5.9/10
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What's Up, Tiger Lily? (1966)

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2:24 | Trailer
In Woody Allen's directorial debut, he took the Japanese action film Key of Keys (1965) and re-dubbed it, changing the plot to make it revolve around a secret egg salad recipe.

Writers:

Woody Allen (special material by), Frank Buxton (with writings by) | 7 more credits »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Woody Allen ... Woody Allen / Dub Voice / Projectionist
The Lovin' Spoonful The Lovin' Spoonful ... The Lovin' Spoonful
Frank Buxton ... Vocal Assist (voice)
Louise Lasser ... Suki Yaki (voice)
Julie Bennett ... Vocal Assist (voice)
Len Maxwell Len Maxwell ... Vocal Assist (voice)
Mickey Rose Mickey Rose ... Vocal Assist (voice)
Bryna Wilson Bryna Wilson ... Vocal Assist (voice)
Tatsuya Mihashi ... Phil Moscowitz (archive footage)
Mie Hama ... Teri Yaki (archive footage)
Akiko Wakabayashi ... Suki Yaki (archive footage) (as Kiko Wakabayashi)
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Storyline

Writer/director Woody Allen explains that when he was asked to supervise the making of the definitive spy thriller, what he decided to do was acquire the rights to a B-grade Japanese spy caper (Key of Keys (1965)) filmed with Japanese actors in Japanese, delete the existing soundtrack, and redub into English and reorder select scenes to create an entirely new movie, a comedy, having nothing to do with the original story-line. The result... International spy Phil Moscowitz, working out of the Asia bureau, is a self-professed lovable rogue with sex always on his mind. He inadvertently gets involved in a mission, the client the Grand Exalted High Majah of Raspur. The success of the mission will determine if Raspur, a non-existent country that nonetheless sounds real, will indeed become real. Moscowitz is to retrieve something stolen from the Majah by criminal Shepherd Wong: the best ever egg salad recipe. Phil is to be assisted by two of the Majah's own agents, sisters Teri and Suki Yaki... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

WOODY ALLEN'S lowdown on how to make a Chinese fortune 'kookie' See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The soundtrack album to What's Up Tiger Lily? was released in 1966. It contains music by The Lovin' Spoonful. The audio engineer at National Recording Studios was Fred Weinberg, who went on to produce and engineer many other films and albums. It was re-released on CD along with You're a Big Boy Now, the Spoonful's soundtrack for the 1966 film by Francis Ford Coppola. It reached No. 126 on the Billboard Pop Albums charts. See more »

Goofs

When the Port of Yokohama is shown, the captions call it "Yokahama". See more »

Quotes

Suki Yaki: I managed to find a woman's dress but I couldn't find a stitch of underwear.
Phil Moscowitz: No underwear, huh? I find that very interesting.
Suki Yaki: Don't excite yourself. I never sleep with a man who owns a dress.
Phil Moscowitz: Me neither. I feel the same way.
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Crazy Credits

In the closing credits, Woody Allen watches a striptease. The credits appear on the right side of the screen as the striptease goes on and at the end there is a statement: "And if you have been reading this instead of looking at the girl, then see your psychiatrist, or go to a good eye doctor." And then an eye chart appears. See more »

Alternate Versions

Over 20 years ago this film was acquired by Castle Hill Productions. The version that they have been distributing in the U.S. has been altered from the original version distributed by American International. These changes are primarily changes in the comic dubbed dialogue. For example, Kumi Mizuno chases after a car and yells "Hey! You've got my vibrator!" in the original U.S. version. This line has been changed to "Hey! That's a rented car!" See more »

Connections

Featured in TCM Guest Programmer: Alton Brown (2007) See more »

User Reviews

 
One of the few Woody Allen films that doesn't work for me
14 January 2005 | by BrandtSponsellerSee all my reviews

Woody Allen gives a Japanese-directed James Bond-styled actioner a new soundtrack, including different dialogue telling a new story. Allen's changes turn the film into a spy versus spy quest for the recipe of the world's best egg salad.

I'm a huge Woody Allen fan. The idea behind this film is promising and the basic premise of Allen's story, grafted on to a pre-existing film, International Secret Police: Key of Keys (Kokusai himitsu keisatsu: Kagi no kagi), from 1965, by Senkichi Taniguchi, is funny, if silly. However, this is one of the very few Allen films that just doesn't work for me. The Taniguchi film seems chopped up to a point of incoherence (maybe it's presented here in its entirety and in the same order, but that would mean that its running time is around 60 minutes or less), although that could be a factor of the changed dialogue. I found myself wishing there was an alternate soundtrack that was a legitimate dubbing of the original film.

Although there are a few very funny scenes, one-liners and ideas in Allen's new story, most of it isn't very funny. Too many scenes seem like they may be serious translations of the Japanese dialogue. There are too many occurrences of silly vocal noises, but not enough to make that a motif so that it's funny. There are too many long sections where the film is mostly boring. The untranslated beginning goes on far too long. The mini-interview with Allen that explains the film's premise would only be funny if it weren't true. The Lovin' Spoonful scenes aren't funny, and perhaps weren't intended to be--they seem like a studio attempt to try to put more butts in theater seats upon the film's release by featuring a popular rock group. It doesn't seem like Allen spent much time on this—the dialogue seems largely improvised and mostly disjointed. In short, the film is basically a mess, and only worth viewing for Woody Allen completist, and men with a serious Asian woman fetish (it's also worth noting that Taniguchi seems to share a foot fetish).

What would have worked better, and probably would have made the film much funnier, is if Allen would have written and directed both the film that we're seeing visually and a completely different story for the soundtrack. Much more time would have to be spent crafting each component to make them seem unrelated but coherent and funny. That's an experiment that remains to be done, to my knowledge.

There are enough positive aspects that the film doesn't deserve a 1--as I noted, there are times that What's Up, Tiger Lily is funny--but the best I can do is a 5 out of 10.


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Details

Country:

Japan | USA

Language:

English | Japanese

Release Date:

2 November 1966 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Woody Allen's What's Up, Tiger Lily? See more »

Filming Locations:

Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (DVD)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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