7.2/10
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Grand Prix (1966)

Approved | | Drama, Sport | 21 December 1966 (USA)
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American Grand Prix driver Pete Aron is fired by his Jordan-BRM racing team after a crash at Monaco that injures his British teammate, Scott Stoddard. While Stoddard struggles to recover, ... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(screen story), (screenplay)
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Won 3 Oscars. Another 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
... Pete Aron
... Louise Frederickson
... Jean-Pierre Sarti
... Izo Yamura (as Toshiro Mifune)
... Scott Stoddard
... Pat
... Nino Barlini (as Antonio Sabàto)
... Lisa
... Agostini Manetta
... Hugo Simon
Enzo Fiermonte ... Guido
... Monique Delvaux-Sarti (as Genevieve Page)
... Jeff Jordan
... Wallace Bennett (as Donal O'Brien)
Jean Michaud ... Children's Father
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Storyline

American Grand Prix driver Pete Aron is fired by his Jordan-BRM racing team after a crash at Monaco that injures his British teammate, Scott Stoddard. While Stoddard struggles to recover, Aron begins to drive for the Japanese Yamura team, and becomes romantically involved with Stoddard's estranged wife. Written by Damian Penny <g0mb@unb.ca>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Glamour! Speed! Spectacle! See more »

Genres:

Drama | Sport

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

| | |

Release Date:

21 December 1966 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A nagy verseny  »

Filming Locations:

 »

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Box Office

Budget:

$9,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$20,845,016
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System) (70 mm prints)| (35 mm prints)

Color:

(Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.20 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In the scene at the reception after Sarti wins at Monaco, Hugo comments that Sarti can now talk to kings. Sarti replies that so can any man, but will the kings listen? Or something to that effect. This is an obvious paraphrase of a famous part of Shakespeare's Henry IV, Part I, Act III, Scene i, lines 53-55: Welshman Owen Glendower: "I can call spirits from the vasty deep." Harry Hotspur: "Why, so can I, or so can any man. But will they come when you do call for them?" See more »

Goofs

During the Brands Hatch race, Phil Hill and Yamura are watching the action on track from the pit lane. They face the part of the circuit behind the pit lane. Pete Aron's car has developed a fault and Phil Hill shouts, noticing that Aron's car is leaking fuel. The cars continue around the circuit and come onto the pit-straight. Aron's car is now on fire. Phil Hill now proclaims 'it's on fire!' but he is still in the viewpoint that he was before, meaning that he would've been looking in completely the wrong direction and would not have seen the flaming car from that precise point. See more »

Quotes

Nino Barlini: [With a Japanese maiden on each arm] Hey, sayonara!
Scott Stoddard: My goodness, Nino, I thought they belonged to the Yamura boys.
Nino Barlini: I have them on temporary loan.
Pat Stoddard: Really, two of them?
Nino Barlini: They are very small. See you later, maybe!
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Connections

Referenced in Schlock! The Secret History of American Movies (2001) See more »

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User Reviews

A Technically Superb Film
12 April 2000 | by See all my reviews

I won't bore you with the plotline; you can get all that elsewhere. The main reason one should see this film is for the camera effects. And remember too -- these were all done the hard way; there was no computer imaging back in 1966!

If you get the chance to see this in a theater, DO NOT BE LATE!! The opening -- with the driver plugging his ears with cotton before putting on his helmet -- is aptly appropriate. The split-screen and multiple-image effects are first seen in the opening and crop up throughout the movie -- and always to good advantage, not just a "gee whiz, look what we can do" use of technique and technology. ESPN and the other networks, in their NASCAR telecasts, have just now started to adopt techniques first used by Frankenheimer 30-plus years ago.

One of the best scenes in the film is in the early minutes. You are actually *in* the cockpit of a F-1 car as it spins out of control, slides off the track, and launches itself into the harbor. I might add that this was *NOT* done with models, but used real, full-sized cars and took long hours to produce -- and these were truly "state-of-the-art" effects in 1966 (I won't give away the secrets here but will say that if you can locate a copy of the appropriate issue of "Popular Mechanics" [March 1966?] you will enjoy the article about the film and the techniques). The end result was about 15 seconds of some of the best racing footage committed to film. Needless to say, this is a very quick-running sequence!

I saw this picture in Cinerama in 1966, and I too echo the sentiment for a re-release of this picture to the large screen. More is the pity that Cinerama is no more. There are few pictures where Cinerama could be used to its fullest advantage; the in-car and on-track sequences of this film, however, were some of those.


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