7.6/10
24,469
124 user 55 critic

El Dorado (1966)

Passed | | Drama, Romance, Western | 30 June 1967 (USA)
Trailer
1:55 | Trailer
Cole Thornton, a gunfighter for hire, joins forces with an old friend, Sheriff J.P. Hara. Together with an old Indian fighter and a gambler, they help a rancher and his family fight a rival rancher that is trying to steal their water.

Director:

Howard Hawks

Writers:

Leigh Brackett (screenplay), Harry Brown (novel)
Reviews
Popularity
1,544 ( 415)
2 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
John Wayne ... Cole Thornton
Robert Mitchum ... El Dorado Sheriff J.P. Harrah
James Caan ... Mississippi
Charlene Holt ... Maudie
Paul Fix ... Dr. Miller
Arthur Hunnicutt ... Bull
Michele Carey ... Josephine (Joey) MacDonald
R.G. Armstrong ... Kevin MacDonald
Edward Asner ... Bart Jason
Christopher George ... Nelse McLeod
Marina Ghane ... Maria
Robert Donner ... Milt
John Gabriel ... Pedro
Johnny Crawford ... Luke MacDonald
Robert Rothwell ... Saul MacDonald
Edit

Storyline

Hired gunman Cole Thornton turns down a job with Bart Jason as it would mean having to fight an old sheriff friend. Some months later he finds out the lawman is on the bottle and a top gunfighter is heading his way to help Jason. Along with young Mississippi, handy with a knife and now armed with a diabolical shotgun, Cole returns to help. Written by Jeremy Perkins {J-26}

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

They were friends. They were enemies. A passerby could not tell which was who. This was the seething sultry Old Southwest. Where loyalties and labels shifted with the sands, the winking of an eye, the wavering of a gun! See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance | Western

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

According to James Caan, during a break he and John Wayne got into an altercation over a game of chess. Caan accused Wayne of cheating. Robert Mitchum intervened and cooled things down. See more »

Goofs

After Cole's been taken by McLeod's men and Maudie and Mississippi return to the jail to explain to JP and Bull what happened, the scene starts with Mississippi telling what happened. From there, Maudie begins talking. In the middle of her explanation, Mississippi mutters "From there on, Maudie's gonna have to tell you what happened after because..." He gestures to indicate he was unconscious. This seems like a needless thing to say given that he had already explained he was knocked out and she was already taking over the retelling. This is purely subjective, but it seems as though perhaps Charlene Holt may have jumped into her dialogue too soon before James Caan had finished since she jumps in at his pause. See more »

Quotes

Cole: What was the idea of diving under those horses?
Sheriff J. P. Harrah: Diving under those horses?
Mississippi: Yeah. A man can't shoot good when his horse is jumping, and a horse will not step on a man.
Sheriff J. P. Harrah: He won't?
Mississippi: He will?
Sheriff J. P. Harrah: Alan Bourdillion Ter-who?
Cole: Terhane.
Mississippi: Trahearne!
ColeSheriff J. P. Harrah: Trahearne.
Mississippi: Yeah.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Possibly due to their fame, the closing cast list does not bill John Wayne and Robert Mitchum. See more »

Connections

Edited into Histoire(s) du cinéma: Une histoire seule (1989) See more »

Soundtracks

I Dreamt I Dwelt in Marble Halls
(uncredited)
By Michael William Balfe
[From 'The Bohemian Girl'. Played on the saloon piano]
See more »

User Reviews

A pleasure through and through
3 April 1999 | by bwaynefSee all my reviews

The credits claim that Leigh Brackett's screenplay for 1967's "El Dorado" is based on a novel, "The Stars in Their Courses" by Harry Brown. The on-screen evidence indicates it was based on Brackett's own script for 1959's "Rio Bravo," in which John Wayne is a gunfighter joined by his buddy, a drunken sheriff, in guarding a town against a corrupt cattle baron. They are joined by a callow but dangerous youth, and a curmudgeonly deputy. In "Rio Bravo," these roles were admirably filled by Dean Martin, Ricky Nelson, and Walter Brennan. In "El Dorado," the Duke once again takes on the gunfighter role, but is joined this time by Robert Mitchum, James Caan, and Arthur Hunnicutt. Nothing wrong with that lineup, even though Caan can't sing like Ricky (Mitchum could probably do a fair imitation of ol' Dino, though). Like "Rio Bravo," this one is directed by Howard Hawks who liked to steal from his own movies. Several scenes in "El Dorado" are nearly exact duplicates of moments from "Rio Bravo" (Mitchum blasts holes into a piano when he suspects that the pianist's off-key playing denotes fear of the killer hidden behind it, whereas Martin found his prey in a saloon balcony after spotting blood dripping into a shot glass).

"El Dorado" is faster paced than the first film, but then it has a shorter running time. It's a pleasure through and through, but "Rio Bravo" is superior. In the latter film, you almost feel that you're holed up with the Duke, Dino, Ricky, and Walter, rather than just watching them.


35 of 50 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 124 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Spanish

Release Date:

30 June 1967 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

El Dorado See more »

Filming Locations:

Sonoran Desert, Arizona, USA See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$4,653,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed