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The Top Five Dave Grusin Movie Scores of His Career

David Grusin is a composer, producer, pianist, and arranger who is famous for writing the music scores for film and television. He was born on June 26, 1934, in Littleton, Colorado. He is best-known for writing music in the contemporary, jazz, and jazz fusion genres. He studied music at the University of Colorado. In 1962, he produced his first single, ‘Subways Are for Sleeping’. His first film score was for the movie ‘Divorce American Style’ in 1967. He has established a successful career as a composer and has written the music for many major films. Here are five of the

The Top Five Dave Grusin Movie Scores of His Career
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Shelley Berman, Stand-Up Comic and ‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’ Actor, Dies at 92

Shelley Berman, Stand-Up Comic and ‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’ Actor, Dies at 92
Famed stand-up comic Shelley Berman, who recently played Larry David’s father on “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” has died. He was 92.

Berman died early Friday morning due to complications from Alzheimer’s Disease at his home in Bell Canyon, Calif., his publicist confirmed to Variety.

The Grammy winner and Emmy-nominated actor was one of the most successful stand-up comedians of the 1950s and ’60s. His 1959 live record, “Inside Shelley Berman,” was the first comedy album to be certified gold (with more than 500,000 sales) and was the first non-musical recording to win a Grammy Award. Two other albums, “Outside Shelley Berman” and “The Edge of Shelley Berman,” also went gold.

Berman was the first stand-up comic to perform at Carnegie Hall. He appeared on “The Ed Sullivan Show” more than 20 times and was a guest on shows hosted by Steve Allen, Jack Paar, Dinah Shore, Perry Como, Andy Williams, and Dean Martin.

The
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Peter Tolan, Norman Lear Developing NBC Comedy With Production Commitment

Peter Tolan, Norman Lear Developing NBC Comedy With Production Commitment
Peter Tolan and Norman Lear are developing a new comedy series with NBC, Variety has learned.

The network has given the new single-camera series, currently titled “Guess Who Died,” a pilot production commitment. Based on Lear’s personal experience of working well into his 90’s, the series is described as a humorous and inspiring look at the shared joys and challenges people experience at any stage of life.

Lear and Tolan will serve as executive producers and writers, with Brent Miller also executive producing. Lear’s Act III Productions and Tolan’s Cloudland Company will produce along with Sony Pictures Television. Cloudland is set up under an overall deal at Sony.

Lear is a television legend, having created, produced, and written classic shows such as “Good Times,” “Maude,” “The Jeffersons,” “All in the Family,” and “One Day at a Time.” He has been nominated for 11 Emmy Awards during his storied career, winning
See full article at Variety - TV News »

A Tribute to Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds

2016 claimed a long list of entertainers, but the grim reaper’s most unexpected one-two punch came between the final two holidays with the death of movie icons Carrie Fisher on December 12 and her mother Debbie Reynolds a mere 36 hours later. With the premiere of the documentary about the pair, “Bright Lights” on HBO this weekend, we at the Geeks site thought we should take a look at their considerable contributions to film.

Let’s start with Carrie, who was born in Hollywood, USA on October 21, 1956, the daughter of Debbie and singer/actor Eddie Fisher. She appeared on stage with her mother throughout the late 60’s and early 70’s, even getting her first small screen credit in the 1969 TV movie “Debbie Reynolds and the Sound of Children”. It wasn’t until 1975, when she would make her big screen debut opposite Warren Beatty (quite an arrival) in Hal Ashby’s hit Shampoo.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

In memoriam: the film stars and directors we lost in 2016

In memoriam: the film stars and directors we lost in 2016
We pay tribute to the film stars and directors from around the world who sadly passed away in 2016.Hector BabencoArgentine-born Brazilian director Hector Babenco died on July 13 at 70-years-old.He found international success with Brazilian slum drama Pixote (1981), going on to make Kiss Of

We pay tribute to the film stars and directors from around the world who sadly passed away in 2016.

Hector Babenco

Argentine-born Brazilian director Hector Babenco died on July 13 at 70-years-old.

He found international success with Brazilian slum drama Pixote (1981), going on to make Kiss Of The Spider Woman (1985), for which he earned a best director Oscar nominee and William Hurt earned an Oscar win for best actor.

Babenco went on to direct Meryl Streep and Jack Nicholson in Ironweed (1987) and Tom Berenger and John Lithgow in At Play In The Fields Of The Lord (1991).

After undergoing cancer treatment in the 1990s, he returned to the director’s chair for films including Brazilian prison
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Debbie Reynolds, Hollywood Icon and Mom to Carrie Fisher, Passes Away at 84

Debbie Reynolds, Hollywood Icon and Mom to Carrie Fisher, Passes Away at 84
As we slowly creep towards the New Year, yet another icon has been taken away. Less than twenty-four hours after the death of Star Wars legend Carrie Fisher, it was reported that her mother, actress and Hollywood icon Debbie Reynolds, passed away at the age of 84. Some believe the singer and actress died of a broken heart.

Debbie Reynolds is perhaps best known for her starring role in the musical classics Singin' in the Rain and The Unsinkable Molly Brown. She succumbed to a stroke on Wednesday night. The actress and singer had been rushed to the hospital earlier in the day complaining of breathing problems. Son Todd Fisher told Variety that Debbie 'wanted to be with Carrie.' An exact cause of death was not announced at this time.

Debbie Reynolds became a major star of the silver screen in the 1950s and 1960s. She gained notoriety in the
See full article at MovieWeb »

Debbie Reynolds dies day after her daughter Carrie Fisher

  • ScreenDaily
Debbie Reynolds dies day after her daughter Carrie Fisher
The Oscar-nominated star of such iconic films as Singin’ In The Rain and The Unsinkable Molly Brown has died in Los Angeles, one day after the death of her daughter Carrie Fisher. She was 84.

Reynolds, an enduring and vivacious presence in Hollywood who made her name in MGM musicals and comedies in the 1950s and 1960s, was taken to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles on Wednesday after reportedly suffering a stroke. She died later in the day.

Her passing so soon after her daughter’s death on Tuesday following a heart attack on a plane is the latest devastating blow to their family.

Reynolds’ son Todd Fisher confirmed the news to AP, as he had kept the press apprised of his late sister’s progress in hospital several days ago.

“She’s now with Carrie and we’re all heartbroken,” Fisher said, adding that Fisher’s death had taken its toll on his mother. He told reporters
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Us star Debbie Reynolds dies at 84

  • ScreenDaily
Us star Debbie Reynolds dies at 84
The Oscar-nominated star of such iconic films as Singin’ In The Rain and The Unsinkable Molly Brown has died in Los Angeles, one day after the death of her daughter Carrie Fisher.

Reynolds, an enduring and vivacious presence in Hollywood who made her name in MGM musicals and comedies in the 1950s and 1960s, was taken to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles on Wednesday after reportedly suffering a stroke. Shed died later in the day.

Her passing so soon after her daughter’s death on Tuesday following a heart attack on a plane is the latest devastating blow to their family.

Reynolds’ son Todd Fisher confirmed the news to AP, as he had kept the press apprised of his late sister’s progress in hospital several days ago.

“She’s now with Carrie and we’re all heartbroken,” Fisher said, adding that Fisher’s death took its toll on his mother.

Reynolds was born
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Doris Roberts, Star of ‘Everybody Loves Raymond,’ Dies at 90

Doris Roberts, Star of ‘Everybody Loves Raymond,’ Dies at 90
Doris Roberts, a character actress who labored honorably both on stage and screen for years before finding the perfect vehicle for her talents, the hit sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond,” died on Sunday. She was 90.

Her “Everybody Loves Raymond” co-star Patricia Heaton confirmed the news on Twitter.

A cause of death has not yet been released. According to TMZ, which first reported the news, Roberts died in Los Angeles. ABC and CBS also confirmed the news.

Roberts was nominated for 11 Emmys, including seven for playing Marie Barone on “Raymond,” winning four for her work on that series; she picked up her first Emmy in 1983 for a guest appearance on “St. Elsewhere,” making for a total of five wins overall.

On “Everybody Loves Raymond,” Roberts’ almost omnipresent Marie Barone (she appeared on every episode of the show, which ran from 1996-2005) made life difficult for her son, Ray Romano’s Ray, and especially for his wife Debra,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Doris Roberts, Star of ‘Everybody Loves Raymond,’ Dies at 90

Doris Roberts, Star of ‘Everybody Loves Raymond,’ Dies at 90
Doris Roberts, a character actress who labored honorably both on stage and screen for years before finding the perfect vehicle for her talents, the hit sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond,” died on Sunday. She was 90.

Her “Everybody Loves Raymond” co-star Patricia Heaton confirmed the news on Twitter.

A cause of death has not yet been released. According to TMZ, which first reported the news, Roberts died in Los Angeles. ABC and CBS also confirmed the news.

Roberts was nominated for 11 Emmys, including seven for playing Marie Barone on “Raymond,” winning four for her work on that series; she picked up her first Emmy in 1983 for a guest appearance on “St. Elsewhere,” making for a total of five wins overall.

On “Everybody Loves Raymond,” Roberts’ almost omnipresent Marie Barone (she appeared on every episode of the show, which ran from 1996-2005) made life difficult for her son, Ray Romano’s Ray, and especially for his wife Debra,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Sundance Film Review: ‘Norman Lear: Just Another Version of You’

Sundance Film Review: ‘Norman Lear: Just Another Version of You’
With politics of representation in the U.S. entertainment industry currently under intense scrutiny, “Norman Lear: Just Another Version of You” doesn’t feel quite like the comforting nostalgia trip one might expect. Instead, Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady’s sprightly, brightly assembled celebration of the veteran showrunner holds up a mirror to contemporary American television, tacitly asking if it’s addressing issues of difference and prejudice as directly (and daringly) as Lear’s shows, including such 1970s staples as “All in the Family” and “The Jeffersons,” did. Generally laudatory in its approach to its irresistible human subject — if Lear’s signature white hat remains immovably on his head, the film’s stays very much in hand — this appreciation is nonetheless most fascinating in a brief stretch where the political correctness of Lear’s work is called into question by black performers. Brassily entertaining as it is, “Just Another Version
See full article at Variety - Film News »

More Than 'Star Wars' Actress Mom: Reynolds Shines Even in Mawkish 'Nun' Based on Tragic Real-Life (Ex-)Nun

Debbie Reynolds ca. early 1950s. Debbie Reynolds movies: Oscar nominee for 'The Unsinkable Molly Brown,' sweetness and light in phony 'The Singing Nun' Debbie Reynolds is Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” star today, Aug. 23, '15. An MGM contract player from 1950 to 1959, Reynolds' movies can be seen just about every week on TCM. The only premiere on Debbie Reynolds Day is Jerry Paris' lively marital comedy How Sweet It Is (1968), costarring James Garner. This evening, TCM is showing Divorce American Style, The Catered Affair, The Unsinkable Molly Brown, and The Singing Nun. 'Divorce American Style,' 'The Catered Affair' Directed by the recently deceased Bud Yorkin, Divorce American Style (1967) is notable for its cast – Reynolds, Dick Van Dyke, Jean Simmons, Jason Robards, Van Johnson, Lee Grant – and for the fact that it earned Norman Lear (screenplay) and Robert Kaufman (story) a Best Original Screenplay Academy Award nomination.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Bud Yorkin, ‘Jeffersons’ and ‘All in the Family’ Director-Producer, Dies at 89

Bud Yorkin, ‘Jeffersons’ and ‘All in the Family’ Director-Producer, Dies at 89
Bud Yorkin, director of influential 1970s TV shows including “All In The Family,” “Maude,” “The Jeffersons,” “Sanford and Sons” and “Diff’rent Strokes,” died Aug. 18 of natural causes at his home in the Bel Air neighborhood of Los Angeles. He was 89.

Yorkin played a pivotal role in developing some of the most popular series of the 1970s in partnership with Norman Lear at Tandem Productions. He was nominated for three Emmys and worked on TV series that won 25 Emmys and 10 Golden Globes. His feature film directing credits included “Love Hurts,” “Twice In A Lifetime,” “Arthur 2: On The Rocks,” “The Thief Who Came To Dinner” and “Inspector Clouseau.”

After working in the 1950s on numerous award-winning variety shows, he teamed with writer Lear in 1959 to form Tandem Productions, and made his film directing debut with “Come Blow Your Horn” starring Frank Sinatra. Yorkin had previously worked with Lear on such
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Bud Yorkin, ‘Jeffersons’ and ‘All in the Family’ Director-Producer, Dies at 89

Bud Yorkin, director of influential 1970s TV shows including “All In The Family,” “Maude,” “The Jeffersons,” “Sanford and Sons” and “Diff’rent Strokes,” died Aug. 18 of natural causes at his home in the Bel Air neighborhood of Los Angeles. He was 89.

Yorkin played a pivotal role in developing some of the most popular series of the 1970s in partnership with Norman Lear at Tandem Productions. He was nominated for three Emmys and worked on TV series that won 25 Emmys and 10 Golden Globes. His feature film directing credits included “Love Hurts,” “Twice In A Lifetime,” “Arthur 2: On The Rocks,” “The Thief Who Came To Dinner” and “Inspector Clouseau.”

After working in the 1950s on numerous award-winning variety shows, he teamed with writer Lear in 1959 to form Tandem Productions, and made his film directing debut with “Come Blow Your Horn” starring Frank Sinatra. Yorkin had previously worked with Lear on such
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Bud Yorkin dies aged 89

  • ScreenDaily
Bud Yorkin dies aged 89
The film and television director, producer and writer died of natural causes at his Bel Air Home. He was 89.

Yorkin was born in the coal mining town of Washington, Pennsylvania on February 22 1926 and after serving in the Navy embarked on a career as a camera engineer for NBC.

He became a stage manager and then writer, working on NBC’s variety showcase The Colgate Comedy Hour. He moved into directing that show and then directed stints on programmes such as The Spike Jones Show and Light’s Diamond Jubilee.

Film director credits include Love Hurts, Twice In A Lifetime, Arthur 2: On The Rocks, The Thief Who Came To Dinner, Start The Revolution Without Me, Inspector Clouseau, Divorce American Style and Come Blow Your Horn.

He also served as executive producer on Blade Runner and played a role as producer in bringing to fruition the sequel, which is set to begin shooting next summer.

His credits
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Slugfest: Bruce McClure at the International Film Festival Rotterdam

  • MUBI
One half of enjoying a marvel is wondering how it works, and the other half is not knowing. Bruce McClure’s cinema is a spectacle to savor, for once his built-up gallows are packed away and taken home, there can be no encore. While film projectionists have long been an endangered species, the Brooklyn-based licensed architect assumes the mantle of sole creator, hunched over one or two or three 16mm or Super-8 projectors, twiddling away behind a torchlight on a handmade soundboard, with which he has as much fun as he does the guitar pedals at his feet.

This is autonomy incarnate: projector, performer, meaning-maker and destroyer. “Have we got time?” He asks during one of his nine live shows at this year’s International Film Festival Rotterdam. “I mean I know we have time but I could go on with this all night.”

McClure is difficult to pin down in a number of ways.
See full article at MUBI »

Norman Lear to be Honored by Writers Guild Awards

  • The Wrap
Norman Lear to be Honored by Writers Guild Awards
Veteran television writer and producer Norman Lear will receive the Evelyn F. Burkey Award at the 67th annual Writers Guild Awards in New York City on Feb. 14.

The award recognizes a person or organization whose contributions have brought honor and dignity to writers.

“Over several decades, the Writers Guild, East has presented the Burkey Award to celebrate the achievements of leaders – in the arts or politics – who have advanced the causes of creativity and freedom of speech,” said Writers Guild of America, East president Michael Winship. “This year, by honoring Norman Lear, we choose a man who spans the worlds
See full article at The Wrap »

Norman Lear Selected for Writers Guild’s Evelyn Burkey Award

The Writers Guild of America East has selected Norman Lear as the recipient of its Evelyn F. Burkey Award, which recognizes those who have brought “honor and dignity” to writers.

The trophy will be presented by Bill Moyers at the 67th annual Writers Guild Awards in New York City on Feb. 14 at the Edison Ballroom.

Lear has been a WGA member since 1951. He began his career writing sketches for Jack Haley, Martin and Lewis, and Martha Raye, and created his first television series, “The Deputy,” a Western starring Henry Fonda, in 1959.

Lear’s iconic “All in the Family” debuted in 1971 and won four Emmy Awards for best comedy series, received a Peabody Award and was nominated for 11 WGA awards. Lear followed “All in the Family” with “Maude,” “The Jeffersons,” “Sanford and Son,” “Good Times,” “One Day at a Time” and “Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman.”

He was nominated for an Oscar
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Debbie Reynolds To Be Honored With 2014 SAG Life Achievement Award

Photo courtesy Debbie Reynolds Studios

Debbie Reynolds – actor, singer, dancer, author, champion for the preservation of the artifacts of film history and for the understanding and treatment of mental illness – has been named the 51st recipient of SAG-AFTRA’s highest honor: the SAG Life Achievement Award for career achievement and humanitarian accomplishment.

Given annually to an actor who fosters the “finest ideals of the acting profession,” the union’s highest accolade will be presented to the Oscar, Emmy and Tony-nominated Reynolds at the 21st Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards, which will be simulcast live on TNT and TBS on Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015 at 8 p.m. (Et), 7 p.m. (Ct), 6 p.m. (Mt) and 5 p.m. (Pt).

SAG-AFTRA President Ken Howard praised Reynolds’ artistry over her very accomplished career, saying, “I’m thrilled that SAG-AFTRA is presenting our Life Achievement Award to Debbie Reynolds. She is a tremendously talented
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Debbie Reynolds Selected for SAG Life Achievement Award

Debbie Reynolds Selected for SAG Life Achievement Award
Debbie Reynolds has been named the 51st recipient of the SAG Life Achievement Award for her career and humanitarian accomplishments.

The award will be presented at the 21st Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards on Jan. 25.

Reynolds has starred in more than 50 movies, two Broadway shows, two TV series and dozens of TV, cabaret and concert appearances. The 82-year-old Reynolds has been in show business for 66 years.

Her first movie role came in the 1950 musical “the Daughter of Rosie O’Grady” followed by a role as “Boop-Boop-a-Doop” girl Helen Kane in “Three Little Words,” for which she received an MGM contract and the first of five Golden Globe nominations.

She appeared in “Singin’ in the Rain” opposite Gene Kelly and Donald O’Connor; “The Unsinkable Molly Brown,” for which she was nominated for an Oscar; “How the West Was Won,” “The Tender Trap,” “Mary, Mary,” “Goodbye Charlie,” “Divorce American Style,” “How Sweet It Is,
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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