7.0/10
3,520
53 user 17 critic

Morituri (1965)

A war pacifist is blackmailed to pose as an SS officer and to disable the scuttling explosives on freighter carrying rubber cargo to be captured by the Allies.

Director:

Bernhard Wicki

Writers:

Werner Jörg Lüddecke (novel) (as Werner Joerg Luedecke), Daniel Taradash (screenplay)
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Nominated for 2 Oscars. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Marlon Brando ... Robert Crain
Yul Brynner ... Captain Mueller
Janet Margolin ... Esther Levy
Trevor Howard ... Colonel Statter
Martin Benrath ... Kruse
Hans Christian Blech ... Donkeyman
Wally Cox ... Dr. Ambach
Max Haufler Max Haufler ... Branner
Rainer Penkert Rainer Penkert ... Milkereit
William Redfield ... Baldwin
Oscar Beregi Jr. ... Admiral (as Oscar Beregi)
Martin Brandt ... Nissen
Charles De Vries Charles De Vries ... Kurz
Carl Esmond ... Busch
Martin Kosleck ... Wilke
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Storyline

A German living in India during World War II is blackmailed by the English to impersonate an SS officer on board a cargo ship leaving Japan for Germany carrying a large supply of rubber for tyres. His mission is to disable the scuttling charges so the captain cannot sink the ship if they are stopped by English warships. Written by Daniel Bruce <danbec@one.net.au>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

World War II, Espionage, adventure and human lives have never before been combined so explosively See more »

Genres:

Action | Drama | Thriller | War

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Colonel Statter looks at a painting in Crain's home, and Crain tells him that it's a Kirchner. Ernst Ludwig Kirchner was a German painter, and one of the founders of Die Brücke ("The Bridge"), an influential vanguard of Expressionist painters. In the 1930s, his art was labeled as "degenerate" by the Nazis, and many of his paintings were destroyed. In 1938, he committed suicide. See more »

Goofs

Esther's hairstyle is of the Sixties, not the war years. See more »

Quotes

Milkereit: [Saying out loud the message being relayed by the signal lamp from the submarine] We'll continue to observe radio silence until after transfer of prisoners.
Captain Mueller: [caught unawares] *What* transfer of prisoners?
Milkereit: Shall I send a reply, sir?
Captain Mueller: Yes. Tell them Captain Mueller just jumped overboard.
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User Reviews

 
Looks great. Proof Brando did great things in the 60's.
23 December 2003 | by Ben_CheshireSee all my reviews

If the plot is a little hard to follow at times, Morituri at least looks great. Fantastic black and white cinematography, which provides some great noirish moments, especially below-deck, and Marlon Brando, make this a very beautiful movie to look at. The 60's are generally thought of as Brando's "down period," between his giving up the part of Lawrence of Arabia and ending up being falsely blamed for the project he chose instead of it going over budget, Mutiny on the Bounty (1962), and his massive "comeback" with The Godfather in 1972 (by the way, Marlon's simple reason for his choice between the two projects, was he'd much prefer to be swimming in beautiful Tahiti for three months than stuck in a hot desert for three months!). Because of this myth, Brando afficionadoes seek out movies from this period and test how accurate a reflection of talent and ability public opinion and money-making is. I haven't yet seen all of them, but the example of Morituri suggests that there was no reason to suspect Brando's talents ever dimmed. Some projects he had no respect for, and clearly just walked through the part - but when he cared, and when the director could tell the difference between a "full" take and an empty one, Brando was electric. Morituri is an example where we see Brando at his best. His German accent in this is actually quite good - certainly better than his English accent - and it contains quite a few special Brando moments (like when he is discovered below-deck by someone who isn't aware he shouldn't be there). Jerry Goldsmith's (Omen) score is a highlight. Very Herrmann-esque.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

September 1965 (Austria) See more »

Also Known As:

Saboteur: Code Name Morituri See more »

Filming Locations:

Los Angeles, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$6,290,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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