7.9/10
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50 user 25 critic

Mission: Impossible 

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0:32 | Trailer
An elite covert operations unit carries out highly sensitive missions subject to official denial in the event of failure, death or capture.

Creator:

Bruce Geller
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Popularity
906

Episodes

Seasons


Years



7   6   5   4   3   2   1  
1973   1972   1971   1970   1969   1968   … See all »
Won 3 Golden Globes. Another 16 wins & 39 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
Greg Morris ...  Barney Collier 171 episodes, 1966-1973
Peter Lupus ...  Willy Armitage 161 episodes, 1966-1973
Peter Graves ...  James Phelps / ... 143 episodes, 1967-1973
Barbara Bain ...  Cinnamon Carter 78 episodes, 1966-1969
Martin Landau ...  Rollin Hand / ... 76 episodes, 1966-1969
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Storyline

Jim Phelps (Peter Graves) is the head of a super-secret government agency, the I.M.F. (Impossible Missions Force), and is often given secret anonymous covert missions to attempt. Quite often, they are unmasking criminals or rescuing hostages. He picks his team depending on which tasks need to be done. One thing is vital on an Impossible Mission: the mission must be carried out in entire secrecy, often relying on high-tech equipment and elaborate deceptions. Written by Murray Chapman <muzzle@cs.uq.oz.au>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The IMF back in action. With Peter Graves and Leonard Nimoy again handling the team of derring-doers of the impossible (season 5) See more »


Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Season one, episode twenty-three, "Action!", season two, episode twenty-one, "The Town", and season seven, episode eleven, "Kidnap" are the only ones in which the head of the I.M.F. team did not receive instructions. In "Action!", Cinnamon Carter (Barbara Bain) received the instructions instead. It's also the only episode in the first season in which Daniel Briggs (Steven Hill) did not appear. In "The Town", Jim Phelps (Peter Graves) was on vacation when he uncovered a town of assassins who immobilize and try to kill him. In "Kidnap", Phelps was kidnapped and the information for his release was given to Barney Collier (Greg Morris). In season five, episode four, "Homecoming", Jim arrived in his hometown to discover someone was killing the young women. There are only six episodes that are not "true missions". They include two of the above ("Homecoming" and "Kidnap") as well as season four, episode twenty-four, "Death Squad", where Barney was charged with murder; season two, episode nineteen, "The Condemned", where Phelps had to help a friend who had been charged with murder; and season one, episode eight, "The Ransom", where Briggs had to save a friend's kidnapped daughter. In season five, episode fifteen, "Cat's Paw", Barney's brother was murdered, and the team helped him bring those responsible to justice. See more »

Goofs

In multiple cases, Barney acts as a character such as a guard or an electrical worker in Eastern Europe. Since Eastern Europe had virtually no immigration from Africa during the 1960s, Barney's obvious African heritage would arouse immediate and very consequential suspicion. See more »

Quotes

[repeated line]
Voice on Tape: As always, should you or any of your IM force be caught or killed, the Secretary will disavow any knowledge of your actions. Good luck, Jim. This tape will self-destruct in five seconds.
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Crazy Credits

Episode titles were not shown on-screen. Although this became commonplace with dramatic series in the late 1980s, it was unusual in the 1960s for a one-hour action series to not have episode titles. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Simpsons: Homer the Heretic (1992) See more »

User Reviews

Rarely equalled, never surpassed
11 January 2004 | by hgallonSee all my reviews

One of my fondest memories of TV viewing in the late 60's and 70's, was the weekly hour of tension which Mission Impossible provided. There was the initial bewilderment of trying to work out how on earth the brief flashes of peculiar devices and tension-ridden confrontations could possibly be woven into a coherent plot. Next, there were the wonderfully mundane locations in which Peter Graves would retrieve the briefing materials and the tape which invariably dissolved in a cloud of smoke.

After all the introduction, the remaining fifty minutes was sometimes an anti-climax. More often, it was very satisfying to see the initial vignettes fitted jigsaw-pattern into the plot. Perhaps towards the very end of the series, the plots became a little stilted or physically impossible; but invariably entertaining.

Like most fans of the original series, I found the over-hyped film of the same name to be an facile and shallow work with no redeeming features. I would die happy seeing a film in which Martin Landau, Peter Graves, Greg Morris et al. emerge creaking from retirement to save the day, and as they so often did, drive off leaving thwarted villains to turn on each other.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

17 September 1966 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Mission: Impossible See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(168 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

4:3
See full technical specs »

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