The Red and the White (1967) - News Poster

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Movie Poster of the Week: Now Showing on Mubi

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Above: Soviet poster for The Ghost That Never Returns (Abram Room, Soviet Union, 1929). Designed by the Sternberg Brothers.Have you seen what’s playing on Mubi lately? Many of you who read my column may not often partake of the best of what Mubi has to offer, which is a beautifully curated, constantly changing selection of films which amounts to a top-notch repertory cinema on your laptop and in your living room. Now that Mubi is on the Roku app too there is even more reason to subscribe to the best film streaming deal on the internet. I know, I know, there is always too much to see and too little time, but for me what elevates Mubi over other streaming services—and I’m not just saying this because I write for them—is the 30-day model which offers you a new surprise every morning as well as the
See full article at MUBI »

New to Streaming: ‘The Handmaiden,’ ‘Loving,’ ‘The Light Between Oceans,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

American Pastoral (Ewan McGregor)

If my limited experience with Philip Roth adaptations is any indication, his novels deal in emotion. There are existential crises concerning identity involved, each a character study about life’s impact beyond the surface experiences propelling them forward. This isn’t something easily translated from page to screen when so much consists of internalized motivation. You must really look into the text, ignoring plot to
See full article at The Film Stage »

Video Essay. Relay: A Take in Miklós Jancsó’s "The Red and the White"

  • MUBI
The nineteenth entry in an on-going series of audiovisual essays by Cristina Álvarez López and Adrian Martin. Mubi will be showing Miklós Jancsó's The Red and the White (1967) from January 21 - February 20, 2017 in the United States.The long take—long in duration, rather than in the distance between the camera and the action—is contemporary art cinema’s greatest fetish. We commonly associate it with a static camera and empty, dead time—each moment grinding away as life evaporates—or with the steady, deliberately un-aesthetic, often lateral movements of camera and figures. However, in an earlier era, the era of Miklós Jancsó in 1960s Hungary and Theo Angelopoulos in 1970s Greece, the long take was a more supple tool, exploited for many uses, moods and effects. There is a lot happening in any, typical long take of Jancsó’s historical, political drama of the 1919 struggle between Hungarian Communists and Russian Cossacks,
See full article at MUBI »

Miklós Jancsó and the Wages of War: Close-Up on "The Red and the White"

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Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Miklós Jancsó's The Red and the White (1967) will be showing January 21 - February 20, 2017 in the United States.The opening shot of The Red and the White shows armed riders on horseback rushing gallantly toward the camera in slow motion. It is the type of heroic imagery one associates with a valiant depiction of soldiers heading off to battle, to fight the good fight for a lofty cause. But in this outstanding 1967 film from Miklós Jancsó, one of the great anti-war testaments, such iconic and potentially promotional action is never to be seen again. In its place are the callous and violent vagaries of cold barbarity, overzealously arbitrary authority, and the unremitting movement of people, sometimes strategically, sometimes on an apparently random whim. Made during a politically pivotal and formally transitory period in Jancsó’s career, The Red and the White
See full article at MUBI »

Close-Up on "Hard to Be a God" and the Medieval in European Cinema

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Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Hard to Be a God is playing on Mubi in the Us through January 2.Hard to Be a GodRussian director Aleksei German spent the final 15 years of his life working on Hard To Be A God (2013), a brutal medieval epic adapted from a 1964 novel of the same name by Arkady and Boris Strutgatsky, dying just before he could complete the job in February 2013. Happily, his son and widow were able to oversee the final sound mix. The result is one of the most immersive and harrowing cinematic experiences going, three hours of being put to the sword and mired in the mud, blood and viscera of a nightmare alternate reality.Although German's characters are dressed in the clanking armour, chainmail and robes of the European Middle Ages, Hard To Be A God is in fact set on a distant planet,
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Movie Poster of the Week: Peter Strausfeld’s Posters for the Early Films of Miklós Jancsó

  • MUBI
When the great Hungarian filmmaker Miklós Jancsó died on January 31 of this year at the age of 92, the news rippled somberly around the cinephile world but didn’t make much of a splash. Jancsó was undoubtedly one of the titans of modern cinema, but he was also something of a forgotten man. He made some 30 feature films over 52 years and was working almost until the end. His final feature, So Much for Justice!, was made just four years ago and yet, like most of his recent work, it was probably never shown in the U.S.. (You can see a fascinating, though unsubtitled, piece on the making of it here and it looks like classic Jancsó, tracking shots and all.)

Though he made some terrific films in the 80s, like the evocatively titled Season of Monsters and Jesus Christ’s Horoscope, it was the 1960s and 70s which were Jancsó’s heyday,
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Miklós Jancsó obituary

Film director who used powerful symbolism to depict the fight for Hungarian socialism and independence

At the 1966 Cannes film festival, a movie whose title sounded like a western – but was actually Hungarian – caused a sensation and launched its director into the international cinematic scene, where he was to remain for a decade. The film of hypnotic beauty and daring technique was The Round-Up (Szegénylegények, literally translated as The Outlaws) and the director was Miklós Jancsó, who has died aged 92.

Jancsó's highly personal style had blossomed in this, his fifth feature. The Round-Up is set on a bleak Hungarian plain in 1868, when Austro‑Hungarian troops tried to break the unity of the Hungarian partisans by torture, interrogations and killings. There is little dialogue as horsemen drive the people to and fro, with power continually changing hands. Jancsó's ritualistic style manages to make the particular Hungarian situation into a universal parable of evil,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Cannes-winner and long take master Miklos Jancso dies at 92

Cannes-winner and long take master Miklos Jancso dies at 92
Hungarian filmmaker Miklós Jancsó, winner of the best director award at the 1972 Cannes Film Festival, died Friday. He was 92.

Jancsó’s death after a long illness was announced by the Association of Hungarian Film Artists.

Known for his long takes and for depicting the passage of time in his historical epics merely by changes of costume, Jancsó won his Cannes award for Red Psalm, about a 19th-century peasant revolt.

In the 1960s, critics ranked Jancso alongside great directors such as Michelangelo Antonioni and Ingmar Bergman. However, it was his use of scantily clad women, symbolizing defencelessness, which drew big audiences in prudish communist Hungary.
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Miklos Jancso, Hungarian Filmmaker Who Won at Cannes, Dies at 92

Miklos Jancso, Hungarian Filmmaker Who Won at Cannes, Dies at 92
Hungarian filmmaker Miklos Jancso, winner of the best director award at the 1972 Cannes Film Festival, died Friday after a long illness. He was 92.

Known for his long takes and for depicting the passage of time in his historical epics merely by changes of costume, Jancso won his Cannes award for “Red Psalm,” about a 19th-century peasant revolt.

In the 1960s, critics ranked Jancso alongside great directors such as Michelangelo Antonioni and Ingmar Bergman. However, it was his use of scantily clad women, symbolizing defenselessness, which drew big audiences in prudish Communist Hungary.

Jancso was born in Vac, a small town north of Budapest. His parents were refugees from Transylvania, once a part of Hungary.

“My mother was Romanian. In civilian life, the family members were friends, but politically on opposite sides … For me this was a great lesson, that conflict, much less violence, will never solve the nationality problems,” Jancso said.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Miklós Jancsó dies at 92

Hungarian director Miklós Jancsó Hungarian film director Miklós Jancsó has died at the age of 92 after a long illness.

Jancsó's films included My Way Home (Így jöttem, 1964), The Round-Up (Szegénylegények, 1965), The Red And The White (Csillagosok, katonák, 1967), Silence and Cry (Csend és kiáltás, 1968) The Confrontation (Fényes szelek, 1968) and Red Psalm (Még kér a nép, 1971) - for which was awarded the Best Director prize at Cannes in 1972. He was at the forefront of the revival of Hungarian cinema and was known the starkness of his themes and a distinctive visual style that influenced filmmakers as diverse as Sergio Leone and Béla Tarr.

He received lifetime achievement awards in Cannes in 1979, Venice in 1990 and Budapest in 1994.

Fellow Hungarian director István Szabó said: “Jancsó occupies a unique place in Hungarian culture. If he hadn't made such films as The Round-Up, My Way Home,...
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Béla Tarr retires … very, very slowly

Master of the long take bows out to found a film school. Here's hoping it turns out graduates as singular as him

Call me a size-queen if you like, but I'm horribly partial to movies that pour on the long takes and frog-march the viewer without a cut through enormous oceanic expanses of screen-time. Pulling off movies entirely composed of shots lasting 10 or more minutes is a difficult undertaking, but when directors succeed, it's so satisfying that one almost mourns the impending arrival of a cut.

So I'm disappointed that Béla Tarr, today's supreme master of the serpentine take, as exemplified by his latest movie, The Turin Horse, has decided to retire from making movies in order to found his own film school in Split, Croatia. My fondest hope is that he will create a fanatical, cult-like environment wherein he can hothouse a generation of film-makers as grouchy, misanthropic and visionary as himself,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Béla Tarr’s The Turin Horse: The Limits of a Signature Style

Béla Tarr’s The Turin Horse: The Limits of a Signature Style
Still from The Turin Horse

Among the various elements of camera style, the long uncut sequence has a way of getting attention for itself. Originally, the device was a constituent of mise en scène or the articulation of cinematic space (as opposed to montage, which is the articulation of time). Where mise en scène has regard for the subject in front of the camera and is associated with the realist aesthetic, montage enables expression by making new associations. The uncut sequence in films by Max Ophuls (e.g. The Earrings of Madame de…, 1954) is a way of maintaining the integrity of the space while narrating and this is also true of Miklós Jancsó (The Red and the White, 1967). In Ophuls’ dance hall scenes, for instance, the camera catches different elements of the action without a single cut, thereby establishing the unity of space instead of dismembering it – as Sergei Eisenstein
See full article at DearCinema.com »

Cannes 2011. Gerardo Naranjo's "Miss Bala"

Updated through 5/17.

To follow up on yesterday's "Snapshot" from Marie-Pierre Duhamel, a roundup of what, in this case, we might as well refer to as The Raves of Others.

"Inspired by the true story of a Tijuana beauty queen who got mixed up with the local narco gangsters, Gerardo Naranjo's Miss Bala is a ferociously paced crime thriller, filled with atmospheric detail and exceedingly bleak humor," blogs the Voice's J Hoberman. "Here, even more than with his Godard homage youth film I'm Gonna Explode (the great discovery of the 2008 New York Film Festival), Naranjo demonstrates an impressively fluid camera, a feel for location, and a terrific rapport with actors. Stephanie Sigman, the natural beauty who innocently stumbles through the looking glass to find herself catapulted into a series of increasingly violent gangster transactions, as well as the televised Miss Bala pageant, exhibits tremendous poise in her first major role
See full article at MUBI »

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