An American POW leads a group of mainly British prisoners to escape from the Germans in WWII.

Director:

Mark Robson

Writers:

David Westheimer (novel), Wendell Mayes (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Frank Sinatra ... Col. Joseph L. Ryan
Trevor Howard ... Maj. Eric Fincham
Raffaella Carrà ... Gabriella (as Raffaella Carra)
Brad Dexter ... Sgt. Bostick
Sergio Fantoni ... Capt. Oriani
John Leyton ... Orde
Edward Mulhare ... Costanzo
Wolfgang Preiss ... Maj. Von Klemment
James Brolin ... Pvt. Ames
John Van Dreelen ... Col. Gortz (as John van Dreelen)
Adolfo Celi ... Battaglia
Vito Scotti ... Italian Train Engineer
Richard Bakalyan ... Cpl. Giannini
Michael Goodliffe ... Capt. Stein
Michael St. Clair Michael St. Clair ... Sgt. Dunbar
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Storyline

Ryan, an American POW, leads his fellow prisoners on a dangerous escape from the Germans in Italy. Having seemingly made errors of judgment, Ryan has to win the support of the mainly British soldiers he is commanding. Written by Rob Hartill

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Why did 600 Allied prisoners hate the man they called Von Ryan more than they hated Hitler? See more »

Genres:

Action | Adventure | War

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The leather jacket that Frank Sinatra wore in this movie was later worn by Bob Crane in Hogan's Heroes (1965). It was later worn by Greg Kinnear in Auto Focus (2002). See more »

Goofs

When Ryan's crashed airplane is burning, the bracing holding the burning aircraft in the inclined position is visible. See more »

Quotes

Sergeant Bostick: [referring to Fincham and the Britsh] It took 200 years to turn out these men, Sergeant. It took me 90 days.
Sergeant Bostick: They're nuts, sir.
Colonel Joseph L. Ryan: Maybe so, but it's their ball game.
Private Ames: And we're still shut out!
Corporal Giannini: We did that good with just a sergeant!
Private Ames: Now we got us a bird-colonel.
Colonel Joseph L. Ryan: A bird colonel outranks a bird brain... clear?
Corporal Giannini: [contemtuously after Ryan walks away] Bird is right... chicken!
Sergeant Bostick: OK, OK, now we know we're on our own.
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Crazy Credits

The film credits and all promotion publicity still say "A Cinemascope Picture", and Alfred Newman's "extended" 20th Century-Fox fanfare is still heard on the soundtrack as the picture begins, but most of the film was actually shot in Panavision, at Frank Sinatra's insistence. See more »

Alternate Versions

When originally released theatrically in the UK, the BBFC made cuts to secure a 'U' rating. All cuts were waived in 1988 when the film was granted a 'PG' certificate for home video. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Bob Newhart Show: Dr. Ryan's Express (1974) See more »

User Reviews

 
Adventure Thriller, Well-Made; Unusual Action Premise
13 July 2005 | by silverscreen888See all my reviews

This is a very logical and well-considered storyline developed from David Westheimer's WWWII thriller by Wendell Mayes and Joseph Landon The escape that ends this film, a trainborne flight across Italian lines toward Switzerland provides a vivid action climax when the train is attacked; it is a bit implausible only because of the length of time the train has to go on unstopped. The film begins its exciting adventure narrative with the arrival of "Von Ryan", then Ryan, among a group of busy British and American sorts trying to escape from a stalag run by a sadistic commandant. They are being punished, but will not give up their attempts. As the now-ranking senior officer, Ryan orders them to stop escaping, then betrays their tunnels to the enemy in return for decent conditions. He is betrayed; then he issues an order that causes him to be put into solitary. he gets respect from this; but he is now "Von Ryan" for the remainder of the film. the war ends; the prisoners revolt successfully and capture the Commandant. Then they have to move overland to escape, and"Von Ryan's" sparing of some prisoners costs lives. But it his great idea once they are captured and put aboard a train to be taken to imprisonment in Germany is to steal the train and head for safety elsewhere. They succeed; against all odds, even though he must kill an Italian officer's loyal betrayer, a beautiful woman; and by ruse, attack, feint, false messages and speed, they do what is necessary. Then as they head for Switzerland, the German planes attack. And at the last, Ryan runs after the train, the last of all--and becomes a legend the hard way. Music by Jerry Goldsmith, makeup by Ben Nye, cinematography by William H. Daniels , art direction by Hilyard B. Brown and John Martin Smith all under the direction of producer-director Mark Robson add up to a recipe for a first-rate color adventure film. As Ryan, Frank Sinatra is not entirely miscast and tries very hard, sensibly underplaying his role, matched every step of the way by Trevor Howard who mostly reacts and gives speeches about the way things ought to be done, very effectively. Edward Mulhare comes off Academy Award level in the film, and others such as John van Dreelin, Sergio Fantoni, Adolfo Celi as the Commandant, and Vito Scotti do well. Raffalla Carra is the girl Ryan must kill, Wolfgang Preiss, Brad Dexter, John Leyton and Richard Bakalyan are soldiers on one side or another. There are many exciting scenes provided, none moreso than Mulhare's impersonation of a German officer; the death of the girl, the final attacks on the train, several of the scenes set in the Stalag and the train's progress which is counterpoised many times to German language scenes of what their pursuers are doing; dialogue scenes lead here to action, action to reassessments, to challenges and to consequences. This is sometimes a slick film, but never a boring one, I suggest. Its characters are not developed as they would have been in a dramatic film; this is an adventure-level film with dramatic elements. And it is a good and occasionally thrilling ride, with the curious sense about it of a dream and a symbol both. Its theme is the courage to dare; and in the enigmatic Ryan, it finds an appropriate hero, a bit tarnished about the edges as a soldier but a first-rate result-getter nevertheless.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | German | Italian

Release Date:

23 June 1965 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Von Ryan's Express See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$5,760,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)| Stereo (DVD release)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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