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Chelsea Girls (1966)

Lacking a formal narrative, Warhol's art house classic follows various residents of the Chelsea Hotel in 1966 New York City, presented in a split screen with a single audio track in conjunction with one side of screen.
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1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Brigid Berlin ... Self - The Duchess (as Brigid Polk)
Randy Borscheidt Randy Borscheidt ... Self
Christian Päffgen Christian Päffgen ... Self (as Ari)
Angelina 'Pepper' Davis Angelina 'Pepper' Davis ... Self
Dorothy Dean Dorothy Dean ... Self
Eric Emerson Eric Emerson ... Self
Patrick Flemming Patrick Flemming ... Self
Ed Hood Ed Hood ... Self
Arthur Loeb Arthur Loeb ... Self
Donald Lyons Donald Lyons ... Self
Gerard Malanga Gerard Malanga ... Son
Marie Menken Marie Menken ... Mother
Mario Montez Mario Montez ... Transvestite
Nico ... Self
Ondine Ondine ... Self - Pope
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Storyline

Lacking a formal narrative, Warhol's art house classic follows various residents of the Chelsea Hotel in 1966 New York City, presented in a split screen with a single audio track in conjunction with one side of screen.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Made history by becoming the first "underground" film to be shown in a mainstream cinema. In a limited run at New York's Cinema Rendezvous from December 1st 1966. See more »

Quotes

Ingrid Superstar: Who wants to be an angel?
See more »

Alternate Versions

Two segments listed in the original program for The Chelsea Girls were deleted from the film: 'The Afternoon' and 'The Closet'. 'The Afternoon' starred Edie Sedgwick who, according to Paul Morrissey, asked for her footage to be taken out of the movie because she had signed a contract with Bob Dylan's manager, Albert Grossman. 'The Closet' starring Nico and Randy Borscheidt is now a separate film. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Midnight Movies: From the Margin to the Mainstream (2005) See more »

User Reviews

"Everything is pretty."
17 February 1999 | by matt-201See all my reviews

Maddening but exquisite--one of the most beautiful of all American movies. The genius of Warhol as filmmaker was his stubborn insistence--conscious or otherwise--on bringing the principles of portraiture in painting to movies. Warhol understood that the power of the portrait is as psychological as it is technical, and his strategies for eliciting "acting" were as excruciating as they are potent. In his filmed "still lifes" of Edie Sedgwick and Henry Geldzahler he seemed to extract a spiritual radiance through duration and discomfort as if from a syringe, and in "Chelsea Girls" the concentrated sadism of his directing style produces similarly unpredictable, human, extravagant results. Shown with two projectors (one randomly producing sound, the other silent), the film shows three and a half hours of faces--superstars and hangers-on hung out to dry in front of an impassive and directionless camera that, after the maestro's fashion, silently encourages the "performers" to entertain. Some twist in the wind, others outdo all expectations; something palpably human, essential, unprojected is born of all of them. The film is hard going when seen in a theatre, but by the time Warhol gets to the transcendent, almost wordless rhapsody of the final garishly colored reels, the trek pays off like a sunburst.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Portuguese

Release Date:

November 1968 (Denmark) See more »

Also Known As:

Chelsea-lányok See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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