6.1/10
2,874
54 user 37 critic

Daleks' Invasion Earth 2150 A.D. (1966)

Not Rated | | Family, Sci-Fi | 5 August 1966 (UK)
The Daleks' fiendish plot in 2150 against Earth and its people is foiled when Dr. Who and friends arrive from the 20th century and figure it out.

Director:

Gordon Flemyng

Writers:

Terry Nation (from the B.B.C. television serial), Milton Subotsky (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Peter Cushing ... Dr. Who
Bernard Cribbins ... Tom Campbell
Ray Brooks ... David
Andrew Keir ... Wyler
Roberta Tovey ... Susan
Jill Curzon Jill Curzon ... Louise
Roger Avon Roger Avon ... Wells
Geoffrey Cheshire Geoffrey Cheshire ... Roboman
Keith Marsh Keith Marsh ... Conway
Philip Madoc ... Brockley
Steve Peters Steve Peters ... Leader Roboman
Eddie Powell ... Thompson
Godfrey Quigley ... Dortmun
Peter Reynolds ... Man on Bicycle
Bernard Spear Bernard Spear ... Man with Carrier bag
Edit

Storyline

Based on a story from the BBC TV serial "Doctor Who". Dr. Who and his companions arrive on Earth in the year 2150 AD, only to discover that the planet has been invaded and its population enslaved by the dreaded Daleks. The time travellers assist human resistance groups to foil the Daleks' plan to mine the Earth's core. Written by Alexander Lum <aj_lum@postoffice.utas.edu.au>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

bobby | police | policeman | fuzz | bacon | See All (282) »

Taglines:

Who were these demons from another world ??

Genres:

Family | Sci-Fi

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

5 August 1966 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

Daleks Invade Earth 2150 A.D. See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

£286,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Colour by) (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Although Milton Subotsky reported some slight misgivings over the film, believing the public's desire to see the Daleks in colour was now sated, he would come to view this as the better of the two films, attributing much of their success to art director Bill Constable. See more »

Goofs

After the saucer attack, there's a long-shot of the wrecked area outside and Tom can be seen creeping down the ramp to hide himself behind a supporting strut. The shot changes to the craft interior, but now Tom is back at the top of the ramp and repeats his movements to the same strut he's previously flattened himself behind. See more »

Quotes

Dr. Who: Your bomb is designed to slide down this shaft, strike a fracture in the Earth's inner surface, and so release the magnetic core of our planet. But the fracture is near the meeting point of the magnetic influence of the North and South poles. One mistake, one deviation in the aiming of your bomb and enough magnetic energy will be released to destroy you.
Dalek: There will be no mistake! These prisoners are to be exterminated!
Dr. Who: One moment. You must listen to me. If you spare us, I can help you. I can ...
[...]
See more »

Alternate Versions

Despite even being included in the original 1966 theatrical trailer, some prints now excise the five shots of a Roboman lassoing a rebel and David's knifing of a Roboman during the saucer attack. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Doctor Who Confidential: War Games (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

Toccata and Fugue in D Minor, BWV 565
(uncredited)
Composed by Johann Sebastian Bach
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
"Detective Inspector Campbell – OBE!"
28 May 2000 | by The_Movie_CatSee all my reviews

The On Her Majesty's Secret Service of the Doctor Who world, the two Peter Cushing-Dalek films have seen occasional reappraisal that labels them as "coolly kitsch" or "lovably camp". In reality, of course, they're complete pants.

The Doctor Who TV series actually had a considerable integrity, despite being made on a budget of 50p and never managing to shake off the "Kid's Telly" tag. Here Cushing plays the Doctor of the title, his surname actually becoming "Who". The Tardis, his sophisticated space-time machine, is now "Tardis", a naff-looking thing with a Yale lock on the door. Around the time this was made a "Carry On" actor would do his only television work in the Doctor Who series – Peter Butterworth as the Meddling Monk. For the film we got Bernard Cribbins as P.C. Tom Campbell, a similar character to the one that married the Doctor's granddaughter on TV. Though as the film Susan is only ten that would be inappropriate here.

Both films (the other – Doctor Who and the Daleks, Cushing joined by Roy Castle) were based directly on actual TV stories, the novelty being they were in colour. By the time the second came around the novelty was over and it didn't do the business of the first, despite being someway the better film. Perhaps this is because the original serial – The Dalek Invasion of Earth – was an attempt to mount a film's epic scale on a TV budget. To this end it transfers better to the medium, and its setting (future Earth as opposed to the first film's alien planet Skaro) is more accessible to audiences.

The big failure is, of course, send-up. Some of the series' b-movie concepts (mutated nuclear war victims get robot-armoured shells and invade Earth to steal its core) are ludicrous, but played straight can be rewarding. The films make a mockery of the whole concept, showing a total lack of respect for their source material. My advice is: if you don't like 'em, don't make 'em. Bearing in mind the Daleks were hot merchandise properties at the time, this is a cynical cash-in on the nation's youth. There's even a shameless product placement for Sugar Puff Cereals.

All involved are capable of better. Peter Cushing, respected in adult horror films, here opts for a no-effort parody of TV Doctor William Hartnell's performance. There is no trace of depth or consideration for the part he has chosen. Full credit does go to Ray Brooks, Andrew Keir and Philip Madoc for at least trying to take it seriously. Madoc was rewarded with four seperate roles in the television series, most notably as mad scientist Solon (1976) and The War Lord (1969). On the plus side, direction in terms of camera angles is actually very, very good, but is offset by incidental music so loud and outdated that it works against the mood entirely. Think SF drama with Carry On music and you're almost there.

Bright and colourful, (including a funky red Dalek) the film certainly has visual appeal. But the Daleks' voices, their volume increased considerably, are extremely grating. They also lack their trademark warmth and charm, being little more than robots. Their weaponry was scheduled to be flame-throwers, but was disallowed due to the young audience. This is perhaps fortunate as their gas sprays aid the Nazi allegory. Best bit? The exploding shed.

Trite jazz, lame comic setpieces and binliner outfits, the film is on TV virtually every Bank Holiday in England. And you know the strangest part? As bad as it is, come next Bank Holiday I'll probably be tempted to see it again.


24 of 34 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 54 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Trending TV Series With Prime Video

Explore popular and recently added TV series available to stream now with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed