7.2/10
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149 user 81 critic

Dance of the Vampires (1967)

Not Rated | | Comedy, Horror | 17 November 1967 (Italy)
A noted professor and his dim-witted apprentice fall prey to their inquiring vampires, while on the trail of the ominous damsel in distress.

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Writers:

(story and screenplay), (story and screenplay)
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1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
... Professor Abronsius
... Alfred
Alfie Bass ... Shagal, the Inn-Keeper
Jessie Robins ... Rebecca Shagal
... Sarah Shagal
... Count von Krolock / Narrator
... Herbert von Krolock
... Koukol, the Servant
... Magda, the Maid
... Village Idiot
... Sleigh Driver
Andreas Malandrinos ... Woodcutter
... Woodcutter
Matthew Walters ... Woodcutter
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
... Herbert (voice)
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Storyline

The elderly bat researcher, professor Abronsius and his assistant, Alfred, go to a remote Transylvanian village looking for vampires. Alfred falls in love with the inn-keeper's young daughter Sarah. However, she has been spotted by the mysterious count Krolock who lives in a dark and creepy castle outside the village... Written by Mattias Thuresson

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Who says Vampires are no laughing matter? See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Horror

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

17 November 1967 (Italy)  »

Also Known As:

The Fearless Vampire Killers or: Pardon Me, But Your Teeth Are in My Neck  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$2,000,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

,  »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound Recording)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The working title of this film was "Your Teeth in My Neck". See more »

Goofs

As Koukol places the lid onto Herbert's coffin, the edge of one of his "ugly hand" rubber gloves becomes visible. See more »

Quotes

Shagal, the Inn-Keeper: [a young woman tries to fend off Shagal, a Jewish Vampire, with a cross] Oy vey, have you got the wrong vampire.
See more »

Crazy Credits

In the opening credits the MGM-lion transforms into a vampire. See more »

Connections

Featured in 100 Years of Horror: Blood-Drinking Beings (1996) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
what Poland once was, with a smile (revealing fangs)
25 June 2006 | by See all my reviews

Well, what is this movie about? To begin with: although the vampire was best popularized in the modern era by English writers, it is really a myth of Eastern European Roman Catholicism. (I could explain that better - and why the English so well co-opted it - but obviously not here.) This type of Catholicism (which finally produced a Pope in John Paul II) now only thrives (and none too well) in Poland - Polanski's home country. During the Second World War, Poland was utterly decimated. First, a large portion of its wealthiest citizens, who happened to be Jewish, were exterminated. The Polish catholics themselves were split radically between anti-semitic nationalists (who also, mistakenly, thought the Nazis would save them from the Russians) and pro-Communists who, mistakenly, thought the Russians would save them from the Nazis. Obviously, this was a no-win situation for the Poles. And yet the first cinematic impression of this disaster arrived in the form of - a comedy - Ernst Lubitsch's "To Be Or Not To Be" (later remade by Mel Brooks).

Does the reader really need to know all this to appreciate this movie? actually, yes. This film is laughter at death's door. The funniest and most memorable line in the film is from the Jewish vampire, responding to a threatened crucifix: "Oy vey, have you got the wrong vampire!" Funny? - Hilarious. Unfortunately, if this Vampire had any grandchildren, they all died in Auschwitz.

Why am I playing such a heavy hand here? Because this really is a great horror-comedy, far better and far more important than the studio hacks at MGM who released this film (after chopping it up) could ever have understood.

There is unfortunately no rumor that there's a director's cut in the vaults; it is well to remember that Polanski nearly disowned this film on release, and really only reclaimed it after the brutal slaying of his wife, who plays such an important role in the film.

But even as shredded as it is (pay especially close attention to the discontinuities involving the Professor), this is still marvelously written, directed, and photographed - truly frightening at moments, utterly hilarious at others, but always grounded in a particularly Polish sensibility which is now, alas, a thing of the past; - the preservation of a culture that, at its best, was among the best in Europe.


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