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Yesterday and Today: The Best Merch for Beatles Fans

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Related: 100 Greatest Beatles Songs, Ranked

On the heels of director Danny Boyle’s recent film Yesterday — the story about an alternative reality where the Beatles never existed — we rounded up some of the best Fab Four collectibles we could find. Thanks to the fact the Beatles did exist in this reality, there are plenty of awesome, epic and…
See full article at Rolling Stone »

The Beatles Movies That Never Happened

Once upon a time…or maybe twice…and on a personal note…I’ve been a Beatles fan as long as I can remember. Similarly, I’ve been a movie fanatic for almost as long (though not quite). So, at some point, I naturally started thinking about my favorite Beatle movie moments. Then, I started to ponder the moments that never actually happened. Now, I’m not suggesting that I was lost in some sort of drug-induced Sixties flashback, but rather I was thinking about the several unrealized film projects that the band never actually made.

Sure, A Hard Day’s Night (1964) is fantastic; Help! (1965) has its own unique charm by spoofing the then “new” James Bond style spy film; Yellow Submarine (1968) is sublime in its ground-breaking animated whimsy; and, finally, Magical Mystery Tour (1967) and Let It Be (1970) are pretty darn good celluloid time capsules. But, wouldn’t it have
See full article at CinemaNerdz »

Watch Himesh Patel Cover ‘Yesterday’ on ‘Kimmel’

Watch Himesh Patel Cover ‘Yesterday’ on ‘Kimmel’
Himesh Patel stars in Danny Boyle’s upcoming film Yesterday, a movie that supposes a world where The Beatles don’t exist. In the film, Patel’s Jack Malik gets famous pretending he’s the mastermind behind hits like “Hard Day’s Night” and “Hey Jude.” The British actor appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live in support of the movie to unveil his version of the 1965 classic “Yesterday.”

In the clip, Patel performs the track on guitar and vocals, stripping the tune back as a string section adds another level of emotion to the performance.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Tribeca Film Review: ‘I Want My MTV’

  • Variety
The first thing you want from a history of MTV is to get dunked in the hot-but-cool nostalgia of it, and the fast, fleet documentary “I Want My MTV” delivers those 1980s goods about as good as you can get. Here’s “Video Killed the Radio Star,” the novelty single by the Buggles that launched the channel on Aug. 1, 1981 — a tune that, in hindsight, sounds as sing-song catchy in its percolating bliss as a Divertimento by Mozart. Here are the five original VJs — shaggy Mark Goodman, earnest Alan Hunter, snarky Martha Quinn, jovial J.J. Jackson, and hipstery Nina Blackwood — fumbling around against a set that looks more like Wayne Campbell’s basement than a television studio, tossing off we’re-making-this-up-on-the-spot-and-we-know-it patter that became the casual formative version of “attitude.”

Here are those primitive early days when for every music video that was made with flair, like the S&M-flavored Old
See full article at Variety »

Tribeca Film Review: ‘Yesterday’

  • Variety
The Beatles wrote many of the greatest songs of all time, and they also wrote a lot of the greatest movie songs. To know that, all you have to do is see the title sequence of “A Hard Day’s Night,” which electrifies you from its opening Thrum!!!, or the Beatles blasting the sonic bliss of “I Should Have Known Better” from inside a train storage compartment, or the smoky sublimity of the “You’re Going to Lose That Girl” recording-studio sequence from “Help!,” or the melting psychedelia of the “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” fantasia from “Yellow Submarine,” or Paul gazing into the camera as he delivers the hymn-like rapture of the title song of “Let It Be.” The Beatles showed you, over and over, what a pop musical movie sequence could be, and that’s why you can go back to those movies — those scenes — again and again.
See full article at Variety »

Former Journey Singer Steve Perry Releases His First New Song in 24 Years (Listen)

  • Variety
Former Journey Singer Steve Perry Releases His First New Song in 24 Years (Listen)
It took nearly 25 years, but former Journey singer Steve Perry dropped a new single today,”No Erasin’” — a taster from his forthcoming new album, “Traces” which is due Oct. 5 on Fantasy Records.

Fittingly, the song begins with the line, “I know it’s been a long time comin’.”

In making the announcement, Perry said, “Putting 30 years into 10 songs has certainly been an emotional experience for me. I started writing and recording these songs with the creative freedom that I was the only one who would ever hear them. Along the way, I rediscovered my love for music. Each track represents traces of my past, but is also a hopeful look into the future. I invite you to listen with an open heart.” Perry was inducted with Journey into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame last year (pictured above).

Produced by Perry with co-producer Thom Flowers, “Traces” features nine new
See full article at Variety »

‘Yellow Submarine’ Restoration Posed Challenge for Team of Specialists

  • Variety
‘Yellow Submarine’ Restoration Posed Challenge for Team of Specialists
When it was first released in 1968 at the height of the pop psychedelic era, the Beatles’ animated feature “Yellow Submarine” was immediately hailed by audiences and critics alike as another Fab Four masterpiece. And while the band members were only tangentially involved in the production, the hugely influential result was a pioneering, surreal and visually stunning film. The movie was saturated with the group’s trademark humor and personality and propelled by classic Beatles songs, including the title Lennon-McCartney song as well as “Eleanor Rigby,” “WhenI’m Sixty-Four” and “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds.”

Variety chief film critic Owen Gleiberman questions whether there has “ever been an animated feature as deliriously infectious, as blissed out on its eye-candy surrealism, or as sheerly madly gorgeous as ‘Yellow Submarine.’”

And to celebrate the film’s 50th anniversary, a restored 4K version with remixed 5.1 stereo surround sound is being theatrically released this
See full article at Variety »

‘Yellow Submarine’ at 50: Why the Psychedelic Animated Beatles Movie Is Timeless

‘Yellow Submarine’ at 50: Why the Psychedelic Animated Beatles Movie Is Timeless
They aren’t sprinting through a narrow street, laughing and tumbling over one another as they’re trailed by what appear to be hundreds of rabid teenyboppers. Nor are they charming Ed Sullivan and the American press corps, or comically falling down together in the snow while locked arm in arm, or walking to the armored car that will take them out of Candlestick Park after their last public performance – we’re way past all of that now. And they aren’t bickering in a studio or playing the single
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘Yellow Submarine’: A Dazzling Revival Everyone Should See (Especially the New Leaders of Pixar)

  • Variety
‘Yellow Submarine’: A Dazzling Revival Everyone Should See (Especially the New Leaders of Pixar)
Just about every animated classic, from “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” to “Spirited Away,” from “Toy Story” to “Persepolis,” from “Fritz the Cat” to “Fantastic Mr. Fox,” hits a ruling visual style and sticks to it. But there was a moment 50 years ago when one movie cartoon got high, floating above the rules and over the cracked psychedelic rainbow.

Has there ever been an animated feature as deliriously infectious, as blissed out on its eye-candy surrealism, or as sheerly madly gorgeous as “Yellow Submarine”?

The Beatles’ celebrated cartoon feature, directed by the Canadian animator George Dunning (who had overseen the Beatles’ weekly cartoon series for ABC-tv), came out in 1968, and it’s remarkable to consider that in all the years since, no mainstream animated feature has come close to matching — or even trying to match — its majestically trippy pop-art dazzle. If “Yellow Submarine” is a movie you grew up with,
See full article at Variety »

Set Sail With The Beatles' 'Yellow Submarine' for Its 50th Anniversary (Exclusive)

Armed with their music and the most powerful weapon of all, love, The Beatles must stop the Blue Meanies from destroying everything near and dear to the people of Pepperland. Such is the premise of the animated movie Yellow Submarine, which, in celebration of its 50th Anniversary, is returning to select theaters for special showings. And joining it will be the making of book, It’s All in the Mind: Inside The Beatles’ Yellow Submarine, Vol. 2; and the graphic novel adaptation of the film from writer/artist Bill Morrison and Titan Comics. Back at the height of Beatlemania in the mid-1960s, the Fab Four signed a three-picture deal with United Artists, resulting in the box office (and soundtracks) hits A Hard Day’s Night (1964) and Help! (1965), after which their interest in a follow-up was virtually non-existent. Al Brodax, who had produced a Saturday morning animated series based on the
See full article at Closer Weekly »

How ‘Yellow Submarine’ Made The Beatles ‘Lovable’ Again

How ‘Yellow Submarine’ Made The Beatles ‘Lovable’ Again
Once upon a time — or maybe twice — there was a gloriously colorful and strange film called “Yellow Submarine.” The 1968 cartoon helped usher The Beatles out of an odd, hectic period for the band and would serve as a gateway for subsequent generations of Beatles fans to come.

When “Yellow Submarine” was released in the summer of 1968, the Beatles were bigger than Jesus. But things had gotten a little rocky within the group. Their longtime manager, Brian Epstein, had died the previous summer; they endured their first flop, the British TV film “Magical Mystery Tour,” at the end of that year; they alienated some fans with a trip to India to meditate with the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi in early 1968; and Lennon was heavily into LSD and, in October, would be arrested on drug possession charges with his new girlfriend Yoko Ono, whose constant presence was not always embraced by the band or its fans.
See full article at The Wrap »

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