Millie Dillmount comes to town in the roaring twenties to encounter flappers, sexuality, and white slavers.

Director:

George Roy Hill

Writer:

Richard Morris
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Julie Andrews ... Millie Dillmount
James Fox ... Jimmy Smith
Mary Tyler Moore ... Miss Dorothy Brown
Carol Channing ... Muzzy Van Hossmere
John Gavin ... Trevor Graydon
Jack Soo ... Oriental #1
Pat Morita ... Oriental #2
Philip Ahn ... Tea
Anthony Dexter ... Juarez
Cavada Humphrey Cavada Humphrey ... Miss Flannery
Herbie Faye ... Taxi Driver
Michael St. Clair Michael St. Clair ... Baron Richter
Lisabeth Hush ... Judith Tremaine
Ann Dee Ann Dee ... Singer
Beatrice Lillie ... Mrs. Meers
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Storyline

In 1922 New York City, Millie Dillmount (Dame Julie Andrews) and Miss Dorothy Brown (Mary Tyler Moore) are just two of the girls living at the Priscilla Hotel for Single Young Ladies run by Mrs. Meers (Beatrice Lillie). Orphaned, Miss Dorothy, just recently arrived, is a naive, old-fashioned girl from a seemingly privileged background who has aspirations to be a stage actress. From more modest means, Millie, in New York City for three months, used to be old-fashioned, but now has a new modern sensibility and look to match, complete with bobbed hair and dresses with hemlines above the knee. Included in this new modern sensibility is Millie's goal of getting a job as a stenographer, with a quick promotion to being her wealthy boss' "Mrs." Love is not to factor into the equation. She believes she's found the right employer in the form of chisel-jawed Trevor Graydon (John Gavin) of the Sincere Trust Insurance Company. Millie's pursuit of Mr. Graydon is despite the fact that Mr. Graydon ... Written by Huggo

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Taglines:

Here SHE is, the happiest star of all: singing, dancing, delighting. See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The first musical movie financed by Universal Pictures since Flower Drum Song (1961). See more »

Goofs

When Muzzy sings lower and lower notes it causes a martini glass to break suddenly. But glass is broken by its resonate frequency - the note it makes when it's rung by tapping it sharply. A much higher note than Muzzy's is needed to break a martini glass. See more »

Quotes

Millie Dillmount: I like you.
Jimmy Smith: And I like you, by jingo.
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Alternate Versions

On some video releases of Thoroughly Modern Millie, the Overture is cut out. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Carol Burnett Show: Episode #3.21 (1970) See more »

Soundtracks

Jimmy
Words & Music by Jay Thompson
Sung by Julie Andrews (uncredited)
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User Reviews

A Showcase for Julie
1 February 1999 | by dweckSee all my reviews

Hard for me to be objective, here, since I've been madly in love with Julie Andrews since being first exposed to her crystalline voice when I was three.

But I'll try: "Millie's" first half is, to quote the screenplay, "Delish," with Andrews vamping and camping throughout. I am unable to take my eyes off her as she clowns, flirts, cavorts, and also sings and dances (getting her hotel elevator to work results in a showstopper). The vehicle--a pastiche of 1920s conventions (including "moderns") and filmgoing techniques (including iris-outs and title cards)--is the frothy light story of a British import who comes to America and finds true love.

The second half gets bogged down in the overwrought script, with all the machinations of a white slavery plot and a pair of "inscrutible" Orientals who, in this day and age of racial sensitivity, get far worse than they deserve.

Some history: Ross Hunter, the producer, wanted to film "The Boy Friend," the Broadway musical that had introduced Andrews to the U.S. stage. When the rights were unavailable, he devised his own script, using the same setting--the 1920s. A "small" musical evolved.

Then Julie's star went through the stratosphere. And the Universal "suits," smelling another payday, insisted that the movie be a road-show presentation--with a road-show running time(and at which road-show prices could be charged). Little "Millie" had an intermission added, and her running time was increased considerably.

The movie's still a lot of fun and definitely recommendable (especially to Andrews fans), but let's just say that, at times, it more than shows its stretchmarks!


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Spanish | French | German | Italian | Hebrew

Release Date:

22 March 1967 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Thoroughly Modern Millie See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$6,000,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (roadshow)

Sound Mix:

70 mm 6-Track (Westrex Recording System) (70 mm prints)| Mono (35 mm prints)| 4-Track Stereo (35 mm magnetic prints)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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