5.7/10
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63 user 35 critic

Dr. Who and the Daleks (1965)

An eccentric inventor and his companions travel in his TARDIS to the Planet Skaro and battle the evil menace of the Daleks.

Director:

Gordon Flemyng

Writers:

Terry Nation (based on the B.B.C. television serial), Milton Subotsky (screenplay)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Peter Cushing ... Dr. Who
Roy Castle ... Ian
Jennie Linden ... Barbara
Roberta Tovey ... Susan
Barrie Ingham ... Alydon
Geoffrey Toone ... Temmosus
Michael Coles ... Ganatus
John Bown John Bown ... Antodus
Yvonne Antrobus Yvonne Antrobus ... Dyoni
Mark Petersen Mark Petersen ... Elyon
Ken Garady Ken Garady ... Thal
Nicholas Head Nicholas Head ... Thal
Mike Lennox Mike Lennox ... Thal (as Michael Lennox)
Jack Waters Jack Waters ... Thal
Virginia Tyler Virginia Tyler ... Thal
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Storyline

When Dr. Who shows his time machine TARDIS to the clumsy Ian, who is boyfriend of his granddaughter Barbara, he accidentally transport them and Dr. Who's granddaughter Susan to somewhere in space and time. They explore the spot and see a city; Dr. Who fakes a leak in the fluid and they go to the city to seek mercury to refill the component. They are captured by the Daleks and soon they learn that a war between Daleks and Thals has destroyed the planet. Further they are exposed to radiation and only the Thals have the antidote. The Daleks send Susan to find the cure and she meets the Thal Alydon that has the antidote and wants to negotiate with the Daleks to exchange for food. But the cruel Daleks want to destroy the Thals to rule the world. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The Fantastic, Amazing Daleks Are Here! See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

July 1966 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Doctor Who and the Daleks See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

£180,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Barrie Ingham and Geoffrey Toone also had later major roles in the TV series of Doctor Who: Ingham played Paris in "The Myth Makers" (1965) and Toone was Hepesh in "The Curse of Peladon" (1972). See more »

Goofs

Robert Jewell is wrongly credited as Robert Jewel. See more »

Quotes

Dr. Who: We've been working on TARDIS for many years. This is the final component. You are privileged, young man, to be the first visitor to our time and space machine. There. I can now set the controls for anywhere in time and space that we wish to go. When I push that lever, this room and everything in it will dissolve into their respective component electrical charges. We're all made of them! These charges will then be transferred in time and space and reassembled in their proper order and their ...
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Connections

Referenced in The Five(ish) Doctors Reboot (2013) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
An exercise in nostalgia
2 April 2008 | by neil-476See all my reviews

I have fond memories of seeing this at the cinema (a treat on a friend's birthday) when it first came out. I was a big Dr Who fan anyway as a 12 year old, and this big screen colour adaptation of the 2nd Dr Who serial and first Dalek story was just what the Doctor ordered.

It never occurred to me, as a 12 year old in 1965, that the Doctor was a mere human and not a Time Lord from Gallifrey, and that was because, at the time, he was a mere human and not a Time Lord from Gallifrey on TV, too. That particular wrinkle wasn't introduced until long after the first couple of Dalek TV series and the two movies.

That said, while the film brings back fond memories, and is particularly good to see in widescreen, it is very much a product of its time, and specifically targetted at its market - youngsters who were mad keen on Daleks. That market is not there any more. The movie shows its age, and doesn't stand up that well to today's demands. For all that, there's still a genuine sense of jeopardy involved, the principals play well, the production values are (for the time and the UK cinema industry) very high, and it remains good, colourful innocent fun.


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