6.5/10
379
11 user 9 critic

Red, White and Zero (1967)

The White Bus (original title)
Not Rated | | Drama | 21 December 1979 (USA)
An impassive young girl is taken from her suicidal London life, back to her home in North England, on a bizarre bus trip. Seen through the poetic eye of the camera, this is a commentary of doomed British morbidity.

Director:

Lindsay Anderson

Writers:

Shelagh Delaney (screenplay), Shelagh Delaney (story)
Reviews

Watch Now

From $4.99 (SD) on Prime Video

Photos

Learn more

More Like This 

Short | Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.7/10 X  

An opera singer, dressed in full costume and dress, must navigate through the busy city streets to get to the theater in time for his performance.

Director: Peter Brook
Stars: Zero Mostel, Julia Foster, Frank Thornton
Red and Blue (1967)
Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

An English cabaret singer goes to Paris for a nightclub engagement, where the romantic image of her songs is very different from the reality of her solitary life.

Director: Tony Richardson
Stars: Vanessa Redgrave, Douglas Fairbanks Jr., John Bird
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

A documentary on the making of Lindsay Anderson's film The White Bus.

Director: John Fletcher
Stars: Lindsay Anderson, Miriam Brickman, Kevin Brownlow
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

In a Yorkshire mining town, three educated brothers return to their blue-collar home to celebrate the 40th Anniversary of their parents, but dark secrets come to the fore.

Director: Lindsay Anderson
Stars: Alan Bates, Brian Cox, Gabrielle Daye
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

Award winning director Lindsay Anderson (If..., O Lucky Man!) subverts the mockumentary genre and presents to the audience a detailed and humored account of what truly means to be Lindsay ... See full summary »

Director: Lindsay Anderson
Stars: Lindsay Anderson, Alexander Anderson, Murray Anderson
Documentary | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

Rüdiger Suchsland examines German cinema from 1933, when the Nazis came into power, until 1945 when the Third Reich collapsed.

Director: Rüdiger Suchsland
Stars: Hans Albers, Udo Kier, Heinz Rühmann
Drama | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

Diamonds in the night is the tense, brutal story of two Jewish boys who escape from a train transporting them from one concentration camp to another. Ultimately, they are hunted down by a ... See full summary »

Director: Jan Nemec
Stars: Ladislav Jánsky, Antonín Kumbera, Ilse Bischofova
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

Psychologist Dr. Matthew Clark is the head of the Crawthorne State Training Institute, one of the first boarding schools for developmentally challenged children. Dr. Clark is sympathetic ... See full summary »

Director: John Cassavetes
Stars: Burt Lancaster, Judy Garland, Gena Rowlands
Hamlet (1969)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

Nicol Williamson takes the lead role in this star-studded 1969 version of William Shakespeare's tragedy. Prince Hamlet mourns both his father's death and his mother's marriage to Claudius. ... See full summary »

Director: Tony Richardson
Stars: Nicol Williamson, Judy Parfitt, Anthony Hopkins
Comedy | Fantasy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

An introverted loner living in the bowels of the Astrodome plots to develop - with the aid of a mysterious guardian angel - a pair of wings that will help him fly.

Director: Robert Altman
Stars: Bud Cort, Shelley Duvall, Sally Kellerman
The Man in Room 17 (TV Series 1965)
Crime | Thriller | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.1/10 X  

Crime series about a secret government department, "Room 17", set up to deal with crimes that baffle police and government agencies. Headed by veteran World War II Agent Oldenshaw, and ... See full summary »

Stars: Richard Vernon, Denholm Elliott, Michael Aldridge
Comedy | Drama | Fantasy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

Don Juan is sent from Hell to Earth with a highly important mission - to seduce a 20-years virgin for spoiling her pure wedding. The mission becomes crazy when Don Juan falls in love for the first time in his centuries-old lover's career.

Director: Ingmar Bergman
Stars: Jarl Kulle, Bibi Andersson, Stig Järrel
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Patricia Healey ... The Girl
Arthur Lowe ... The Mayor
John Sharp ... Macebearer
Julie Perry Julie Perry ... Conductress
Stephen Moore Stephen Moore ... Young Man
Victor Henry Victor Henry ... Transistorite
John Savident ... Supporter
Fanny Carby Fanny Carby ... Supporter
Malcolm Taylor Malcolm Taylor ... Supporter
Allan O'Keefe Allan O'Keefe ... Supporter (as Alan O'Keefe)
Anthony Hopkins ... Brechtian
Jeanne Watts Jeanne Watts ... Fish Shop Woman
Eddie King Eddie King ... Fish Shop Man
Barry Evans ... Boy
Penny Ryder ... Girl
Edit

Storyline

An impassive young girl is taken from her suicidal London life, back to her home in North England, on a bizarre bus trip. Seen through the poetic eye of the camera, this is a commentary of doomed British morbidity.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

21 December 1979 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Red, White and Zero See more »

Filming Locations:

London, England, UK See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Holly Productions See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Black and White (Black & White and Color)| Color (Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

This was Sir Anthony Hopkins' film debut. See more »

Quotes

The Girl: [to suitor] I'll write.
See more »

Connections

Followed by Red and Blue (1967) See more »

Soundtracks

Resolution der Kommunarden
Performed by Anthony Hopkins
Lyrics by Bertolt Brecht / Music by Hanns Eisler
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Uncoordinated Instinctual Trends
23 September 2011 | by jzappaSee all my reviews

When I think about The White Bus, I think about how thoughts and ambiance spontaneously go on, because they do here just as they do in a person's mind. When I caught myself, during and after watching it, trying to pigeonhole whether it was supposed to be a hallucination, pure free association or a stream of consciousness, I hearkened back to my first experience seeing a movie directed by Lindsay Anderson, If…., which was a more realistic story, yes, but had a dreamlike lack of reason or cohesion for its stylistic and visual changeovers. Likewise, The White Bus is just a chain of imagery. But what makes it a consistent piece? Somehow, it is. Because I followed it and enjoyed it.

Maybe that goes to show that "invisible style," the avoidance of indulgent cinematography because a movie exposing itself diverts from the story, is not limited to the traditional studio era. The furthest extremities of avant-garde filmmaking can still be engrossing on that very level despite being so exuberantly stylized and even seemingly fragmentary. Regardless, The White Bus, like If…., is a blurring of various lines.

Lindsay Anderson and Shelagh Delaney's The White Bus is a dreamlike film about a secretary who takes a bizarre trip, part of which is set on the eponymous means of transportation. The anonymous woman has an apparently monotonous life, which is disrupted by episodic departures of imagination featuring suicide, recreations of paintings, and slices of meat that abruptly run blood-red. Flanked by these visions are the minutiae of her real life, particularly as she starts a passage home to pop in on her family. She comes across an eclectic assortment of people, an adolescent extremely annoyed that his rugby team lost, a young man who proposes marriage, a lord mayor who takes pleasure in feeling her leg, and more as she traverses to sites reaching from a community center and a public library to a natural history museum and a civil defense display. Throughout, the girl upholds a pretense of apathy or disregard, even when proceedings grow fairly unreal, as when all of her itinerant companions become human dummies in the course of the civil defense exercise. Ultimately, she enters a restaurant and eats dinner while the owners stack chairs around her, shrouding her from view and grumbling about the boundless movement of work.

So we leave having experienced the incessant tide of observation, feelings, mindset and recollections in an uninterrupted, even rambling manner of visual soliloquy. But so many transitions and scenes lack outside motivation, and yet somehow have the characteristics of real experiences in that they're lucid, significant and seen in the objective outside world. Is that not hallucination? Could they be real perceptions that are delusional, accurately seen things and people given extra implications? People are frequently at odds with their necessity to be secure with themselves and their suspicions of and resistance to change and self-exposure, intentional or not. There is no linear premeditation, just spontaneous bounds and connections that potentially bring about new individual revelations and values: the sense of overtone and suggestion are a sort of thinking id. That's what I admire about The White Bus.


6 of 7 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 11 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Popular Action and Adventure Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular action and adventure titles available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed