7.4/10
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44 user 8 critic

The 25th Hour (1967)

La vingt-cinquième heure (original title)
Not Rated | | Drama, War | 26 April 1967 (France)
In World War II, a Romanian gentile peasant is denounced by the village gendarme and sent to a concentration camp for Jews where, due to an error, he's drafted into the S.S.

Director:

Henri Verneuil
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Anthony Quinn ... Johann Moritz
Virna Lisi ... Suzanna Moritz
Grégoire Aslan ... Dobresco
Michael Redgrave ... Defense Lawyer
Marcel Dalio ... Strul (as Dalio)
Jan Werich ... Sgt. Constantin
Harold Goldblatt Harold Goldblatt ... Isaac Nagy
Alexander Knox ... D.A.
Liam Redmond ... Father Koruga
Meier Tzelniker Meier Tzelniker ... Abramovici
Kenneth J. Warren Kenneth J. Warren ... Insp. Varga
John Le Mesurier ... Tribunal President
Serge Reggiani ... Trajan Koruga
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Robert Ayres
Robert Beatty ... Col. Greenfield
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Storyline

During World War II, Johann Moritz (Anthony Quinn), a Romanian gentile peasant, whose pretty wife is lusted after by the village gendarme, is denounced as being Jewish, arrested, and sent to a concentration camp. In the camp, the camp commander mistakes him for a new recruit, a volunteer to the S.S. and he is drafted into the S.S. Ironically, after the war, he is detained by the Allied authorities for his wartime involvement with the S.S. Written by nufs68

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

He fought against both sides in the war to get back to the woman who was in his dreams and always beyond his reach! See more »

Genres:

Drama | War

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Jan Werich was dubbed. See more »

Goofs

Quinn's character is taken prisoner by the U.S. 24th Infantry Division in 1945. This couldn't have happened as the 24th was fighting in the Philippines at that time and would later be sent to Japan on occupation duties. See more »

Quotes

Johann Moritz: I keep forgetting, I'm not a prisoner.
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Connections

Referenced in Never a Dull Moment (1968) See more »

User Reviews

 
great depicting of east European life during the war
30 May 2005 | by aniaremereSee all my reviews

living in Romania, i was almost stunned by the very realistic setting for the scenes and the great care paid to local details by the director. The performance of Anthony Queen is absolutely great, and the rest of the cast does a great job supporting him. The movie does take a little knowledge of the east European context in order to be fully enjoyed, but it remains otherwise a great performance with some memorable lines. the ending is maybe a bit too melodramatic, but that's actually the way people are in this part of the world I believe the screenplay is great, because it presents the horrors of the 2nd WW in a most original manner - no blood, no battlefields. Still, lives are shattered, and the smiles you get every now and then throughout the movie are quickly killed by the war realities touching the characters.


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Details

Country:

France | Italy | Yugoslavia

Language:

French | English | Romanian

Release Date:

26 April 1967 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

The Twenty See more »

Filming Locations:

Romania See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (TCM print)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Color (Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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