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Young Cassidy (1965)

Approved | | Biography, Drama | 22 April 1965 (Argentina)
Trailer
3:33 | Trailer
The misadventures of a young idealist man in Dublin, Ireland in the early twentieth century.

Directors:

Jack Cardiff, John Ford (uncredited)

Writers:

John Whiting (screenplay), Sean O'Casey (autobiography "Mirror in My House")
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Nominated for 2 BAFTA Film Awards. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Rod Taylor ... John Cassidy
Julie Christie ... Daisy Battles
Maggie Smith ... Nora
Michael Redgrave ... W.B. Yeats
Edith Evans ... Lady Gregory
Flora Robson ... Mrs. Cassidy
Jack MacGowran ... Archie
Siân Phillips ... Ella
T.P. McKenna ... Tom
Julie Ross Julie Ross ... Sara
Robin Sumner Robin Sumner ... Michael
Philip O'Flynn Philip O'Flynn ... Mick Mullen (as Phillip O'Flynn)
Pauline Delaney ... Bessie Ballynoy (as Pauline Delany)
Arthur O'Sullivan Arthur O'Sullivan ... Foreman
Joe Lynch Joe Lynch ... 1st Hurler
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Storyline

In Dublin circa 1911, John Cassidy (Rod Taylor), an impoverished idealist, whose ambitions are restricted by the demands of looking after his family, journeys through the social injustices of Dublin life, involving himself with the rowdy tramway-men strike, dawdling with prostitute Daisy Battles (Julie Christie), and seeking a better life. He falls in love with bookshop assistant Nora (Dame Maggie Smith) who encourages him toward a life of writing. Finding success at the Abbey Theatre, his unorthodox views estrange him from family, friends, and his own past. Written by alfiehitchie

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

He's a brawling, sprawling giant - on the make for fame and fortune and then some! See more »

Genres:

Biography | Drama

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The character of "John Cassidy" is allegedly based on playwright Sean O'Casey (his name is an Anglicization of O'Casey's), but Rod Taylor, playing the part, bears no resemblance to the famous writer. The real O'Casey was a diminutive man with poor eyesight who always wore thick glasses and kept out of violent encounters. He was a working-class man of strong intellectual gifts and fierce political views, and in reality was, at the time of the events depicted, about fifteen or twenty years older than "Cassidy" is supposed to be. See more »

Goofs

The story is set around 1910. One hour into the story a horse and carriage pass by. A 1960s-era car is seen turning at an intersection where it just came from. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Foreman: [agitated with his overly vigorous workmanship] Cassidy! For the love-a God man, your enthusiasm will be the death of us all. Toss the dirt nice and easy where it's meant to go.
John Cassidy: Yes sir.
Foreman: What dya think you're doin' down there, reconstructin' the whole of Ireland? Come on outta there, come up.
[John reluctantly climbs out of the trench]
Foreman: Cassidy, ya be with us one day, and already ya nearly caused the most terrible slaughter among the men.
John Cassidy: Yes, I'll get the hang of it if I'm given the ...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

Billed as "A John Ford Film", although Jack Cardiff is credited as sole director. See more »

Connections

Referenced in MGM 40th Anniversary (1964) See more »

User Reviews

 
Good Biopic Of An Increasingly Neglected Writer
31 August 2008 | by cwarne_ukSee all my reviews

Sean O'Casey was born John Casey, so a film about his early life that calls him John Cassidy makes sense in a sort of way. The film is based on his autobiographies (there are 6 volumes I believe) which are apparently quite readable but not entirely trustworthy. As a committed socialist (even a communist) and protestant O'Casey was to find he had no place in the conservative, catholic Ireland of De Valera. This is the great central irony of the man's life (and of the history of Irish literature of the time), that one of the few great Irish writers to deal directly with the Troubles was eventually driven from the country - so much so that he spent the last 35 years of his life in England and never once went back home. The film "Young Cassidy" is a pretty decent attempt to capture the man and his oddities. Rod Taylor looks nothing like the man but gives an energetic, likable performance. Other performances are OK and it is always nice to see Michael Redgrave, here as Yeats (he looks as little like the real man as Taylor does). Started by John Ford this looks like one of his Irish pictures but thankfully never descends into the blarney that films such as "The Quiet Man" did (Jack Cardiff who directed most of the film deserves more credit than he is usually given for his role). Filmed in Dublin it has a very authentic look. The main problem is in toning down O'Casey and his politics, he was far more radical than he was portrayed here and also far more of an irritant (to whatever country he lived in). In summary a decent biopic, overlooked but worth watching by Ford fans or those interested in Ireland.


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

22 April 1965 (Argentina) See more »

Also Known As:

Young Cassidy See more »

Filming Locations:

County Wicklow, Ireland See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
See full technical specs »

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