5.1/10
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Gamera: The Giant Monster (1965)

Daikaijû Gamera (original title)
Not Rated | | Horror, Sci-Fi | 27 November 1965 (Japan)
Trailer
1:08 | Trailer
From out of the arctic comes a gigantic flying, fire-breathing turtle that sets its sights on destroying Tokyo.

Director:

Noriaki Yuasa

Writer:

Niisan Takahashi (screenplay) (as Fumi Takahashi)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Eiji Funakoshi ... Dr. Hidaka
Harumi Kiritachi Harumi Kiritachi ... Kyoko Yamamoto
Junichiro Yamashita ... Aoyagi (as Junichirô Yamashiko)
Yoshiro Uchida Yoshiro Uchida ... Toshio Sakurai
Michiko Sugata Michiko Sugata ... Nobuyo Sakurai
Yoshirô Kitahara Yoshirô Kitahara ... Mr. Sakurai
Jun Hamamura ... Professor Murase
Kenji Ôyama Kenji Ôyama ... Minister of Defense
Munehiko Takada Munehiko Takada ... Soviet Representative
Yoshio Yoshida ... Eskimo Chief
Jun Osanai Jun Osanai ... Chidori Maru Captain
Daihachi Kita Daihachi Kita ... Chidori Maru Navigator
Kazuo Mori Kazuo Mori ... Chidori Maru Radioman
Kôji Fujiyama Kôji Fujiyama ... U.S. Arctic Base Commander
Osamu Ôkawa Osamu Ôkawa ... U.S. Air Base Radar Technician
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Storyline

A nuclear explosion in the far north unleashes Gamera, the legendary flying turtle, from his sleep under the ice. In his search for energy, Gamera wreaks havoc over the entire world, and it's up to the scientists, assisted by a young boy with a strange sympathetic link to the monster, to put a stop to Gamera's rampage. Written by Jean-Marc Rocher <rocher@fiberbit.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Horror | Sci-Fi

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

There are conflicting reports as to the origin of Gamera. Masaichi Nagata, the producer of Rashomon (1950), claims he came up with the idea after seeing a turtle shaped cloud outside an airplane window. Others dispute this claim, Tomio Sagisu claimed that Daiei took one of the monster ideas he had for a half-hour kaiju TV show. There are even claims of a so-called "prevented turtle" who appear to woman at shrines near Daiei as well as of a turtle who harassed female bathers. See more »

Goofs

In the English language version, special effects director Yonesaburo Tsukiji is mistakenly credited as Yonesaburg Tsukiji. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
[English version]
Alex: Here we are. It looks wild, huh?
Catherine: You can say that again.
See more »

Alternate Versions

Not released in the USA until 1985, to home video and television, by Sandy Frank under the title GAMERA. To that day, the only way to (partially) see it was the movie Gammera the Invincible, which used the special effects footage from the original Japanese film but most scenes involving human actors were replaced by new ones featuring an American cast. The Sandy Frank version, one of his usual dubbing jobs, was the whole original Japanese footage except for the opening credits sequence, replaced by English translated credits superimposed over an image of moving ocean water. Another difference is that in the Frank dub the names of some characters are Americanized (i.e. Toshio is renamed Kenny). See more »

Connections

Referenced in Mystery Science Theater 3000: Gorgo (1998) See more »

User Reviews

 
enjoyable on its own terms, whatever those are
17 September 2007 | by winner55See all my reviews

It doesn't make sense to give this film a bad rating - but it really doesn't make sense to rate it at all.

Don't assume that means that this film is so ridiculous, it's beyond redemption... well, it IS ridiculous and beyond redemption; but it is certainly enjoyable on its own terms.

If this film is easy to misunderstand, it's because it's really difficult to say what 'it's own terms' really are. It begins clearly intending to compete with the successful Godzilla series; but somewhere about mid-way, it suddenly decides to be about a lonely young boy. In order to salvage its science-fiction credentials, it then comes up with an impossible solution to the Gamera threat to the human race - I can't tell you what it is, but it would take the entire assets of the developed nations of the world to pull off - it might be better to let the big turtle stalk around and just stay out from beneath his feet.

On top of all this wild nonsense, the American release print, which is the only one I know available, adds on some wonderful campy stuff, like the televised debate about the possible existence of the big turtle, and lowest-budgeted attempt to portray a meeting of the UN Security Council you are ever likely to see - even the one in the Adam West Batman movie looks spectacular in comparison.

There is no way to wrap your brain around this one, so don't bother. A guilty pleasure to the max. And one more important point in its favor - unlike most of the other '60s Gamera films, this one moves along at a fine pace and never drags.

So microwave some kettle corn and munch down - you deserve not to take life so seriously you can't enjoy a bit of fluff like this.


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Details

Country:

Japan

Language:

Japanese | English

Release Date:

27 November 1965 (Japan) See more »

Also Known As:

Gamera See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Daiei Studios See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

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