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Repulsion (1965) Poster

(1965)

Trivia

Features the first depiction of female orgasm (sound only) to be passed by the British Board of Film Censors.
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This film, along with Rosemary's Baby (1968) and The Tenant (1976), forms a loose trilogy by Roman Polanski about the horrors of apartment/city dwelling.
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In his autobiography, Roman Polanski admitted that he and co-writer Gérard Brach came up with the film so as to have a commercial success which would then help them fund the making of Cul-de-sac (1966), a much more personal project for them.
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When Roman Polanski first announced this, he stated the actress he required would have to be "an angel with a slightly soiled halo".
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After unsuccessfully pitching the film to Paramount Pictures and British Lion Films, director Roman Polanski and producer Gene Gutowski, eventually received financing from Compton Pictures, a small distribution company that had been known primarily for its distribution of softcore pornography films.
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The Charlie Chaplin film Catherine Deneuve's coworker, Bridget, recommends is The Gold Rush (1925).
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Roman Polanski's first English-language film.
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Premiere voted this movie as one of "The 25 Most Dangerous Movies".
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The film was shot in black and white by Gilbert Taylor, who had recently worked on Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) and A Hard Day's Night (1964). Taylor photographed the apartments of female friends in Kensington for inspiration.
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The scene where Catherine Deneuve stumbles across the bridge and down the street was filmed at Hammersmith Bridge, London.
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This film is part of the Criterion Collection, spine #483.
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Helen's reference to La Dolce Vita (the sweet life) on the postcard is a clever nod to the actress playing Helen, Yvonne Furneaux, who was also in that film.
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Including among the "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die", edited by Steven Schneider.
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Catherine Deneuve claimed that in actuality, she and Carol have very different personalities.
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Maxwell Craig is seen here as a workman sitting next to Mike Pratt in the early sequence when Catherine Deneuve's character Carol crosses the road and Pratt requests Carol for sexual relations. He would later appear in the TV series UFO.
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