the the most celebrated directors working in Hollywood since launching his career in 1998 with the neo-noir crime thriller “Following” and breaking through two years later with “Memento.” All of Nolan’s movies are influenced by the films he holds closest to his heart, whether it’s a 1927 classic from F. W. Murnau laying the groundwork for “Dunkirk” or science-fiction classics like “2001: A Space Odyssey” providing a backbone for “Interstellar.”

With Nolan currently at work on his next feature, the 2020 action epic “Tenet,” IndieWire takes a look at some of the films the writer-director credits with changing his outlook on cinema. Below are 30 titles Nolan encourages moviegoers to watch, and why, in his own words.
See full article at Indiewire »

Heathers Week: Screenwriter Daniel Waters Talks Writing the “Teen Film of All Teen Films”

When it comes to Michael Lehmann’s Heathers, there are a myriad of reasons why the brutally dark comedy works as well as it does, and has more than earned its cult film status over the last three decades, but probably one of its greatest assets is the film’s razor-sharp script penned by a then up-and-coming screenwriter Daniel Waters. And while he had always been fueled by his love of cinema, Waters didn’t initially set out to write screenplays in Hollywood.

“Originally, I wanted to be a film critic because I love movies so much,” Daniel explained. “But what I began to realize was that when it came to the movies that were coming out during the ’80s, I just felt like the movies of the ’70s were much better. Also, I was obsessed with the films of Stanley Kubrick, who directed these completely cold and clinical, but brilliant dark comedies like Dr.
See full article at DailyDead »

‘The Matrix’ 20 Years Later: The Artificial Intelligence Lives in Us (Column)

  • Variety
‘The Matrix’ 20 Years Later: The Artificial Intelligence Lives in Us (Column)
The term “artificial intelligence” was coined in 1956, but one way or another it has been the subject of just about every great science-fiction movie, from “Metropolis” to “Frankenstein,” from the paranoid fables of the ’50s (about brainy robots and aliens with giant noggins who were like “advanced” versions of ourselves) to “2001: A Space Odyssey,” in which Hal, the computer who talks like a wounded therapy patient, displays the anger and ego of a jilted human being. And by the late ’70s and early ’80s, the Machines Who Could Think were really taking over. “Alien” featured a technologically evolved monster with the metallic jaws, the helmet head, and the relentlessness of a demonic thresher, the most sympathetic character in “Blade Runner” was a replicant, and “The Terminator” gave us a dystopia ruled by the machines, featuring a weaponized badass who was the ultimate programmed destroyer.

But in “The Matrix,” the
See full article at Variety »

‘The Lego Movie 2’ Review: Everything Is Still Awesome-ish, Kind Of

‘The Lego Movie 2’ Review: Everything Is Still Awesome-ish, Kind Of
Remember when The Lego Movie came out in 2014, and how we all thought it would be the cinematic equivalent of cheap plastic — only to end up laughing our asses off at how meta-clever it was at skewering brand culture? And remember how, in 2017, The Lego Batman Movie turned out to be almost as fantastic because Will Arnett voiced the Dark Knight as such a delusional, egomaniacal freak? (We’ll kindly skip over The Lego Ninjago Movie, which was such a repetitive bummer.)

So is The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Sundance Film Review: ‘Apollo 11’

  • Variety
Sundance Film Review: ‘Apollo 11’
Progress — scientific, technological, evolutionary — works, more or less, in a straight line. The Industrial Revolution happened, and that gave birth to the 20th century. The Wright Brothers happened, and not too long after that we had an airline industry. On July 20, 1969, we landed, and then walked, on the lunar surface, and then…well, in the case of this most spectacular of technological adventures, not so much happened after that. No moon colony. No discovery of life on Mars. No science-fiction movies like “2001: A Space Odyssey” coming to life by the year 2001 (though we do now have video phones!).

I exaggerate (a bit). The visionary ingenuity of the space program gave rise to oodles of the technology that is now burned into the fabric of our lives. And as far as space travel is concerned…who knows? Who knows when, in the distant future, man’s attempt to visit the moon will somehow “pay off,
See full article at Variety »

Steve Carell, ‘Office’ Creator Reunite for Netflix Workplace Comedy ‘Space Force’ – Right, That Space Force (Video)

  • The Wrap
Steve Carell, ‘Office’ Creator Reunite for Netflix Workplace Comedy ‘Space Force’ – Right, That Space Force (Video)
Steve Carell and Greg Daniels are reuniting — but not to reboot “The Office.” The star of the workplace comedy and the creator of said workplace comedy are reteaming to bring you a new workplace comedy for Netflix called “Space Force.”

Per the project’s official logline, “Space Force” is a “workplace comedy centered around the people tasked with creating a sixth branch of the armed services…Space Force.”

Yes, they’re talking about that Space Force, created by the Trump administration.

Also Read: Elon Musk Likes President Trump's 'Cool' Space Force

Netflix released a brief announcement video on Wednesday, which included this text, projected over footage of space and set to the theme from “2001: A Space Odyssey”:

“On June 18, 2018, the federal government announced the creation of a 6th major division of the United States Armed Forces. The goal of the new branch is ‘to defend satellites from attack’ and ‘perform other space-related tasks.
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Lawrence of Arabia’ Tops Asc List of 10 Best-Shot Films of the 20th Century

The American Society of Cinematographers (Asc) celebrates its 100th anniversary on Tuesday by unveiling two lists devoted to 20th century visual achievements: the 100 Milestone Films and the top 10 Best-Shot Films, led by “Lawrence of Arabia” (1962), shot by Oscar-winning cinematographer Freddie Young.

The rest of the Top 10 list includes sci-fi classics “2001: A Space Odyssey” (1968), shot by Geoffrey Unsworth, and “Blade Runner” (1982), shot by Jordan Cronenweth; two from director Francis Ford Coppola: “The Godfather” (1972), shot by Gordon Willis, and “Apocalypse Now” (1979), shot by Oscar-winner Vittorio Storaro; two black-and-white entries: “Citizen Kane” (1941), shot by Gregg Toland, and “Raging Bull” (1980), shot by Michael Chapman; “Days of Heaven” (1978), shot by Oscar winner Néstor Almendros; and “The French Connection” (1971), shot by five-time Oscar nominee Owen Roizman.

Alas, there are no silent movies in the top 10. And there’s no representation of the ’30s; ‘the ’50s; or the ’90s.

The lists were voted on by
See full article at Indiewire »

Film News Roundup: Jodie Foster to Direct, Star in Remake of Icelandic Thriller

  • Variety
Film News Roundup: Jodie Foster to Direct, Star in Remake of Icelandic Thriller
In today’s film news roundup, Jodie Foster is remaking Iceland’s “Woman at War,” the Art Directors Guild honors production designers Anthony Masters and Ben Carre, “47 Meters Down: Uncaged” gets cast and Melissa Takal directs “New Year New You” for Hulu.

Project Announcement

Jodie Foster will direct, co-produce and star in an English-language remake of the thriller “Woman at War,” Iceland’s submission to the Foreign Language competition at the upcoming 91st Academy Awards.

The Icelandic movie centers on a music teacher who’s escalating her sabotage against the local aluminum industry when she discovers that her adoption application has been approved and a baby girl is awaiting her in the Ukraine. The script won the best script prize in the Critics’ Week section of the Cannes Film Festival.

Foster plans to relocate the setting to the American West. It will be her fifth directorial gig following “Money Monster,
See full article at Variety »

Varèse Sarabande, King of the Soundtrack Labels, Still Keeping Score at 40

  • Variety
Varèse Sarabande, renowned as Hollywood’s preeminent soundtrack label, celebrates its 40th anniversary this year, going into its fifth decade under new ownership — Concord Music acquired the label in February — while renewing its goal of presenting the best of movie and TV music, both current and past.

According to label VP and veteran producer Robert Townson, Varèse’s mandate hasn’t changed. It’s all about “focusing on the big picture, maintaining a role in the community and standing by the next generation of composers,” Townson says. “The entire history of Varèse is about taking calculated gambles, maintaining an artistic integrity and releasing scores even when we knew we were going to lose money.”

Townson should know. He has produced more than 1,400 soundtracks since his association with the label began 32 years ago. As an ambitious 19-year-old in Whitby, Ontario, he launched his Masters Film Music label to provide a home
See full article at Variety »

Wizard of Oz Beats Star Wars to Be Named Most Influential Movie of All Time — See the Full List!

The most influential movie has officially been named.

Researchers at the University of Turin in Italy have given the title to Wizard of Oz after studying more than 47,000 movies, according to Yahoo! The movie was crowned the winner after findings showed it had the most references made to it in other movies, and the most spin-offs.

According to the study, Oz beat Star Wars and Psycho, which came in second and third, as well as fourth and fifth place finishers King Kong and 2001: A Space Odyssey.

“We propose an alternative method to box office takings, which are affected by
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Hans Zimmer, Alexandre Desplat, and Terence Blanchard Lead Original Score Oscar Contenders

  • Indiewire
Hans Zimmer, Alexandre Desplat, and Terence Blanchard Lead Original Score Oscar Contenders
This season the Academy instituted a new shortlist procedure for Best Original Score and Song in order to open up the field to more newcomers. Among the standout scores in contention this year are experimental and modern “Black Panther” (Ludwig Göransson), “If Beale Street Could Talk” (“Moonlight” Oscar nominee Nicholas Britell), and “BlacKkKlansman” (Terence Blanchard). Returning nominees could include Oscar-winners Justin Hurwitz (“First Man”), Hans Zimmer (“Widows”), and Alexandre Desplat (“Isle of Dogs”).

The top most likely Oscar contenders are listed below in alphabetical order.

BlacKkKlansman

In Spike Lee’s adaptation of the true story of African-American cop Ron Stallworth (John David Washington) infiltrating the Kkk in Colorado Springs in ’72, composer Blanchard applied his jazz, symphonic, and R&B influences into the eclectic score. “Because I’m an African-American and a musician, that story has been with me damn near all my life,” he said. “But in order for me to do the best job,
See full article at Indiewire »

Cinelinx's Movie- Lovers Gift Guide (2018)

  • Cinelinx
It’s that time of year again when the weather gets cold, and the Christmas decorating/shopping has begun. If you have movie lovers, gamers, or nerds in general, on your shopping list the Cinelinx team is here to help you find the perfect gift with our annual gift guides. Come inside for links to the best movie related gifts you can find!

Like many of you, we here at Cinelinx can't believe it's already that time of year to be thinking about Holiday shopping, but here we are! As we’ve done in years past, our team is here to help with your shopping needs with Three separate gift guides.

We’re kicking it all off with our gift guide for movie lovers, so let’s dive right in (but don't forget the Ultimate gift for movie fans...Cinelinx: The Game):

Garrett

2018 has been another solid year for movies,
See full article at Cinelinx »

Douglas Rain, Actor Who Voiced Hal in ‘2001: A Space Odyssey,’ Dies at 90

  • The Wrap
Douglas Rain, Actor Who Voiced Hal in ‘2001: A Space Odyssey,’ Dies at 90
Douglas Rain, the Canadian-born actor best known as the voice of Hal 9000 in “2001: A Space Odyssey” and its sequel “2010: The Year We Made Contact,” died Sunday at St. Marys Memorial Hospital in St. Mary’s, Ontario, according to CTV News. He was 90.

“Canadian theatre has lost one of its greatest talents and a guiding light in its development,” Stratford Festival artistic director Antoni Cimolino said in a release.

“Douglas Rain was that rare artist: an actor deeply admired by other actors. The voice of Hal in ‘2001: A Space Odyssey,’ Douglas shared many of the same qualities as Kubrick’s iconic creation: precision, strength of steel, enigma and infinite intelligence, as well as a wicked sense of humour.”

Also Read: 'First Reformed' and '2001: A Space Odyssey' Anniversary Blast Off at Indie Box Office

Cimolino continued: “But those of us lucky enough to have worked with Douglas
See full article at The Wrap »

Hollywood’s Scariest Film Trailers: Eli Roth Looks Back In Horror For Halloween

  • Deadline
Hollywood’s Scariest Film Trailers: Eli Roth Looks Back In Horror For Halloween
Exclusive Not only can a scary horror film trailer lead to an opening weekend that leaves a film profitable by Monday, great trailers can achieve immortality of their own. Unforgettably jarring trailers for The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, The Ring, Halloween, The Shining, The Blair Witch Project, Psycho and Paranormal Activity carved out their own place in the consciousness of moviegoers.

Halloween is upon us and this year the holiday has an old-school feel with two classic names (Halloween and Suspiria) scaring-up new business in theaters. What better time to revisit vintage horror film trailers? For grisly guidance, I turned to Eli Roth and asked him to share a list of his favorites, be they iconic or obscure. Roth directed the Hostel franchise, The Green Inferno and Cabin Fever; he’s also brained Nazis with a Louisville Slugger in Inglourious Basterds and taken his scare formula to PG audiences with The House With a Clock In Its Walls
See full article at Deadline »

Review: "Kubrick’S Music: Selections From The Films Of Stanley Kubrick"

  • CinemaRetro
By Darren Allison

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For anyone with a remote interest in soundtrack music, they will probably have some knowledge of how difficult it is to secure the rights to Stanley Kubrick’s film music. Permission has been basically refused and the whole issue is generally tied up in a bundle of tightly wrapped red tape.

Whilst there is still a great demand for these scores, the slow and unsuccessful process has left the fan base both frustrated and in limbo. It’s not that there hasn’t been a gallant effort; fans/producers such as the respected and much admired Nick Redman have taken up the challenge, but alas to no avail. As a result, the Kubrick soundtrack sagas remain something of an impregnable and stubborn wall to penetrate.

I can’t therefore condemn entirely the efforts of some labels and their attempts to
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The Casual Cinecast Revisits 2001: A Space Odyssey on its 50th Anniversary!

  • Cinelinx
Stanley Kubrick's wholly original sci-fi opera, 2001: A Space Odyssey, has been re-released on its 50th Anniversary! The Casual Cinecast revisits the film on the big screen! 

If you don't know by now (then you should listen to The Casual Cinecast more), the show starts out with the What's On Our Minds segment where the guys talk about what film and television they've been watching for the past week! Mike checked out the Rachel McAdams and Rachel Weisz starring drama Disobedience. Justin followed his love of the Jackass franchise into the bizarre film that is Action Point which stars Johnny Knoxville and Chris Pontius, plus binged the new Amazon Prime series All or Nothing: Manchester City which follows the English Premiere League soccer (football) team for an entire season. Chris got around to watching American Animals starring Evan Peters and Ann Dowd, directed by Bart Layton. He also binged
See full article at Cinelinx »

Kubrick's "2001: A Space Odyssey" To Be Screened In IMAX

  • CinemaRetro
The web site www.in70mm.com  reports that Warner Bros will be screening Stanley Kubrick's classic "2001: A Space Odyssey" in the IMAX format for the first time at 350 North American theaters for one week only, commencing August 24. Four key theaters will be showing the film in IMAX 70mm, thus making this the ultmate viewing experience for fans of the landmark film.  Click here for more details.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Stanley Kubrick’s ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ Gets First Imax Release

  • Variety
Stanley Kubrick’s ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ Gets First Imax Release
Stanley Kubrick’s sci-fi epic “2001: A Space Odyssey” is heading back to the big screen.

In honor of its 50th anniversary, Warner Bros. is releasing the film in Imax in 350 theaters for a one-week limited engagement, starting on Aug. 24. An unrestored 70mm version will be shown in Imax in four venues in Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, and Toronto. Tickets go on sale Friday.

Christopher Nolan recently oversaw “2001: A Space Odyssey’s” restoration in 70mm print, but this is the first time it will be offered in Imax.

“2001: A Space Odyssey” follows Keir Dullea and Gary Lockwood as astronauts on a journey to Jupiter with the computer Hal 9000 after the discovery of a mysterious black monolith with a profound effect on human evolution. Since it debuted on April 4, 1968, it is widely considered to be one of the most influential films ever made — a landmark both in
See full article at Variety »

Lost Stanley Kubrick Screenplay ‘Burning Secret’ From 1956 Unearthed

  • The Wrap
Lost Stanley Kubrick Screenplay ‘Burning Secret’ From 1956 Unearthed
A lost, unfinished script written by Stanley Kubrick in 1956 called “Burning Secret” has been found in Wales, and is so close to completion that it could be made into a feature film.

According to The Guardian, the screenplay was found by Nathan Abrams, a professor of film at Bangor University in Wales, who says he came across it while doing research for his upcoming book about Kubrick’s final film, “Eyes Wide Shut.”

Also Read: Is There More to 'The Shining'? 'Long Cuts' of Kubrick Film up for Auction in Italy

The script is dated October 24, 1956 — one year before he found his breakthrough hit with the Kirk Douglas antiwar film “Paths of Glory” — and bears the stamp of MGM’s script department. Kubrick moved to the U.K. in 1961 after becoming disillusioned with the Hollywood system, and many of his personal writings are archived there.

“I couldn’t believe it.
See full article at The Wrap »

Steve Martin Discusses Being Pitched ‘Eyes Wide Shut’ By Stanley Kubrick

Welcome to #FlashbackFriday, where we look at past moments with filmmakers, actors, etc. and highlight something in cinema history that’s fascinating, amusing, perhaps something you never knew or have seen, you name it.

Earlier this week, we were able to share a never-before-seen interview with Stanley Kubrick, where he broke down the ending of the masterpiece “2001: A Space Odyssey.” Well, now another piece of Kubrick history has shown up on our radar, and we decided to make it this week’s #FlashbackFriday.

Continue reading Steve Martin Discusses Being Pitched ‘Eyes Wide Shut’ By Stanley Kubrick at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »
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