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Young Cassidy (1965)

Approved | | Biography, Drama | 22 April 1965 (Argentina)
Trailer
3:33 | Trailer
The misadventures of a young idealist man in Dublin, Ireland in the early twentieth century.

Directors:

Jack Cardiff, John Ford (uncredited)

Writers:

John Whiting (screenplay), Sean O'Casey (autobiography "Mirror in My House")
Reviews
Nominated for 2 BAFTA Film Awards. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Rod Taylor ... John Cassidy
Julie Christie ... Daisy Battles
Maggie Smith ... Nora
Michael Redgrave ... W.B. Yeats
Edith Evans ... Lady Gregory
Flora Robson ... Mrs. Cassidy
Jack MacGowran ... Archie
Siân Phillips ... Ella
T.P. McKenna ... Tom
Julie Ross Julie Ross ... Sara
Robin Sumner Robin Sumner ... Michael
Philip O'Flynn Philip O'Flynn ... Mick Mullen (as Phillip O'Flynn)
Pauline Delaney ... Bessie Ballynoy (as Pauline Delany)
Arthur O'Sullivan Arthur O'Sullivan ... Foreman
Joe Lynch Joe Lynch ... 1st Hurler
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Storyline

In Dublin circa 1911, John Cassidy (Rod Taylor), an impoverished idealist, whose ambitions are restricted by the demands of looking after his family, journeys through the social injustices of Dublin life, involving himself with the rowdy tramway-men strike, dawdling with prostitute Daisy Battles (Julie Christie), and seeking a better life. He falls in love with bookshop assistant Nora (Dame Maggie Smith) who encourages him toward a life of writing. Finding success at the Abbey Theatre, his unorthodox views estrange him from family, friends, and his own past. Written by alfiehitchie

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Cassidy loves life so much a lesser heart would burst See more »

Genres:

Biography | Drama

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

John Ford was keen on casting either Peter O'Toole or Richard Harris in the lead. Sean O' Casey, on whose early life this movie was based, suggested the less starry Donal Donnelly or Norman Rodway for the part. See more »

Goofs

The story is set around 1910. One hour into the story a horse and carriage pass by. A 1960s-era car is seen turning at an intersection where it just came from. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Foreman: [agitated with his overly vigorous workmanship] Cassidy! For the love-a God man, your enthusiasm will be the death of us all. Toss the dirt nice and easy where it's meant to go.
John Cassidy: Yes sir.
Foreman: What dya think you're doin' down there, reconstructin' the whole of Ireland? Come on outta there, come up.
[John reluctantly climbs out of the trench]
Foreman: Cassidy, ya be with us one day, and already ya nearly caused the most terrible slaughter among the men.
John Cassidy: Yes, I'll get the hang of it if I'm given the ...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

Billed as "A John Ford Film", although Jack Cardiff is credited as sole director. See more »

Connections

Featured in Sean O'Casey: The Spirit of Ireland (1965) See more »

User Reviews

 
Formidable individual performances, weak film
3 March 2003 | by JuguAbrahamSee all my reviews

I was most amused to see the credits start presenting a John Ford film and the credits ending with "directed by Jack Cardiff."

I believe John Ford was responsible for a few scenes in the film, including the scene where Rod Taylor (Sean O'Casey/Cassidy) enters the room where his mother (Dame Flora Robson) lies dead. This sequence is extraordinary--described and narrated by Taylor's monologue and actions. This does not stand up to the quality of the rest of the film, which is below average. Now Cardiff is a good cinematographer. He has to deal with a great cast assembled by Ford, who individually perform very well, and are captured well by Cardiff's visual eye but lack the vision of a great director to string the pearls together into a great necklace. The film's ending is amusing--a poor man turned rich man handing a crown to a vagrant who appreciates the worth of the money. What had the ending to do with what preceded it? If anything, the final scene is ambiguous and one begins to wonder whether the director was making a hero of Sean O'Casey or was he chastising him as are the film's oblique comments on Yeats living in sheltered house, policed by the British. The poor man turned into a rich and famous playwright is presented to us in fits and starts. The film did have a good intention but it lapses into mediocrity. Only two characters develop well--the mother (Robson) and Nora (Maggie Smith).

Julie Christie is mesmerising in any film but her character is never developed. Maggie Smith has charmed audiences over the years but this film is definitely one of her finest. Dames Robson and Evans are daunting thespians. Add to them Michael Redgrave. All great actors--including Aussie Rod Taylor. The film does not end with a bang but with a whimper.


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

22 April 1965 (Argentina) See more »

Also Known As:

Young Cassidy See more »

Filming Locations:

County Wicklow, Ireland See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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