After discovering a mysterious artifact buried beneath the Lunar surface, mankind sets off on a quest to find its origins with help from intelligent supercomputer H.A.L. 9000.

Director:

Stanley Kubrick

Writers:

Stanley Kubrick (screenplay by), Arthur C. Clarke (screenplay by)
Popularity
610 ( 155)
Top Rated Movies #89 | Won 1 Oscar. Another 15 wins & 11 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Keir Dullea ... Dr. Dave Bowman
Gary Lockwood ... Dr. Frank Poole
William Sylvester ... Dr. Heywood R. Floyd
Daniel Richter ... Moon-Watcher
Leonard Rossiter ... Dr. Andrei Smyslov
Margaret Tyzack ... Elena
Robert Beatty ... Dr. Ralph Halvorsen
Sean Sullivan ... Dr. Bill Michaels
Douglas Rain ... HAL 9000 (voice)
Frank Miller Frank Miller ... Mission Controller (voice)
Bill Weston ... Astronaut
Ed Bishop ... Aries-1B Lunar Shuttle Captain (as Edward Bishop)
Glenn Beck ... Astronaut
Alan Gifford ... Poole's Father
Ann Gillis ... Poole's Mother

Director's Trademarks: A Guide to Stanley Kubrick's Films

2001: A Space Odyssey and Eyes Wide Shut are just the beginning of Stanley Kubrick's legacy. Are you up to speed on the film icon's style?

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Storyline

"2001" is a story of evolution. Sometime in the distant past, someone or something nudged evolution by placing a monolith on Earth (presumably elsewhere throughout the universe as well). Evolution then enabled humankind to reach the moon's surface, where yet another monolith is found, one that signals the monolith placers that humankind has evolved that far. Now a race begins between computers (HAL) and human (Bowman) to reach the monolith placers. The winner will achieve the next step in evolution, whatever that may be. Written by Larry Cousins

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Man's colony on the Moon... a whole new generation has been born and is living there... a quarter-million miles from Earth. See more »

Genres:

Adventure | Sci-Fi

Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Apart from hiring and firing Frank Cordell and Alex North, Kubrick also called in Edwin Astley according to the composer's son Jon Astley in a 2008 interview. Kubrick showed Astley the completed film with the temporary music track derived from classical records and said he wanted the music to sound "like that." Astley said, if you like "that" so much, why don't you use it? And Kubrick did. See more »

Goofs

The bone Moon-Watcher uses to beat the enemy ape is a femur (upper leg bone), as indicated by the sideways projecting "arm" with a ball at the end. However, the bone shown rotating in the air is a tibia (main bone of the lower leg), as indicated by its blunt ends. See more »

Quotes

Interviewer: HAL, you have an enormous responsibility on this mission, in many ways perhaps the greatest responsibility of any single mission element. You're the brain, and central nervous system of the ship, and your responsibilities include watching over the men in hibernation. Does this ever cause you any lack of confidence?
HAL: Let me put it this way, Mr. Amor. The 9000 series is the most reliable computer ever made. No 9000 computer has ever made a mistake or distorted information. We are all, by any ...
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Crazy Credits

"Thus Spake Zarathustra" is the only musical piece in the film whose conductor and orchestra are not mentioned in the closing credits. For all other pieces, the orchestra which plays it, and the conductor who leads it, are given screen credit. See more »

Alternate Versions

Most current video versions contain the 139-minute general release version plus the original overture, entr'acte, and exit music from the roadshow version. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976) See more »

Soundtracks

Off Beats Mood
(uncredited)
Performed by Sidney Torch
BBC segment opening theme.
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User Reviews

 
A film of monolithic proportions.
5 January 2005 | by ManthorpeSee all my reviews

A review I have put off for far too long....

Bluntly, 2001 is one of the best science-fiction films made to date, if not the very best. Stanley Kubrick was a genius of a film maker and this is one of his very best works. And although it is misunderstood by many, and respectively underrated, it is considered one of the best films of all time and I'll have to agree. Back in 1968, no one had done anything like this before, and no one has since. It was a marvel of a special effects breakthrough back then, and seeing how the effects hold up today, it is no wonder as to why. The film still looks marvelous after almost forty years! Take note CGI people. Through the use of large miniatures and realistic lighting, Kubrick created some of the best special effects ever put on celluloid. This aspect alone almost single-handedly created the chilling void of the space atmosphere which is also attributed to the music and realistic sound effects. I can't think of another film where you can't here anything in space, like it is in reality. Not only is the absence of sound effects in space realistic, it is used cleverly as a tool to establish mood, and it works flawlessly.

Aside from the magnificent display of ingenious special effects, there are other factors that play a part in establishing the feel of the film. The music played, all classical, compliment what the eyes are seeing and make you feel the significance of man's journey through his evolution from ape to space traveler.

The story, while seemingly simple, is profound. Sequentially, several mysterious black monoliths are discovered and basically trigger certain events integral to the film. What are they? Where did they come from? What do they do? These are all questions one asks oneself while watching the story develop and is asked to find his own way. While most come away with a general idea of what took place in the story, each individual will have to decide what it means to them. Any way one decides to answer these question results in profound solutions. It's not left entirely up to interpretation, but in some aspects it is. Experience it for more clarification. The end result is quite chilling, no matter your personal solution.

While it is a long film, and sometimes slows down, it has to be in order to accurately portray the journey of man. It's not a subject that would have faired well in a shorter film, faster paced feature. Those with short attention spans need not apply.

Last but not least, is the epitome of a remorseless antagonist, HAL 9000, the computer. Never has a machine held such a chilling screen presence. Which reminds me, for a film with such profound ambition and execution, there is surprisingly little dialogue. Another sign of Kubrick's genius.

All in all, one of the best films made to date and one of the very best science fiction films made. A personal favorite. Everyone must see this film at least once.

Very highly recommended.


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Details

Official Sites:

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Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English | Russian

Release Date:

24 June 1970 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Journey Beyond the Stars See more »

Filming Locations:

Spitzkoppe, Erongo, Namibia See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$12,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$202,759, 20 May 2018

Gross USA:

$60,405,931

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$65,783,882
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (theatrical release) | (initial release)

Sound Mix:

4-Track Stereo (35 mm magnetic prints)| 70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints)| DTS (DTS HD Master Audio 5.1)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)| Color (Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.20 : 1
See full technical specs »

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