7.0/10
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90 user 26 critic

Bedazzled (1967)

Approved | | Comedy, Fantasy, Romance | 10 December 1967 (USA)
A hapless loser sells his soul to the Devil in exchange for seven wishes, but has trouble winning over the girl of his dreams.

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(screenplay), (story) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
... George Spiggott
... Stanley Moon
... Margaret
... Lilian Lust
Alba ... Vanity
... Anger
... Envy
Parnell McGarry ... Gluttony
Danièle Noël ... Avarice (as Daniele Noel)
Howard Goorney ... Sloth
... Inspector Clarke
Bernard Spear ... Irving Moses
... Randolph
... Lord Dowdy
Evelyn Moore ... Mrs. Wisby
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Storyline

Stanley is a short order cook, infatuated with Margaret, the statuesque waitress who works at Wimpy Bar with him. Despondent, he prepares to end it all when he meets George Spiggott AKA the Devil. Selling his soul for 7 wishes, Stanley tries to make Margaret his own first as an intellectual, then as a rock star, then as a wealthy industrialist. As each fails, he becomes more aware of how empty his life had been and how much more he has to live for. He also meets the seven deadly sins who try and advise him. Written by John Vogel <jlvogel@comcast.net>

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Wait till you see Dudley Moore as 'The Nun' [USA] See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

10 December 1967 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Stanley Donen's Bedazzled  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$600,000 (estimated)
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Technical Specs

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(Deluxe)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Dudley Moore adopted the moniker Stanley Moon in this film after John Gielgud wrote him a letter of introduction because he was impressed with Moore's work in the stage revue "Beyond the Fringe". Gielgud obliviously referred to Moore as Stanley Moon in the letter, and an amused Moore adopted the name as an alter ego for the rest of his life. After they worked on Arthur (1981) and Arthur 2: On the Rocks (1988) together, Gielgud good-naturedly said that he "got to know Stanley Moon rather well." See more »

Goofs

(at around 55 mins) During Dudley Moore's song "Love Me" which he sings in character as Stanley Moon, the woman to the right of the screen seems to say repeatedly "Oh Dudley" instead of calling him by his character's name, "Stanley". See more »

Quotes

Stanley Moon: Well, I suppose Lust and Gluttony really have to be rather near the bathroom.
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Crazy Credits

The film ends with God laughing at the devil; God's laughter continues intermittently throughout the closing credits. See more »


Soundtracks

G.P.O. Tower
Composed by Dudley Moore
Performed by Dudley Moore Trio
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User Reviews

It really is that good
17 April 2002 | by See all my reviews

Just watched it again and this time I get it. Thirty-four years ago the script was over my head and I missed most of the double entendres. 1967 was a great

year for them as censorship had just been slackened. The pop star sequence is in fuzzy black and white because it's supposed to be on TV - yes, that's what it used to look like. (Did people really dance like that?)

The script is brilliant but sometimes the delivery is so throw-away the jokes are missed. Maybe as Peter Cook wrote them he didn't think they needed

underlining. For example, when Stanley borrows George's red nightshirt and

says something like "Does it really suit me? Red's not my colour, I'm usually more conservative." Red for socialism, blue for the conservative party. George's red socks were sported by Labour voters well into the conservative 70s and

80s.

Little things you may not know: Victorian nightshirts and long-legged bathing suits were a fad in 1967. George and Stanley when being themselves speak in

working class accents (unlike God). Dudley really was working class, unlike

Peter Cook.

RIP to both. Let's eat a bowl of raspberries and cream in their memories. xxxxxxxxxxx


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