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Guess Who's Coming to Dinner ()


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A couple's attitudes are challenged when their daughter introduces them to her African-American fiancé.

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Awards:
  • Won 2 Oscars. Another 9 wins & 22 nominations.
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Cast verified as complete

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Matt Drayton
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John Prentice
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Christina Drayton
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Joey Drayton
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Monsignor Ryan
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Mrs. Prentice
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Mr. Prentice (as Roy E. Glenn Sr.)
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Tillie (as Isabell Sanford)
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Hilary St. George
Alexandra Hay ...
Carhop
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Dorothy
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Frankie
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Peter
Grace Gaynor ...
Judith
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Delivery Boy
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Cab Driver
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Natalie Core ...
Small Role (uncredited)
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Singer (uncredited)
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Small Role (uncredited)
Yuki Tani ...
Japanese Waitress (uncredited)
June Whitley Taylor ...
Edie (uncredited) (voice)

Directed by

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Stanley Kramer

Written by

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William Rose ... (written by)

Produced by

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Georges Glass ... associate producer
Stanley Kramer ... producer

Music by

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Frank De Vol ... (as De Vol)

Cinematography by

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Sam Leavitt ... director of photography

Film Editing by

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Robert C. Jones

Editorial Department

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Tony Friedman ... assistant editor (uncredited)

Production Design by

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Robert Clatworthy

Set Decoration by

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Frank Tuttle

Makeup Department

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Joe DiBella ... makeup artist (as Joseph Di Bella)
Helen Hunt ... hair stylist
Ben Lane ... makeup artist

Production Management

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Ivan Volkman ... production supervisor

Second Unit Director or Assistant Director

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Ray Gosnell Jr. ... assistant director (as Ray Gosnell)
Leonard Kunody ... assistant director (uncredited)

Art Department

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Clarence Peet ... property master
Jim Bochman ... set designer (uncredited)
Will Ferrell ... scenic artist (uncredited)
Gabe Resh ... set designer (uncredited)

Sound Department

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Robert Martin ... sound
Clem Portman ... re-recording
Charles J. Rice ... sound
James F. Rogers ... boom operator (uncredited)

Special Effects by

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Geza Gaspar ... special effects

Visual Effects by

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Lawrence W. Butler ... process photography (as Larry Butler)

Stunts

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John Hudkins ... stunt double Spencer Tracy (uncredited)

Camera and Electrical Department

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Les Everson ... chief electrician
William Gossman ... camera operator
Martin Kashuk ... company grip (as Marty Kashuk)
Doug J. Campbell ... company grip (uncredited)
Ron Cooney ... grip (uncredited)
Darryl Kenzel ... assistant camera (uncredited)
John Monte ... still photographer (uncredited)

Costume and Wardrobe Department

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Joe King ... costumes
Jean Louis ... wardrobe supervisor
Edna Taylor ... wardrobe: women (uncredited)

Music Department

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Mike Deasy ... musician (uncredited)
Carol Kaye ... musician: bass (uncredited)
Albert Woodbury ... orchestrator (uncredited)

Other crew

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Marshall Schlom ... script supervisor
Wayne Fitzgerald ... title designer (uncredited)
Crew verified as complete

Production Companies

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Distributors

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Special Effects

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Other Companies

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Storyline

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Plot Summary

After a period of vacation in Hawaii, Joanna "Joey" Drayton returns to her parents' home in San Francisco bringing her fiancé, the high-qualified Dr. John Prentice, to introduce him to her mother Christina Drayton that owns an art gallery and her father Matt Drayton that is the publisher editor of the newspaper The Guardian. Joey was raised with a liberal education and intends to get married with Dr. John Prentice that is a black widower and needs to fly on that night to Geneva to work with the World Health Organization. Joey invites John's parents Mr. Prentice and Mrs. Prentice to have dinner with her family and the couple flies from Los Angeles to San Francisco without knowing that Joey is white. Christina invites also the liberal Monsignor Ryan, who is friend of her family. Along the day and night, the families discuss the problems of their son and daughter. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Keywords
Taglines a love story of today See more »
Genres
Parents Guide View content advisory »
Certification

Additional Details

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Also Known As
  • Devine qui vient dîner? (France)
  • Rat mal, wer zum Essen kommt (Germany)
  • Adivina quién viene esta noche (Spain)
  • Endevina qui ve a sopar (Spain, Catalan title)
  • Rat mal, wer zum Essen kommt (Austria)
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Runtime
  • 108 min
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Box Office

Budget $4,000,000 (estimated)

Did You Know?

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Trivia In the scene near the end where Spencer Tracy gives his memorable soliloquy, Katharine Hepburn can be seen crying in the background. This was not acting: she knew how gravely ill her longtime lover was and was moved by his remarks about how true love endures through the years. See more »
Goofs The car the Draytons are driving is a two-door sedan (with a pillar holding the roof up, and a full frame around the door glass) when seen in exterior shots. Once they're at the drive-in, it becomes a two-door hardtop (no pillar, and no frame around the glass). See more »
Movie Connections Edited into Starring Katharine Hepburn (1981). See more »
Soundtracks Glory of Love See more »
Quotes [last lines]
Matt Drayton: Now Mr. Prentice, clearly a most reasonable man, says he has no wish to offend me but wants to know if I'm some kind of a *nut*. And Mrs. Prentice says that like her husband I'm a burned-out old shell of a man who cannot even remember what it's like to love a woman the way her son loves my daughter. And strange as it seems, that's the first statement made to me all day with which I am prepared to take issue... cause I think you're wrong, you're as wrong as you can be. I admit that I hadn't considered it, hadn't even thought about it, but I know exactly how he feels about her and there is nothing, absolutely nothing that you son feels for my daughter that I didn't feel for Christina. Old- yes. Burned-out- certainly, but I can tell you the memories are still there- clear, intact, indestructible, and they'll be there if I live to be 110. Where John made his mistake I think was in attaching so much importance to what her mother and I might think... because in the final analysis it doesn't matter a damn what we think. The only thing that matters is what they feel, and how much they feel, for each other. And if it's half of what we felt- that's everything. As for you two and the problems you're going to have, they seem almost unimaginable, but you'll have no problem with me, and I think when Christina and I and your mother have some time to work on him you'll have no problem with your father, John. But you do know, I'm sure you know, what you're up against. There'll be 100 million people right here in this country who will be shocked and offended and appalled and the two of you will just have to ride that out, maybe every day for the rest of your lives. You could try to ignore those people, or you could feel sorry for them and for their prejudice and their bigotry and their blind hatred and stupid fears, but where necessary you'll just have to cling tight to each other and say "screw all those people"! Anybody could make a case, a hell of a good case, against your getting married. The arguments are so obvious that nobody has to make them. But you're two wonderful people who happened to fall in love and happened to have a pigmentation problem, and I think that now, no matter what kind of a case some bastard could make against your getting married, there would be only one thing worse, and that would be if - knowing what you two are and knowing what you two have and knowing what you two feel- you didn't get married. Well, Tillie, when the hell are we gonna get some dinner?
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