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Marat/Sade ()


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In an insane asylum, Marquis de Sade directs Jean Paul Marat's last days through a theater play. The actors are the patients.

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Marquis de Sade
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Jean-Paul Marat
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Herald
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Monsieur Coulmier
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Charlotte Corday
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Cucurucu
Hugh Sullivan ...
Kokol
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Newly Rich Lady
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A Mad Animal
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Polpoch
Jeanette Landis ...
Rossignol
Robert Langdon Lloyd ...
Jacques Roux (as Robert Lloyd)
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Monsieur Dupere
James Mellor ...
Schoolmaster
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Father
John Harwood ...
Voltaire
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Lavoisier
Susan Williamson ...
Simone Evrard
Carol Raymont ...
Patient
Mary Allen ...
Patient
Brenda Kempner ...
Madame Coulmier
Mark Jones ...
Mother
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Patient
Tamara Fuerst ...
Patient
Sheila Grant ...
Patient
Lynn Pinkney ...
Patient
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Military Representative
Ruth Baker ...
Mademoiselle Coulmier
Michael Farnsworth ...
Patient
Guy Gordon ...
Patient
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Patient
Heather Canning ...
Nun
Jennifer Tudor ...
Nun
Tim Hardy ...
Guard (as Timothy Hardy)
Stanford Trowell ...
Guard

Directed by

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Peter Brook

Written by

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Peter Weiss ... (play)
 
Geoffrey Skelton ... (English translation by)
 
Adrian Mitchell ... (verse adaptation)
 
Adrian Mitchell ... (screen adaptation)

Produced by

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Michael Birkett ... producer

Music by

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Richard Peaslee

Cinematography by

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David Watkin

Film Editing by

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Tom Priestley

Editorial Department

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Rex Pyke ... assistant editor

Production Design by

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Sally Jacobs

Art Direction by

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Edward Marshall ... (as Ted Marshall)

Costume Design by

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John Hales
Lynn Hope
Gunilla Palmstierna-Weiss ... (uncredited) (costumes)

Makeup Department

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Alan Boyle ... makeup designer / wig designer
Ken Lintott ... makeup designer / wig designer
Bunty Phillips ... makeup
Betty Sherriff ... hairdresser

Production Management

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Jack Swinburne ... production manager

Second Unit Director or Assistant Director

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Anthony Waye ... first assistant director (as Anthony Way)
Ariel Levy ... second assistant director (uncredited)

Sound Department

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Bob Allen ... sound recordist (as Robert Allen)
Robin Clegg ... boom operator
Hugh Strain ... dubbing mixer

Camera and Electrical Department

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Wally Byatt ... focus puller
Jim Day ... camera operator
Roy Ford ... focus puller
Nigel Cousins ... clapper loader (uncredited)

Music Department

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Richard Callinan ... musician
Mike Gould ... musician
Patrick Gowers ... composer: title music / musical director
Paul Hiley ... musician
Nicholas Moes ... musician
Rainer Schulein ... musician

Other crew

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Malcolm Goddard ... choreographer
Josephine Knowles ... continuity
Diana Stanley ... stage manager
Crew verified as complete

Production Companies

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Distributors

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Special Effects

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Other Companies

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Storyline

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Plot Summary

July 13, 1808 at the Charenton Insane Asylum just outside Paris. The inmates of the asylum are mounting their latest theatrical production, written and produced by who is probably the most famous inmate of the facility, the Marquis de Sade. The asylum's director, M. Coulmier, a supporter of the current French regime led by Napoleon, encourages this artistic expression as therapy for the inmates, while providing the audience - the aristocracy - a sense that they are being progressive in inmate treatments. Coulmier as the master of ceremonies, his wife and daughter in special places of honor, and the cast, all of whom are performing the play in the asylum's bath house, are separated from the audience by prison bars. The play is a retelling of a period in the French Revolution culminating with the assassination exactly fifteen years earlier of revolutionary Jean-Paul Marat by peasant girl, Charlotte Corday. The play is to answer whether Marat was a friend or foe to the people of France. In the primary roles are a paranoiac with a skin condition (much as Marat had himself) as Marat, a narcoleptic with melancholia as Corday, and a sexual manic as M. Dupere. Coulmier feels he needs to intervene anytime during the performance when things get out of hand. The Marquis may have ulterior motives in the telling of this story, he who plays a large role on stage, especially in his discussions with the Marat character about the nature of the revolution and the differences in their individual motives concerning the revolution. As the inmates perform a story of revolution, they may subconsciously be sucked into the story mirroring their own struggles with authority. Real life and the actors' afflictions may also dictate how the performance turns out. Written by Huggo

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Additional Details

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Also Known As
  • The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat as Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum at Charenton Under the Direction of the Marquis de Sade (United Kingdom)
  • Forfølgelsen af og mordet på Jean-Paul Marat opført af patienterne på sindsygehospitalet i Charenton under ledelse af Marquis de Sade (Denmark)
  • Jean-Paul Marat üldöztetése és meggyilkolása, ahogy a charentoni elmegyógyintézet színjátszói előadják De Sade úr betanításában (Hungary)
  • Η δολοφονία του Μαρά (Greece)
  • Mordet på Marat (Sweden)
  • See more »
Runtime
  • 116 min
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Did You Know?

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Trivia Patrick Magee won the 1966 Tony Award (New York City) for Supporting or Features Actor in a Drama for "Marat/Sade" as Marquis de Sade recreating his role in this production. See more »
Movie Connections Featured in Changing Stages (2000). See more »
Crazy Credits The opening credits - the play's title, stage credits and the actors appearing in the film - pop on the screen, one word at a time, until it is filled. The closing credits - the film's production staff - start off with a full screen of words; they then pop off the screen, one word at a time, until it is completely empty...just as it was when the film began. See more »
Quotes Marquis de Sade: And what's the point of a revolution without general copulation?
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