6.1/10
2,900
54 user 35 critic

Daleks' Invasion Earth 2150 A.D. (1966)

Not Rated | | Family, Sci-Fi | 5 August 1966 (UK)
The Daleks' fiendish plot in 2150 against Earth and its people is foiled when Dr. Who and friends arrive from the 20th century and figure it out.

Director:

Gordon Flemyng

Writers:

Terry Nation (from the B.B.C. television serial), Milton Subotsky (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Peter Cushing ... Dr. Who
Bernard Cribbins ... Tom Campbell
Ray Brooks ... David
Andrew Keir ... Wyler
Roberta Tovey ... Susan
Jill Curzon Jill Curzon ... Louise
Roger Avon Roger Avon ... Wells
Geoffrey Cheshire Geoffrey Cheshire ... Roboman
Keith Marsh Keith Marsh ... Conway
Philip Madoc ... Brockley
Steve Peters Steve Peters ... Leader Roboman
Eddie Powell ... Thompson
Godfrey Quigley ... Dortmun
Peter Reynolds ... Man on Bicycle
Bernard Spear Bernard Spear ... Man with Carrier bag
Edit

Storyline

Based on a story from the BBC TV serial "Doctor Who". Dr. Who and his companions arrive on Earth in the year 2150 AD, only to discover that the planet has been invaded and its population enslaved by the dreaded Daleks. The time travellers assist human resistance groups to foil the Daleks' plan to mine the Earth's core. Written by Alexander Lum <aj_lum@postoffice.utas.edu.au>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

bobby | police | policeman | fuzz | bacon | See All (273) »

Taglines:

Who were these demons from another world ??

Genres:

Family | Sci-Fi

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

5 August 1966 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

Daleks Invade Earth 2150 A.D. See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

£286,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Colour by) (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

This film was part-financed by the Quaker Oats Company, then-makers of the "Sugar Puffs" cereal, in return for an exclusive merchandising deal. Quaker combined with the film team in a £50,000 campaign which included 3½ million boxes of "Sugar Puffs" advertising the film, and a competition to win toy Louis Marx Daleks or the top prize, a full-size Dalek prop. Several posters for "Sugar Puffs" cereal are visible during the movie, an early (for a British film) example of product placement. Two special screenings for grocery traders were also arranged via the deal with executive producer Joe Vegoda. See more »

Goofs

When the van rams through the ranks of blue/silver Daleks in the street, some of those knocked flying and destroyed are clearly seen to be completely empty casings. See more »

Quotes

[repeated line]
Daleks: Exterminate!
See more »

Alternate Versions

Some versions of the film open with the credits sequence before switching to Tom's night-time street patrol. The original version opens with the raid, then the titles, then Tom's awakening in TARDIS. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Tomorrow's Times: The First Doctor (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

Toccata and Fugue in D Minor, BWV 565
(uncredited)
Composed by Johann Sebastian Bach
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Extermination is not an Option
3 September 2005 | by BogmeisterSee all my reviews

When I first saw this on TV as a kid, I was really taken with the fanciful far-out concepts of a conquered Earth. For a 12 year-old boy into sci-fi, this was and is the ultimate escapist fare. I had no knowledge of the British TV series at the time so my intro to Dr.Who was Peter Cushing (playing older than he is), the movie version of the old-time traditional Doctor. I probably saw this film before the previous one "Dr. Who and the Daleks" as I was puzzled by the Doctor's recognition of his old foes, the unforgettable Daleks. Yes, who can forget those frog-like voices, warped by metallics, usually screaming for the death of humans. The British cast is really keen, especially Cribbins as an out-of-place copper and Andrew Keir as a hobbled resistance fighter. They bring a curious reality to the fantastic setting.

The picture has a decidedly British flavor and, of course, is filmed in the British countryside. Though I didn't reason this out at the time when I was a kid, it had an obviously different taste to it; I was mostly familiar with U.S. low budget sci-fi pics of the '50s and '60s at the time. The scope of the picture seemed really huge back then: London in a destroyed state, humanity decimated. There was that really cool flying saucer, looking fully functional and detailed. And there were the creepy Robo-men, in their slick black bodysuits and far-out helmets, like some futuristic Nazis or space zombies. All of this stuff really just took me over and I couldn't wait for the next time the local TV channels would run it again (not very often, as it happened). Some years later, I realized the title, 2150 AD, sounded cool, but the invasion by the Daleks must have occurred only a few years before the events of this movie, and the dilapidated buildings all looked like they'd been wrecked in the sixties. Ah, no matter. Many years later, I got the DVD and the thrill, tho muted by the long passage of experience and adulthood, is still there. They really knew how to make 'em back then.


33 of 38 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 54 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Trending Movies With Prime Video

Enjoy a night in with these popular movies available to stream now with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed