The Wednesday Play (1964–1970)
8.0/10
957
15 user 12 critic

Cathy Come Home 

Cathy loses her home, husband and eventually her child through the inflexibility of the British welfare system.

Director:

Ken Loach (as Kenneth Loach)

Writer:

Jeremy Sandford (story)
Reviews
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Carol White ... Cathy
Ray Brooks ... Reg
Winifred Dennis Winifred Dennis ... Mrs. Ward
Wally Patch Wally Patch ... Grandad
Adrienne Frame Adrienne Frame ... Eileen
Emmett Hennessy Emmett Hennessy ... Johnny
Alec Coleman Alec Coleman ... Wedding Guest
Geoffrey Palmer ... Property Agent
Gabrielle Hamilton Gabrielle Hamilton ... Welfare Officer
Phyllis Hickson Phyllis Hickson ... Mrs. Alley
Frank Veasey Frank Veasey ... Mr. Hodge
Barry Jackson ... Rent Collector
James Benton James Benton ... Man at Eviction
Ruth Kettlewell Ruth Kettlewell ... Judge
John Baddeley John Baddeley ... Housing Officer
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Storyline

Cathy loses her home, husband and eventually her child through the inflexibility of the British welfare system. Written by D.Giddings <darren.giddings@newcastle.ac.uk>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

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Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Producer Tony Garnett later said that the play "let everybody off the hook, (it) was not political enough, (it) was a nice, soft, liberal film, it didn't put the boot in where it should have done". See more »

Quotes

Cathy Ward: You don't care. You only pretend to care.
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Connections

Featured in What Lies Beneath (2008) See more »

Soundtracks

High Noon
(uncredited)
Music by Dimitri Tiomkin
Lyrics by Ned Washington
Performed by Doreen Herrington
See more »

User Reviews

 
Is Ken Loach the most depressed man in the world?
15 April 2007 | by Peter ElefantSee all my reviews

What to say about this one? Heartbreaking, bleak, hopeless take on unemployment and overpopulation in England. It's not overindulging, it's not constructed, it just is, which makes it even worse to watch.

Basically you'll be watching the slow disintegration of this young couple that falls in love and tries to start a family. What begins as a love story, ends up exposing a social security system, completely incapable of handling the overpopulation, or the people it affects.

It's depression in film form. But to Loach's great credit, the point, the punch of this movie, never feels strained. If you liked this (if you thought it was good that is), My Name is Joe could be next Loach film you should look into.


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

28 March 1969 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »

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