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The Forsyte Saga 

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The extended Forsyte family live a more than pleasant upper middle class life in Victorian and later Edwardian England. The two central characters are Soames Forsyte and his cousin Jolyon ... See full summary »
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1  
1970   1969  
Won 1 Primetime Emmy. Another 3 wins & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Series cast summary:
Eric Porter ...  Soames Forsyte 26 episodes, 1967
Margaret Tyzack ...  Winifred Dartie 23 episodes, 1967
Nyree Dawn Porter ...  Irene Forsyte née Heron 19 episodes, 1967
Kenneth More ...  'Young Jolyon' Forsyte 16 episodes, 1967
June Barry June Barry ...  June Forsyte 16 episodes, 1967
Susan Hampshire ...  Fleur Mont née Forsyte 14 episodes, 1967
Nicholas Pennell Nicholas Pennell ...  Michael Mont 14 episodes, 1967
Maggie Jones Maggie Jones ...  Smither 14 episodes, 1967
John Welsh ...  James Forsyte 13 episodes, 1967
John Barcroft John Barcroft ...  George Forsyte 12 episodes, 1967
Fanny Rowe Fanny Rowe ...  Emily Forsyte 11 episodes, 1967
Nora Nicholson ...  Aunt Juley Forsyte 11 episodes, 1967
Suzanne Neve ...  Holly Dartie née Forsyte 11 episodes, 1967
Julia White Julia White ...  Coaker 11 episodes, 1967
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Storyline

The extended Forsyte family live a more than pleasant upper middle class life in Victorian and later Edwardian England. The two central characters are Soames Forsyte and his cousin Jolyon Forsyte. Soames is a solicitor, all proper and straight-laced. His love for the beautiful Irene is his only weakness as is his beautiful daughter Fleur. Young Jolyon is the opposite, a free-thinking artist who abandons his wife to live with his children's nanny. Their lives and their children's lives will intersect over 30 years bringing happiness to some and tragedy to others. Written by garykmcd

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Genres:

Drama | Romance

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Donald Wilson gave up his position as Head of BBC Serials in 1965 so that he could concentrate all his efforts on making this serial. See more »

Quotes

[the family are discussing the Boers]
Soames Forsyte: They signed a contract, they must stick to it. I know there's something to be said for their point of view, but a contract is a contract.
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Connections

Version of The Forsyte Saga (2002) See more »

Soundtracks

Halcyon Days
(uncredited)
(from the suite 'The Three Elizabeths')
By Eric Coates
(theme music)
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User Reviews

Well worth the 36 years' wait
13 March 2003 | by behrens-4See all my reviews

In the early years of the last century, John Galsworthy wrote nine novels, divided into three trilogies. "The Man of Property," "In Chancery" and "To Let" formed the first trilogy, which he called "The Forsyte Saga." The second group, "The White Monkey," "The Silver Swan" and "Swan Song" formed "A Modern Comedy." Finally "Maid in Waiting," "Flowering Wilderness" and "One More River" made up the last group called "End of the Chapter."



The first three books concentrated on the property-driven first generation Forsyte men, whose world was broken up by a beautiful woman called Irene, "a concretion of disturbing Beauty impinging on a possessive world," as Galsworthy puts it in his preface. But it is also a saga that brings us from the Victorian world in the 1880s up to the 1920s when the new generation finds new values.

Now this is very difficult stuff to reduce to a miniseries, but that is what BBC did quite successfully back in the 1960s and the television audience on both sides of the Atlantic went wild. For half a year, given a 50-minute episode each week for 26 weeks, they sat fascinated as they watched the fortunes of the Forsytes, man and woman, grasping, losing, growing older, having children who suffered from what their parents had done, some finding happiness at last, some settling for second best, but all interesting and very human. It is said that the idea of British miniseries based on famous novels is what prompted PBS to create Masterpiece Theatre to satisfy the demand. (Coincidentally, at the time of this writing, the very first Masterpiece Theatre, "The First Churchills," is due at the time of this writing to come out on DVD from Acorn Media!)

I am sure many of you have watched the first third of the new version of "The Forsyte Saga" complete with color, the obligatory scenes in bed, and horse manure carefully piled up in the streets of London. Be advised that the 1967 version is a studio version, with several location shots, in glorious black and white, with a cast that is simply hard to beat or even match, and a tendency to be wonderfully addictive.

I have viewed the DVD version on 7 discs released by Warner Home Video on the BBC label. (Yes, that is 1300 minutes in all, followed by 2 hours of spellbinding, often extremely funny, "bonus" material on the 7th disc.) If you prefer video tapes, the series comes in two sets: The First Generation on 6 tapes, The Second Generation on 7 tapes. They do not contain any of the extra material, so be advised. Technically, the picture has been beautifully restored except for a second here and there when there is a slight blur, perhaps 10 seconds worth out of more than 21 hours hours, and now and then the sound does get a bit fuzzy. In fact, I remember that being true when this series was first telecast, so that is no fault of this restoration.

The major stars are Eric Porter (Soames Forstye), Nyree Dawn Porter (Irene), Kenneth Moore (young Jolyon Forsyte), and a pretty actress who made her reputation in this series, Susan Hampshire. I cannot begin to list the rest, all of which you can catch during the end titles and much of which you can find on the Internet Movie Data Base. Porter plays to perfection the "unlovable" man who cannot understand why he is so; and as the story unfolds, his partial mellowing, as played by Porter, is an example to all "modern" actors.

In the book, Irene is seen only through the consciousness of the other characters, and as good as Ms. Porter looks as Irene, her acting is a touch wooden for such a catalytic character. Still she looks far more striking than her counterpart in the 2002 version.

Galsworthy has been compared with Thackery, but he does not quite have the sweep of that earlier author. Still, the scene at a party after a lawsuit in which the loser is attracting all the attention while the winners are being cold-shouldered by their so-called friends is both painful and telling. (In fact, if it makes you think of "Chicago," you can see how far ahead Galsworthy was in his estimation of how we treat "morality.")

Of course this is high class soap opera, but the production values are quite good for a 1967 studio production, the acting superb, and the dialogue a bit more intelligent than you will find in the afternoon on commercial series. This set, on tapes or DVDs, is a real "grabbit." It afforded me nearly 22 hours of viewing pleasure and will do the same for you.


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

5 October 1969 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

A Forsyte Saga See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(26 episodes)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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