Blow-Up (1966) - News Poster

(1966)

News

The Best of Movie Poster of the Day: Part 18

  • MUBI
Above: 1986 Japanese poster for She’s Gotta Have It (Spike Lee, USA, 1986).In the ten months since I last did a round-up of the most popular posters on Movie Poster of the Day, two things have happened. I’ve slacked off a bit: after running the site since November 2011 and posting one poster every single day for years, in the past year I’ve let my self-appointed task slide a little and have been posting more sporadically. And at the same time it seems that Tumblr is starting to atrophy. At its height my site had over 300,000 followers—it still does officially, but I would guess that a large percentage of those people are no longer still on Tumblr or rarely check their feed. I’m often asked why I don’t up sticks and move to Instagram instead, but while I love Instagram for personal stuff, Tumblr is still
See full article at MUBI »

Songs For Screens: Active Child Offers Woke Spiritualism; Sonos Hosts A Deee-Lite-ful Dance Party

Songs For Screens: Active Child Offers Woke Spiritualism; Sonos Hosts A Deee-Lite-ful Dance Party
“Songs for Screens” (formerly known as “Synch This”) is a Variety column written by Andrew Hampp, a VP at New York-based music sponsorship and experiential agency Mac Presents and former branding correspondent for Billboard. Each week, the column will highlight noteworthy use of music in advertising and marketing campaigns, as well as new and catalog songs that we deem ripe for synch use.

Remember slow news days? Me neither. Where the latest news cycles have become relentlessly negative as the world does some serious soul-searching, pop music has become either deliberately escapist (witness Ed Sheeran’s “Shape of You,” the entirety of Taylor Swift’s “Reputation”), innocuous (the back-to-back Hot 100 No. 1s of Cardi B and Post Malone) or downright nihilistic (hardcore rap).

As ad agencies and TV showrunners alike wrestle with how to incorporate the current political climate into their latest commercials and prime-time hits (some more successfully than others), a new niche is being carved
See full article at Variety - Film News »

AC/DC Guitarist Malcolm Young Passes Away at 64

AC/DC Guitarist Malcolm Young Passes Away at 64
For those about to rock, we salute you. Malcolm Young, founding member of AC/DC and brother to lead guitarist Angus Young, has passed away at the age of 64. Malcolm suffered through dementia and cancer for the last years of his life and has not toured or recorded with the band since 2008's Black Ice. Malcolm Young was the band's rhythm guitar player and is responsible for many of AC/DC's best-known songs that have topped the charts as well as helped launch movies into the top of the box office with his contributions to soundtracks.

In a statement on the Malcolm Young's Facebook, his family said, "Renowned for his musical prowess, Malcolm was a songwriter, guitarist, performer, producer and visionary who inspired many." While the statement is accurate, it also underscores just how amazing Malcolm Young really was. Arnold Schwarzenegger's The Last Action Hero was a box office bomb,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Exclusive Portrait, Audio: Vanessa Redgrave at the 53rd Chicago International Film Festival

Chicago – The luminous and legendary movie star Vanessa Redgrave was given a tribute at the 53rd Chicago International Film Festival on October 16th, 2017. The Oscar-winning actress also directed a documentary that she brought to the festival, an overview of the world’s refugee crisis entitled “Sea Sorrow.” HollywoodChicago.com talked to Redgrave, and photographer Joe Arce took the Exclusive Portrait.

Vanessa Redgrave at the 53rd Chicago International Film Festival

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

Vanessa Redgrave was born into a famous British family of actors, daughter of Sir Michael Redgrave. She rose to prominence in 1961, portraying Rosalind in “As You Like It” for the Royal Shakespeare Company, and has since performed in over 35 stage productions on London’s West End and Broadway, winning a Tony in 2003 for “A Long Day’s Journey into Night.” Her film career is equally eminent, as she has been nominated six times for Academy Awards,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

The 2017 Muriels Hall Of Fame Inductees

The history of the Muriel Awards stretches aaaalllll the way back to 2006, which means that this coming season will be a special anniversary, marking 10 years of observing the annual quality and achievement of the year in film. (If you don’t know about the Muriels, you can check up on that history here.) The voting group, of which I am a proud member, having participated since Year One, has also made its personal nod to film history by always having incorporated 10, 25 and 50-year anniversary awards, saluting what is agreed upon by ballot to be the best films from those anniversaries during each annual voting process.

But more recently, in 2013, Muriels founders Paul Clark and Steven Carlson decided to expand the Muriels purview and further acknowledge the great achievements in international film by instituting The Muriels Hall of Fame. Each year a new group of films of varying number would be voted upon and,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

NYC Weekend Watch: 1977, Jonathan Demme, ‘2001’ on 70mm, ‘After Hours’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

“’77” celebrates a seminal cinematic year in proper fashion, with a loaded first weekend that includes Friedkin, Cronenberg, Argento, Herzog and more.

Bam

A career-encompassing Jonathan Demme retrospective is now underway.

Concert films continue.

Metrograph

Scorsese, Mann, Wiseman and more in “Films that Inspired Good Time.”

Saul BassPhase IV and Altman’s Popeye have screenings,
See full article at The Film Stage »

NYC Weekend Watch: Carlo Di Palma, ‘Blow Up,’ ‘World on a Wire’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind tha

Film Society of Lincoln Center

The great Carlo Di Palma shot some of the finest films ever made, so he gets a series. Featuring Antonioni, Allen, Bertolucci, and more.

Metrograph

Though well past sold-out, the uncut print of Suspiria plays this weekend, as does 3 Women.

The top 10 of director Sergei Loznitsa screens.

Film Forum

Blow Up has been restored and begins screening.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Movie Poster of the Week: Michelangelo Antonioni’s "Blow-Up"

Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow-Up—which opens today in a new restoration at New York’s Film Forum—is a film about images, photographs especially (a film whose obsession with film grain makes a hi-def digital restoration seem almost perverse). But if ever a film has been reduced to a single image in the public mind it is Antonioni’s mod masterpiece, whose shot of David Hemmings straddling super-model Veruschka at the climactic moment of an orgasmic photo shoot has become the movie’s money shot, endlessly parodied since. Veruschka (a.k.a. Countess Vera von Lehndorff-Steinort) appears for only five minutes at the beginning of the film but she, more than top-billed star Vanessa Redgrave, became the face, or rather the body, of Blow-Up.The shot was used for both the French grande (painted by Georges Kerfyser) and the Japanese poster, above, as well as for a wonderful series of green,
See full article at MUBI »

"Red Desert" & "Husbands and Wives": Two Visions from Carlo Di Palma

Carlo Di Palma and Woody AllenThe only thing more consistent than the quality of Carlo Di Palma’s cinematography is the routine variance of his work. Though his most prominent titles were primarily those done in collaboration with two key directors—Michelangelo Antonioni and Woody Allen—what he demonstrated over the course of his career, in these films and dozens more, revealed a remarkable exhibition of visual range. His decades-spanning career produced a gallery of fluctuating colors, lighting techniques, temperatures, movements, and tones. And more often than not, what he refined in this richly varying field proved to be a directly corresponding realization of profound psychological consequence.Born April 17, 1925 in Rome, the son of a camera repair man, Di Palma’s cinematic commencement went from focus operator on Neo-Realist essentials like Rome, Open City (1945) and Bicycle Thieves (1948) to serving various capacities on largely subpar Italian fare. A turning point came
See full article at MUBI »

Water and Sugar: Carlo Di Palma, The Colours of Life review – flat take on a vibrant career

The cinematographer for Antonioni and Woody Allen deserves better than this reverential profile

Here’s a choice. Either you spend 90 minutes watching people trying to find different ways to say that cinematographer Carlo Di Palma “sculpted with light”. Or, better, you seek out the work that is so temptingly trailed in this documentary, films such as Antonioni’s Red Desert and Blow-Up or Woody Allen’s Hannah and Her Sisters. This film by Fariborz Kamkari is well intentioned and reverential but it feels like a tombstone for the oeuvre of a man whose photography was vividly, mercurially alive.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Episode 183 – Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow-Up

This time on the podcast, Scott Nye, David Blakeslee, and Trevor Berrett discuss Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow-Up.

In 1966, Michelangelo Antonioni transplanted his existentialist ennui to the streets of swinging London for this international sensation, the Italian filmmaker’s first English-language feature. A countercultural masterpiece about the act of seeing and the art of image making, Blow-Up takes the form of a psychological mystery, starring David Hemmings as a fashion photographer who unknowingly captures a death on film after following two lovers in a park. Antonioni’s meticulous aesthetic control and intoxicating color palette breathe life into every frame, and the jazzy sounds of Herbie Hancock, a beautifully evasive performance by Vanessa Redgrave, and a cameo by the Yardbirds make the film a transporting time capsule from a bygone era. Blow-Up is a seductive immersion into creative passion, and a brilliant film by one of cinema’s greatest artists.

Subscribe to
See full article at CriterionCast »

Filmadrid & Mubi: The Video Essay—"Silencer"

The Video Essay is a joint project of Mubi and Filmadrid Festival Internacional de Cine. Film analysis and criticism found a completely new and innovative path with the arrival of the video essay, a relatively recent form that already has its own masters and is becoming increasingly popular. The limits of this discipline are constantly expanding; new essayists are finding innovative ways to study the history of cinema working with images. With this non-competitive section of the festival both Mubi and Filmadrid will offer the platform and visibility the video essay deserves. The seven selected works will be shown during the dates of Filmadrid (June 8 - 17, 2017) on Mubi’s cinema publication, the Notebook. Also there will be a free public screening of the selected works during the festival. The selection was made by the programmers of Mubi and Filmadrid.SilencerVideo essay by Tope OgundareA mash-up of Blow-Up and The Conversation,
See full article at MUBI »

This Gal Gadot Lip Syncing Video is Going to Blow up the Internet

The popularity of Wonder Woman cannot be overstated nor can the popularity of Gal Gadot. Whether she likes or not, Gadot is now officially one of the poster children for the empowerment of women. So far Gadot has been taking it all in stride and handling herself quite well in all of her appearances and interviews. My hope is that the popularity doesn’t go to her head and that she can maintain an even keel about all this. Also, I hope we get to see Gadot’s versatility in other films since Wonder Woman will obviously open up the door for

This Gal Gadot Lip Syncing Video is Going to Blow up the Internet
See full article at TVovermind.com »

20 Conspiracy Theory Movies That Came After the Assassination of JFK (Photos)

  • The Wrap
20 Conspiracy Theory Movies That Came After the Assassination of JFK (Photos)
The belief that a conspiracy of sinister forces was behind the assassination of President John F. still provides the basis for many Hollywood films. JFK would have been 100 today, and while these films are not JFK conspiracy theory films, they do reflect viewers’ more suspicious attitudes since his assassination. Blow-Up (1966) This Michelangelo Antonioni film starred David Hemmings as a photographer who discovers the clues to a potential murder in the photos he took of a beautiful woman. Soylent Green (1973) In a dystopian future, Charlton Heston discovers that the new and vital food supply from the government isn’t what they claim.
See full article at The Wrap »

Vanessa Redgrave: ‘Democracy is at stake. That’s why I’m voting Labour’

The actor and leftwing activist is at Cannes to talk about her directorial debut, a documentary attacking the handling of the refugee crisis – and it takes a little jousting for her to delve into her rich past…

It’s the 70th edition of the Cannes film festival; a birthday to celebrate, an excuse to look back. The list of past Palme d’Or winners scrolls across the screen ahead of the evening premiere. The whole town is studded with pictures from yesteryear. There’s Brigitte Bardot posing on the beach; Godard and Truffaut rallying the masses; Blow Up-era Vanessa Redgrave in a striped mini-dress, the epitome of swinging 60s London. “Oh yeah, very glamorous,” the actor recalls. “I came with Michelangelo Antonioni and Monica Vitti, so I felt I was really in with the cool crowd. Except that we didn’t call it cool in those days. I’m
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

New to Streaming: ‘Logan,’ ‘Good Morning,’ ‘The Lego Batman Movie,’ ‘The Survivalist,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Before I Fall (Ry Russo-Young)

Harold Ramis certainly didn’t invent it, but his Groundhog Day made the narrative loop device a mainstream mainstay, lovingly aped in everything from Source Code to Edge of Tomorrow to 50 First Dates. In Before I Fall, the loop treatment is utilized rather intelligently by director Ry Russo-Young, from Maria Maggenti screenplay adapted from Lauren Oliver‘s novel. – Dan M. (full review)

Where to Stream: Amazon,
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Best Movies to Ever Win Cannes’ Palme d’Or — IndieWire Critic Survey

The Best Movies to Ever Win Cannes’ Palme d’Or  — IndieWire Critic Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of the Cannes Film Festival, the 70th edition of which starts this week, what is the best film to ever win the coveted Palme d’Or?

For a complete list of Palme d’Or winners, click here.

Erin Whitney (@Cinemabite), ScreenCrush

This question is impossible because I clearly haven’t seen all 40 Palme d’Or winners (it’s on my to do list, I swear). But I could easily say “Apocalypse Now,” “Paris, Texas,” “Taxi Driver,” “Amour,” or even “Pulp Fiction.” But since this is a personal question, I have to say “The Tree of Life.” No film has moved me
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes adds restored 'Bugsy Malone', 'Saturday Night Fever'

  • ScreenDaily
Cannes adds restored 'Bugsy Malone', 'Saturday Night Fever'
Exclusive: Cannes Classics additions also include Michael Bay’s Bad Boys.

Cannes Classics is understood to have added three movies to its lineup in the shape of Bugsy Malone, Saturday Night Fever and Bad Boys.

Director Alan Parker has been closely involved in the restoration of his 1976 classic Bugsy Malone, which is due to get a Cinéma de la Plage (beach screening) on Friday May 19th.

The director’s cut of John Travolta dance drama Saturday Night Fever, which will celebrate its 40th anniversary this year with a Us re-release, is slated for a Cinéma de la Plage on Saturday 20th May.

The cut will include three scenes not in the original release.

Michael Bay’s 1995 action-comedy Bad Boys will also get a beach screening on Monday 22 May. The film’s star Will Smith is on the festival jury this year.

The trio are among the Classics lineup restored by distributor Park Circus, which has also
See full article at ScreenDaily »

New to Streaming: ‘Things to Come,’ Jacques Rivette, ‘I Am Not Your Negro,’ ‘Blow Out,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Blow Out (Brian De Palma)

In a career fixated on the machinations of filmmaking presented through both a carnal and political eye, Brian De Palma’s fascinations converged idyllically with Blow Out. In his ode to the conceit of Blow UpMichelangelo Antonioni’s deeply influential English-language debut, released 15 years prior — as well as the aural intrigue of Francis Ford Coppola’s The Conversation, De Palma constructs a conspiracy
See full article at The Film Stage »

Syfy’s grindhouse series Blood Drive gets a trailer and promo

A trailer, promo and banner have arrived online for Syfy’s upcoming grindhouse series Blood Drive ahead of its premiere next the month. The series will consist of 13 episodes and features a cast that includes Alan Ritchson, Thomas Dominique, Christina Ochoa, Marama Corlett, and Colin Cunningham; check them out below…

Los Angeles in the near future: where water is a scarce as oil, gas costs $60 per gallon, and climate change keeps the temperature at a cool 115 in the shade. It’s a place where no one can walk down the street without protection, where crime is so rampant that only the worst violence is punished, and where Arthur Bailey — the city’s last good cop — runs afoul of the dirtiest and meanest underground car rally in the world, Blood Drive. The master of ceremonies is a vaudevillian nightmare, The drivers are homicidal deviants, and the cars run on human blood.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites