A coffin-dragging gunslinger and a half-breed prostitute become embroiled in a bitter feud between a Klan of Southern racists and a band of Mexican Revolutionaries.

Director:

Sergio Corbucci

Writers:

Sergio Corbucci (story), Bruno Corbucci (story) | 5 more credits »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Franco Nero ... Django
José Bódalo ... Gen. Hugo Rodriguez (as José Bodalo)
Loredana Nusciak ... Maria
Ángel Álvarez ... Nathaniel the Bartender (as Angel Alvarez)
Gino Pernice ... Brother Jonathan (as Jimmy Douglas)
Simón Arriaga Simón Arriaga ... Miguel (as Simon Arriaga)
Giovanni Ivan Scratuglia Giovanni Ivan Scratuglia ... Klan Member (as Ivan Scratuglia)
Remo De Angelis ... Ricardo (as Erik Schippers)
Rafael Albaicín Rafael Albaicín ... Member of Hugo's Gang (as Raphael Albaicin)
José Canalejas ... Member of Hugo's Gang (as José Canalecas)
Eduardo Fajardo ... Major Jackson
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Storyline

Squelching across a God-forsaken ghost town near the US/Mexican border, always dragging a heavy coffin, blue-eyed Django, a drifting, mud-spattered, former Union soldier, saves runaway María from certain death. But, the wooden container with the mysterious content has already caught the attention of the racist ex-Confederate officer, Major Jackson, and his gang of white supremacists, and before long, things get nasty. Now, the guns have the final say, and as if that weren't enough, Jackson's sworn enemy, General Hugo Rodríguez, and his feared revolutionaries, enter the picture, wanting to have a piece of the action. Can Django, the taciturn stranger with the lighting-fast right hand, take on two armies of murderous henchmen, and live to tell the tale? Written by Nick Riganas

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

He killed for gold... He killed for his woman... He killed for himself! See more »

Genres:

Action | Western

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Franco Nero was just 25 years old when he appeared in this film. Make-up was used to make him appear older. See more »

Goofs

Promotional materials for Blue Underground's releases of the film proclaim that the Italian version uses Franco Nero's voice for the character of Django. This is incorrect--Nero was, in fact, dubbed by actor/voice actor Nando Gazzolo. See more »

Quotes

Django: You can clean up the mess, now. But don't touch my coffin.
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Alternate Versions

The USA DVD has both the original version, spoken in Italian, and a dubbed English version. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Once Upon a Time... In Hollywood (2019) See more »

Soundtracks

Django (theme)
Lyrics by Franco Migliacci (as Migliacci) and Robert Mellin (uncredited)
Composed by Luis Bacalov (as Enriquez)
Conducted by Bruno Nicolai (uncredited)
Performed by Rocky Roberts
Published by General Music [it]
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User Reviews

 
S10 Reviews: Django (1966)
14 August 2005 | by suspiria10See all my reviews

Django (Franco Nero – The Fifth Cord, Hitch-Hike) is a gristled man-of-action who strolls the desert dragging his coffin of hell behind him. Django sets up shop one day at the local whorehouse of a veritable ghost town set up between the two warring factions of Major Jackson (Eduardo Fajardo – Nightmare City, Oasis of the Zombies) with his red hooded militia and General Hugo (José Bódalo – Companeros) with his Mexican ex-patriots. Django's no nonsense style quickly puts him smack in the middle of the fun as secrets are revealed and sides are played against each other.

Sergio Corbucci (Super Fuzz) directs this classic Italian spaghetti western. The script (while being pretty typical of the genre) manages to make Django a classic antihero thanks for the most part to Franco Nero's portrayal. The script's lack of originality doesn't stop it from having some clever set-pieces, nasty violence and even a bit of dark humor (some of my favorite sequences: the clearing of the whorehouse "Don't Touch my coffin", the "ear" scene and the Mexican skeet shoot). The music is wonderful (topped of by a fun theme song sung by someone trying to channel Elvis). The cast of Italian regulars nail their parts with mucho gusto. Any fan of violent westerns Italiano-style should belly up to the bar and give Django's coffin of wonders a watch. But don't mess with it


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Details

Country:

Italy | Spain

Language:

Italian

Release Date:

December 1966 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Jango See more »

Filming Locations:

Elios Film, Rome, Lazio, Italy See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$6,150, 23 December 2012

Gross USA:

$25,916

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$25,916
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (censored) | (censored)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor) (uncredited)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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