7.2/10
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128 user 46 critic

Grand Prix (1966)

Approved | | Drama, Sport | 21 December 1966 (USA)
Trailer
3:59 | Trailer
American Grand Prix driver Pete Aron is fired by his Jordan-BRM racing team after a crash at Monaco that injures his British teammate, Scott Stoddard.

Director:

John Frankenheimer

Writers:

Robert Alan Aurthur (screen story), Robert Alan Aurthur (screenplay)
Won 3 Oscars. Another 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
James Garner ... Pete Aron
Eva Marie Saint ... Louise Frederickson
Yves Montand ... Jean-Pierre Sarti
Toshirô Mifune ... Izo Yamura (as Toshiro Mifune)
Brian Bedford ... Scott Stoddard
Jessica Walter ... Pat
Antonio Sabato ... Nino Barlini (as Antonio Sabàto)
Françoise Hardy ... Lisa
Adolfo Celi ... Agostini Manetta
Claude Dauphin ... Hugo Simon
Enzo Fiermonte ... Guido
Geneviève Page ... Monique Delvaux-Sarti (as Genevieve Page)
Jack Watson ... Jeff Jordan
Donald O'Brien ... Wallace Bennett (as Donal O'Brien)
Jean Michaud Jean Michaud ... Children's Father
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Storyline

American Grand Prix driver Pete Aron is fired by his Jordan-BRM racing team after a crash at Monaco that injures his British teammate, Scott Stoddard. While Stoddard struggles to recover, Aron begins to drive for the Japanese Yamura team, and becomes romantically involved with Stoddard's estranged wife. Written by Damian Penny <g0mb@unb.ca>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

CINERAMA sweeps YOU into a drama of speed and spectacle! See more »

Genres:

Drama | Sport

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Being a film from the mid-sixties it suffered from the extremely common problem of featuring dance music that didn't resemble any popular music of the day and was so far out of date that teens of the day thought it was ridiculous. One of the benefits of the boomer generation was that they eventually reached the age of influence that film scores would begin to better reflect reality. See more »

Goofs

After Jean Pierre crashes he is helped out of his car. He pulls his goggles part way down as they are now just under his lip and covering his chin. The view then cuts to a close-up of Jean Pierre's face and the goggles are not over his face any more. See more »

Quotes

Louise Frederickson: I work for an American fashion magazine. We're going to do an issue around racing cars.
Jean-Pierre Sarti: Yes! Now I have it! Of course: Louise Frederickson. You once did an article about my wife, Monique Delvaux. "One of the 27 best-dressed businesswomen in the world." - or something like that.
Louise Frederickson: Only ten. You were away at the time, as I recall.
Jean-Pierre Sarti: [recalling the article] Yes... "While... while her husband is off racing motor cars, this busy woman executive spends long hours in her office administering the complex ...
[...]
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Soundtracks

The Star Spangled Banner
(instrumental)
Written by John Stafford Smith
See more »

User Reviews

A Technically Superb Film
12 April 2000 | by BikeBillSee all my reviews

I won't bore you with the plotline; you can get all that elsewhere. The main reason one should see this film is for the camera effects. And remember too -- these were all done the hard way; there was no computer imaging back in 1966!

If you get the chance to see this in a theater, DO NOT BE LATE!! The opening -- with the driver plugging his ears with cotton before putting on his helmet -- is aptly appropriate. The split-screen and multiple-image effects are first seen in the opening and crop up throughout the movie -- and always to good advantage, not just a "gee whiz, look what we can do" use of technique and technology. ESPN and the other networks, in their NASCAR telecasts, have just now started to adopt techniques first used by Frankenheimer 30-plus years ago.

One of the best scenes in the film is in the early minutes. You are actually *in* the cockpit of a F-1 car as it spins out of control, slides off the track, and launches itself into the harbor. I might add that this was *NOT* done with models, but used real, full-sized cars and took long hours to produce -- and these were truly "state-of-the-art" effects in 1966 (I won't give away the secrets here but will say that if you can locate a copy of the appropriate issue of "Popular Mechanics" [March 1966?] you will enjoy the article about the film and the techniques). The end result was about 15 seconds of some of the best racing footage committed to film. Needless to say, this is a very quick-running sequence!

I saw this picture in Cinerama in 1966, and I too echo the sentiment for a re-release of this picture to the large screen. More is the pity that Cinerama is no more. There are few pictures where Cinerama could be used to its fullest advantage; the in-car and on-track sequences of this film, however, were some of those.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | French | Italian | Japanese

Release Date:

21 December 1966 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Grand Prix See more »

Filming Locations:

Farnborough Hall, Warwickshire See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$9,000,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

70 mm 6-Track (Westrex Recording System) (70 mm prints)| Mono (35 mm prints)

Color:

Color (Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.20 : 1
See full technical specs »

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