A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (1966) - News Poster

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Social Roundup: BroadwayWorld Fans Dreamcast Pseudolus from A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To The Forum!

We asked, and you answered As BroadwayWorld previously reported, the classic musical comedy A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum just celebrated the anniversary of its opening night on Broadway To celebrate, we asked BroadwayWorld readers to name the stars that they would love to see take on the iconic role of Pseudolus. Check out some of your most popular answers below
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Exclusive Podcast: Go 'Behind the Curtain' with Iconic Set Designer Tony Walton

The one and only Tony Walton, one of Broadway's most innovating and influential set designers, invites Rob and Kevin into his apartment to look back on his career which includes the Oscar, the Tony, the Emmy, and designing such musicals as the original A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To The Forum, Golden Boy, The Apple Tree, Pippin, Chicago, Grand Hotel, Six Degrees of Separation, revivals of Anything Goes, Guys and Dolls, and such movies as Murder on the Orient Express, All That Jazz, and Mary Poppins
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Nathan Lane Joins Showtime’s ‘Penny Dreadful: City of Angels’

  • Variety
Nathan Lane Joins Showtime’s ‘Penny Dreadful: City of Angels’
Nathan Lane is officially the latest addition to the cast of the upcoming Showtime series “Penny Dreadful: City of Angels,” Variety has learned.

Lane will play Lewis Michener. A veteran officer in the Lapd, wise to the ways of the world and ruthless in pursuit of his goals, Lewis becomes the partner and mentor of fellow cop Tiago Vega (Daniel Zovatto). In addition to Zovatto, Lane joins a cast that already includes Natalie Dormer, Jessica Garza and Johnathan Nieves

A veteran of stage and screen, Lane has won three Tony Awards during his career for “The Producers,” “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum,” and “Angels in America.” He has also been nominated for six Emmy Awards for guest starring roles on shows including “Frasier” and “Modern Family.” Lane’s recent TV credits also include “American Crime Story: The People v. Oj Simpson,” “Difficult People,” and “The Good Wife.
See full article at Variety »

The Wrong Box

Director Bryan Forbes tries his hand at comedy. His nostalgic Victorian farce features an eclectic choice of Brit stars — established greats John Mills & Ralph Richardson, the freshly-minted Michael Caine, reigning jester Peter Sellers and even a debut for the collegiate pranksters Peter Cook & Dudley Moore. It’s a beaut of a production with a charming John Barry music score… but the result yields more indulgent smiles than out-and-out laughs.

The Wrong Box

Region A+B Blu-ray

Powerhouse Indicator

1966 / Color / 1:75 widescreen / 105 min. / Street Date November 23, 2018 / available from Amazon UK / £14.99

Starring: John Mills, Ralph Richardson, Michael Caine, Peter Cook, Dudley Moore, Nanette Newman, Tony Hancock, Peter Sellers, Wilfrid Lawson, Thorley Walters, Gerald Sim, Irene Handl, Norman Bird, John Le Mesurier, Norman Rossington, Diane Clare, Tutte Lemkow, Charles Bird, Vanda Godsell, Jeremy Lloyd, James Villiers, Graham Stark, Dick Gregory, Valentine Dyall, Leonard Rossiter, André Morell, Temperance Seven, Andrea Allan, Juliet Mills.

Cinematography:
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Nathan Lane movies: 10 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Birdcage,’ ‘The Lion King,’ ‘The Producers’

  • Gold Derby
Nathan Lane movies: 10 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Birdcage,’ ‘The Lion King,’ ‘The Producers’
Nathan Lane will celebrate his 63rd birthday on February 3, 2019. The actor has spent the majority of his career on Broadway and the New York theater, but he has also had a good run on television and in film.

Lane worked his way up through the ranks of off-Broadway and regional theater prior to making his Broadway debut in 1983. The actor was born Joe Lane, but he changed it to Nathan because another actor had already claimed his birth one in the unions. He chose the name because one of his favorite roles was that of Nathan Detroit in “Guys and Dolls,” a part which would earn him his first Tony nomination in 1992. He would go on to win three Tony Awards in his Broadway career: two as Best Actor in a Musical for “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum” in 1996 and “The Producers” in 2001; and a
See full article at Gold Derby »

Nathan Lane movies: 10 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Nathan Lane movies: 10 greatest films ranked worst to best
Nathan Lane will celebrate his 63rd birthday on February 3, 2019. The actor has spent the majority of his career on Broadway and the New York theater, but he has also had a good run on television and in film.

Lane worked his way up through the ranks of off-Broadway and regional theater prior to making his Broadway debut in 1983. The actor was born Joe Lane, but he changed it to Nathan because another actor had already claimed his birth one in the unions. He chose the name because one of his favorite roles was that of Nathan Detroit in “Guys and Dolls,” a part which would earn him his first Tony nomination in 1992. He would go on to win three Tony Awards in his Broadway career: two as Best Actor in a Musical for “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum” in 1996 and “The Producers” in 2001; and a
See full article at Gold Derby »

2019 Broadway spring season preview of plays: Which will be remembered by the Tony Awards?

2019 Broadway spring season preview of plays: Which will be remembered by the Tony Awards?
As we’re now about halfway through the Broadway season, there are currently eight productions of plays set to open this spring. Could we be seeing any of them contend at this year’s Tony Awards? Below, we recap the plot of each play as well as the awards history of its author, cast, creative types, the opening, and (where applicable) closing dates.

“Choir Boy” (opens January 8; closes March 10)

In this new play by Oscar winner Tarell Alvin McCraney, the story centers on the Charles R. Drew Prep School for Boys, which for a half a century has been dedicated to the education of strong, ethical black men. One talented student has been waiting for years to take his rightful place as the leader of the school’s legendary gospel choir. But can he make his way through the hallowed halls of this institution if he sings in his own key?
See full article at Gold Derby »

Actor and Activist Rodney Kageyama Dies at 77

  • Variety
Actor and Activist Rodney Kageyama Dies at 77
Actor, activist and influentials member of the Japanese American community, Rodney Kageyama, died in his sleep Dec. 9. He was 77.

The SAG member was known for roles in “Karate Kid IV” with Hillary Swank, Ron Howard’s film “Gung Ho” and the spinoff sitcom, and the TV movie “Hiroshima: Out of the Ashes” with Max Von Sydow.

Kageyama was an important activist for the Asian American community. He was a regular emcee in downtown Los Angeles’ Little Tokyo, and was praised for using his voice to advocate for Asian American representation in the entertainment industry. A member of several social activist groups and community organizations, Kageyama was associated with The Asian American Pacific Artists Association, The Coalition of Asian Pacifics in Entertainment (Cape), East West Players, The Japanese American National Museum, and Nisei Week Japanese Festival.

Before he moved to Los Angeles in 1979, Kageyama began his acting career in San Francisco
See full article at Variety »

Director Nicolas Roeg Dead At Age 90

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Nicolas Roeg, the supremely talented British cinematographer who ultimately became an acclaimed director, has died at age 90. Roeg's unique eye for filming scenes in a creative manner gained him a reputation in the movie industry  in the 1960s. He was a second-unit photographer on David Lean's "Lawrence of Arabia" and contributed to Lean's "Doctor Zhivago". By 1964, he was credited as Director of Photography on Roger Corman's "The Masque of the Red Death", one of the most stylishly filmed Corman horror productions. Soon, he found himself constantly in demand. Other films he photographed included "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum", "Far from the Madding Crowd" and "Petulia". He also contributed to the 1967 spoof version of "Casino Royale".

Roeg next moved into the Director's chair with the bizarre and controversial 1970 crime film "Performance" that has since become a cult classic. Better received was
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Whoopi Goldberg movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, including ‘The Color Purple,’ ‘Ghost,’ ‘Sister Act’

  • Gold Derby
Whoopi Goldberg movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, including ‘The Color Purple,’ ‘Ghost,’ ‘Sister Act’
Whoopi Goldberg celebrates her 63rd birthday on November 13, 2018. The actress, comedian, and talk show host has had one of the most varied careers in show business and has even achieved the Egot, which has come to symbolize success across the board in all mediums.

Goldberg won her Oscar as Best Supporting Actress for the film “Ghost.” She had previously been nominated for her screen debut for Steven Spielberg in “The Color Purple” and stood a good chance at becoming the first African-American woman to win Best Actress, but controversy surrounding the film’s depiction of black men scared voters away from the film and it lost all 11 of its nominations.

Goldberg’s Emmy wins both came for daytime work. Her first win was for hosting a documentary about Hattie McDaniel of “Gone With the Wind,” the Best Supporting Actress for that film. She also won a second Emmy for her
See full article at Gold Derby »

Whoopi Goldberg movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Whoopi Goldberg movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best
Whoopi Goldberg celebrates her 63rd birthday on November 13, 2018. The actress, comedian, and talk show host has had one of the most varied careers in show business and has even achieved the Egot, which has come to symbolize success across the board in all mediums.

Goldberg won her Oscar as Best Supporting Actress for the film “Ghost.” She had previously been nominated for her screen debut for Steven Spielberg in “The Color Purple” and stood a good chance at becoming the first African-American woman to win Best Actress, but controversy surrounding the film’s depiction of black men scared voters away from the film and it lost all 11 of its nominations.

Goldberg’s Emmy wins both came for daytime work. Her first win was for hosting a documentary about Hattie McDaniel of “Gone With the Wind,” the Best Supporting Actress for that film. She also won a second Emmy for her
See full article at Gold Derby »

10 Stars Who Just Need an Emmy to Egot, From Elton John to Stephen Sondheim (Photos)

  • The Wrap
10 Stars Who Just Need an Emmy to Egot, From Elton John to Stephen Sondheim (Photos)
Henry Fonda, actor (1905-82)

Grammy: Best Spoken Word Album, “Great Documents” (1977)

Oscar: Best Actor, “On Golden Pond” (1981)

Tony: Best Actor, “Mister Roberts” (1948); Best Actor, “Clarence Darrow” (1975)

Oscar Hammerstein II, lyricist and producer (1895-1960)

Grammy: Best Original Cast Album, “The Sound of Music” (1960)

Oscar: Best Original Song, “The Last Time I Saw Paris” from “Lady Be Good” (1941); “It Might As Well Be Spring” from “State Fair” (1945)

Tony: Three awards for “South Pacific” (1950); Best Musical, “The King and I” (1952); Best Musical, “The Sound of Music” (1960)

Elton John

Grammy: Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group, “That’s What Friends Are For” (1986); Best Instrumental Composition, “Basque” (1991); Best Male Pop Vocal Performance, “Can You Feel the Love Tonight” (1994); Best Male Pop Vocal Performance, “Candle in the Wind” (1997); Best Show Album, “Aida” (2000)

Oscar: Best Original Son, “Can You Feel the Love Tonight” from “The Lion King” (1994)

Tony: Best Score, “Aida” (2000)

John Legend, songwriter and
See full article at The Wrap »

Will Tony Shalhoub (‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’) and Laurie Metcalf (‘Roseanne’) win Emmys after Tony victories?

The Tony Awards just toasted the best productions and performers of the past Broadway season, and in a few weeks two of the big winners there — Tony Shalhoub and Laurie Metcalf — may find themselves feted with nominations for Emmy Awards, too.

Shalhoub, who is a strong contender at the Emmys for the Amazon comedy series “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” took home his first Tony Award his leading role in the musical “The Band’s Visit.” Metcalf, who is in the running at the Emmys for reprising her award-winning role on the reboot of sitcom “Roseanne,” claimed her second consecutive Tony this year for her brilliant performance in Edward Albee’s “Three Tall Women.”

See 2018 Tony Awards: Complete list of winners (and nominees) in all 26 categories

According to Gold Derby’s current combined odds, Shalhoub is on the cusp of a nomination for Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series behind Sean Hayes
See full article at Gold Derby »

Hollywood Flashback: Buster Keaton Was Comedy Royalty in the 1920s

Hollywood Flashback: Buster Keaton Was Comedy Royalty in the 1920s
The Hollywood Reporter began publishing. Both the American Film Institute and Keaton himself considered his finest film to be 1926's The General, the big-budgeted silent comedy that he co-directed and starred in. But THR was around in 1966 for his final acting appearance, in A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, released eight months after his death from lung cancer at 70. (As for Forum, THR said, "To ordinary moviegoers, it may prove a puzzlement.")

Keaton's career began in his early 20s when he worked with Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle ...

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See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Tony Awards 2018: Records, milestones and fun facts about this year’s winners include ‘The Band’s Visit,’ ‘Harry Potter,’ Laurie Metcalf …

Tony Awards 2018: Records, milestones and fun facts about this year’s winners include ‘The Band’s Visit,’ ‘Harry Potter,’ Laurie Metcalf …
Out of all the winners (and losers) in the 26 competitive categories at the 2018 Tony Awards, several of them stand out as particularly noteworthy when considered in the context of history. So what were this year’s most interesting facts, records and milestones?

“The Band’s Visit” is the first Best Musical winner to have been based on a movie since “Kinky Boots” in 2013. Of its 11 Tony nominations it managed to win a whopping 10 awards (including Best Musical). The only prize it didn’t end up taking home was Best Scenic Design of a Musical for Scott Pask. It is now tied with “Hello, Dolly!” (1964) and “Billy Elliot” (2009) as the third most awarded production in Tony history, behind “The Producers” with 12 wins in 2001 and “Hamilton” with 11 victories in 2016.

“The Band’s Visit” is also the first Best Musical winner to have won every single acting award it was nominated for since
See full article at Gold Derby »

Tony Awards 2018: ‘Harry Potter,’ ‘Angels in America’ Win Big

  • Variety
Tony Awards 2018: ‘Harry Potter,’ ‘Angels in America’ Win Big
“Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two” nabbed best play and “Angels in America” was recognized as best play revival in an emotional Tony Awards that mixed Broadway razzle-dazzle with politically-charged calls to arms.

Ostensibly a celebration of theater, the Tonys were also an opportunity for Broadway to talk up the virtues of inclusion and diversity, while also drawing attention to gay rights and gun control. Without directly mentioning President Donald Trump or Trump-ism by name, winners and presenters at the Tonys made it clear that their sympathies are with the resistance. Many wore pins trumpeting movements such as Time’s Up or ribbons highlighting left-leaning organizations such as the Aclu.

Tony Kushner, the playwright behind “Angels in America,” was most explicit, urging people to get out and vote in the mid-term elections in November. Telling viewers they have “21 weeks to save our democracy and heal our planet.”

Andrew Garfield won the Tony Award for best leading actor in a play for his work as Prior Walter, the AIDS-stricken prophet at the center of “Angels in America.” In a teary speech, Garfield said playing Walter was the biggest honor of his life.
See full article at Variety »

NKotB’s Joey McIntyre Moving from His Hancock Park Block (Exclusive)

  • Variety
NKotB’s Joey McIntyre Moving from His Hancock Park Block (Exclusive)
Joey McIntyre, the youngest member of the pioneering and hugely popular boy band The New Kids on the Block, a.k.a. NKotB, put his longtime family home on a particularly plum and picturesquely tree-lined block in L.A.’s historic Hancock Park ‘hood up for sale at $5.795 million. Mcintyre, who hasn’t had the kind of searing global success as a solo artist he enjoyed with NKotB but has none-the-less released half of a dozen solo albums and appeared in scads of television shows, “The Hotwives of Orlando,” “The McCarthys” and “Return of the Mac” among them, along with a variety of theater performances including, most recently, Stephen Sondheim’s “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum” at the Garry Marshall Theatre in Burbank, Calif., acquired the stately, stone-accented residence with his wife Barrett in April 2007 for $4.45 million. The listing, which makes no secret of the home’s celebrity ownership,
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Nathan Lane (‘Angels in America’) could win third Tony Award, first for a play

Nathan Lane (‘Angels in America’) could win third Tony Award, first for a play
Nathan Lane has won two Tony Awards from five nominations. This year, with his acclaimed turn as notorious attorney Roy Cohn in the Broadway revival of”Angels in America,” Lane hopes to claim his third Tony and first for a performance in a play.

Tony Kushner won the 1993 Pulitzer Prize and Tony for this play about the early days of AIDS. Lane portrays Cohn who, in 1985, is deeply closeted and has recently learned he has been infected. Cohn finds himself alone in the hospital, judged by those around him, including the ghost of Ethel Rosenberg, who was executed alongside husband Julius following Cohn’s successful prosecution at their espionage trial.

Ben Brantley‘s review in The New York Times was a love letter: “Taking on a role memorably embodied by Ron Leibman and Al Pacino, among others, he provides a fresh-as-toxic-paint interpretation that embraces extremes — of viciousness and, more surprisingly tenderness — without stripping gears.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Westport Country Playhouse Announces Reading Starring Joanna Gleason, Chris Sarandon, Lenny Wolpe and More

Westport Country Playhouse will present a Script in Hand playreading of 'Better Late,' a romantic comedy by Larry Gelbart, on Monday, February 26, at 7 p.m. Gelbart was a creator and producer of the television series 'Mash,' and a co-writer of the film 'Tootsie' and the Broadway musicals 'City of Angels' and 'A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum.'
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

2018 Broadway spring season preview of plays: Which will be remembered by the Tony Awards?

In the last four months of the 2017-18 Broadway season, nine productions of plays (two new, five revivals, two older works making their Broadway debuts) will open. Could we be seeing any of them contend at this year’s Tony Awards?

Below, we recap the plot of each play as well as the awards history of its author, cast and creative types and the opening and (where applicable) closing dates.

John Lithgow: Stories By Heart” (opening January 11; closing March 4)

Virtuosity and imagination combine in one utterly unique event, as Tony and Emmy Award winner John Lithgow creates a singularly intimate evening. With equal measures of humor and heart, he evokes memories of family, explores and expands the limits of the actor’s craft, and masterfully conjures a cast of indelible characters from classic short stories by Ring Lardner and P. G. Wodehouse.

Angels in America” (opening March 25; closing June
See full article at Gold Derby »
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