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The Ipcress File (1965)

Passed | | Thriller | 2 August 1965 (USA)
Trailer
3:02 | Trailer
In London, a counter espionage Agent deals with his own bureaucracy while investigating the kidnapping and brainwashing of British scientists.

Director:

Sidney J. Furie

Writers:

Len Deighton (novel), W.H. Canaway (screenplay) (as Bill Canaway) | 1 more credit »
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Won 3 BAFTA Film Awards. Another 2 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Michael Caine ... Harry Palmer
Nigel Green ... Major Dalby
Guy Doleman ... Colonel H.L. Ross
Sue Lloyd ... Jean Courtney
Gordon Jackson ... Jock Carswell
Aubrey Richards Aubrey Richards ... Dr. Radcliffe
Frank Gatliff ... Bluejay
Thomas Baptiste ... Barney
Oliver MacGreevy Oliver MacGreevy ... Housemartin
Freda Bamford ... Alice
Pauline Winter Pauline Winter ... Charlady
Anthony Blackshaw ... Edwards
Barry Raymond Barry Raymond ... Gray
David Glover David Glover ... Chilcott-Oakes
Stanley Meadows ... Inspector Pat Keightley
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Storyline

Several leading Western scientists have been kidnapped only to reappear a fews days later. Unfortunately, each scientist has been brainwashed and is now completely useless. The British send Agent Harry Palmer to investigate. Palmer is surprised to be selected for such a mission (considering his past) and believes he has been chosen because he is expendable. Written by Dave Jenkins <david.jenkins@smallworld.co.uk>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Spy man, spy man, what do you see? "One murder! Two murders! And mine makes three!" See more »

Genres:

Thriller

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Harry Palmer is depicted as an accomplished cook, but when you see Palmer skillfully break a couple of eggs, the hands in the close-up belong to Len Deighton, author of the book on which this movie was based. Deighton was an accomplished cook and also wrote a comic strip about cooking for The Observer. The walls of Palmer's kitchen are full of these strips. See more »

Goofs

When Dalby meets Ross in his club, Ross's right hand is in the air on the long shot but holding the newspaper in the close-up. The position of his left hand changes between shots as well, with the fingers changing from pointing down to being horizontal. See more »

Quotes

Major Dalby: The Americans have put a tail on Palmer.
Colonel Ross: How very tiresome of them.
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Connections

Referenced in Phil Cool: Episode #1.1 (1992) See more »

Soundtracks

A Man Alone
Composed, Arranged and Conducted by John Barry
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User Reviews

Do a good bit of a lunch at your club do they?
7 April 2003 | by hugh1971See all my reviews

The best thing about this film is the fascinating period atmosphere. When this film was made, 1965, Britain, and British filmmaking, was exactly on the cusp between the old, class ridden, Imperial culture of films like 'Zulu', and the gritty, modern, realist school that began with films like 'Get Carter'.

In '65 Britain had a Labour government after a long period of Conservative rule, and sweeping changes were about to happen which would utterly change the face of British life. 'Ipcress' bridges the gap between these two eras.

On the one hand we have the upper-middle class army officers lunching at their clubs and strolling along in bowler hats with tightly furled umbrellas, and at the other extreme we have the way-out psychedelia of the interrogation chamber scene, and the grimy world of offices, warehouses, and men jumping out of vans that defined the TV and films of the 70s such as 'The Sweeney'.

In the middle somewhere is Harry Palmer, who rather than being working class, is classless. He has no discernable accent, dresses plainly, likes cooking and classical music and lives in nondescript surroundings. It is only his military rank, that of sergeant, that enables us to make any kind of judgement on his social status.

I think this is part of the enduring appeal of the film. Although the Dalbys of this world are long gone, Palmer would not be out of place in 2003, in fact the Palmers of this world are now the norm in many positions of British authority.

Overall a fascinating period piece but one which has worn well.


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English | Albanian

Release Date:

2 August 1965 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Ipcress File See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$750,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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