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Andrei Rublev (1966)

Andrey Rublev (original title)
Trailer
1:39 | Trailer
The life, times and afflictions of the fifteenth-century Russian iconographer St. Andrei Rublev.

Director:

Andrei Tarkovsky (as Andrey Tarkovskiy)

Writers:

Andrey Konchalovskiy (as Andrey Mikhalkov-Konchalovskiy), Andrei Tarkovsky (as Andrey Tarkovskiy)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Anatoliy Solonitsyn ... Andrey Rublev
Ivan Lapikov ... Kirill
Nikolay Grinko ... Daniil Chyornyy
Nikolay Sergeev ... Feofan Grek
Irina Tarkovskaya ... Durochka (as Irma Raush)
Nikolay Burlyaev ... Boriska
Yuriy Nazarov ... Velikiy knyaz, Malyy knyaz
Yuriy Nikulin ... Patrikey, monakh (as Yu. Nikulin)
Rolan Bykov ... Skomorokh (as R. Bykov)
Nikolay Grabbe ... Stepan, sotnik Velikogo knyazya (as N. Grabbe)
Mikhail Kononov ... Foma, monakh (as M. Kononov)
Stepan Krylov ... Starshiy liteyshchik (as S. Krylov)
Bolot Beyshenaliev ... Tatarskiy khan (as B. Beyshenaliev)
B. Matysik B. Matysik ... Pyotr
Anatoliy Obukhov ... Aleksey, monakh (as A. Obukhov)
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Storyline

Andreiv Rublev charts the life of the great icon painter through a turbulent period of 15th Century Russian history, a period marked by endless fighting between rival Princes and by Tatar invasions. Written by L.H. Wong <as9401k56@ntuvax.ntu.ac.sg>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Vasiliy Livanov claims to be the one who suggested the idea for the film. He also wanted to play the lead, but director Andrei Tarkovsky wanted to cast the previously unknown actor Anatoliy Solonitsyn. See more »

Goofs

The smoothly-cut logs that feature many times in the early scenes are clearly cut with machinery not available in the early fifteenth century. See more »

Quotes

Kirill: [admiring one of Feofan's icon paintings] As Epiphanius said in "The Life of Saint Sergeius," "Simplicity, without gaudiness." That is what this is. It's sacred... Simplicity, without gaudiness - you can't say it better.
Feofan Grek: I see you are a wise man.
Kirill: If so, is that a good thing? If one is ignorant, isn't it better to be guided by one's heart?
Feofan Grek: In much wisdom there is much grief. And he who increases knowledge increases sorrow.
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Alternate Versions

When released in the UK, the sight of a horse falling off a staircase was cut from this title. See more »

User Reviews

 
The gospel according to Andrei Rublev
18 December 2004 | by desh79See all my reviews

As someone who has seen this movie roughly five times and regards it as the greatest masterpiece in the history of cinema, I find it difficult to fathom how anyone can think that Andrei Rublev is "slow" or "boring". It is true that it's slow-paced, and perhaps too demanding in its unconventional structure of narrative, but I would prefer this to anything commercial cinema releases in its quest to appeal to as broad a market a possible. In other words, given the choice between a film that treats its audience with respect and gives you enough credit to assume you are willing to sit through roughly three hours of lengthy dialogue and long takes, not to mention some of the most mesmerisingly beautiful visuals ever seen on screen; and one which treats its audience like a demographic that can be appealed to like consumers, not individuals with their own dreams, fears, hopes and aspirations, I know which type of cinema truly bores me.

It is often the case that art serves as a mechanism used to comment on social- or individuals ills; rarely however, if at all, does it reflect on itself and its own function to humanity. This is what makes Andrei Rublev a unique and important film, since it addresses the role of the artist in the world. Any questions regarding historical accuracy (or rather lack thereof) towards Rublev's personal life are slightly pointless, since the character is merely used as a vehicle to drive the thematic elements of the narrative. That's not to say that Rublev here is an empty shell, it's simply that Tarkovsky used him as a means to impose his personal views on the subject. Why create art? Does being an artist mean expressing love for humanity? If so, why should one express love for something which seems to hate itself? These are just a few of the questions which arise from viewing this film (and some of which Rublev seems to ask himself, illustrated by at first a naive belief in the good in all humanity, then disillusion, and eventually a rekindling of faith), but it makes the montage of Rublev's work at the end of the film all the more effective, since it creates an understanding of the pain and anguish that lie behind these images.

To regard Andrei Rublev as one movie (assuming that the general definition of a movie is simply a big chunk of storyline) would do some injustice to the brilliantly unorthodox nature of its narrative, in that it's a collection of eight mini-story lines, all of which can be viewed as individual pieces, and three of which could easily pass as masterpieces in their own right. My personal favourite is the third one; Rublev's dialogue with Theophanes The Greek over the self-destructive nature of humanity is, to me at least, one of the most moving moments on film (this is possibly due to Theophanes voicing an opinion I personally arrived at some time before initially watching this film - and one I unfortunately happen to agree with).

Like most of Tarkovsky's movies, Andrei Rublev demands repeated viewings so the film can be absorbed and understood in full. But by doing so you'll begin to realise that this is possibly the most rewarding of all cinematic works, and consequently the most wonderful. The best film ever made? I certainly think so.


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Details

Country:

Soviet Union

Language:

Russian | Italian | Tatar

Release Date:

October 1973 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Andrei Rublev See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

RUR1,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$11,537, 15 September 2002

Gross USA:

$124,189

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$145,491
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(re-edited) | (re-edited) | (2004 re-release) | (original length) | (UK) | (Blu-ray)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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