Ben Gazzara plays a successful lawyer who is told by his doctor in the first episode that he will die in one to two years. He decides to do all of the things, for which he has never had ... See full summary »
Reviews

Episodes

Seasons


Years



3   2   1  
1968   1967   1966   1965  
Nominated for 4 Golden Globes. Another 8 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Complete series cast summary:
...  Paul Bryan 85 episodes, 1965-1968
Edit

Storyline

Ben Gazzara plays a successful lawyer who is told by his doctor in the first episode that he will die in one to two years. He decides to do all of the things, for which he has never had time. The program becomes a series of plays in which he meets a wide variety of people from bums riding the rails, to gigolos, to orphans, and becomes a man who has little fear of death, and everything but time. Written by John Vogel <jlvogel@comcast.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

starring BEN GAZZARA as Paul Bryan: man on the move, with nothing to lose but himself! (season two) See more »

Genres:

Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

13 September 1965 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Alma de acero  »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(86 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Some sources claim that Ben Gazzara's character suffered from leukemia. However, in a 1998 interview conducted by television book writer Ed Robinson, Executive Producer Roy Huggins indicated that the affliction, from which "Paul Bryan" suffered, was never mentioned on the program, and does not exist. See more »

Quotes

Opening credits narrator: [season 3 opening credits] Paul Bryan, Attorney at Law, future full of promise. Until a medical examination reveals he has a short time to live, precious time, time to be used, time to crowd 30 years of living into one... or two.
See more »

Crazy Credits

During seasons one and two, Roy Huggins was credited as Executive Producer during the opening credits after the program's episode titles. During season three, for unknown reasons, Huggins was not clearly credited as Executive Producer. In addition, Huggins was nominated for an Emmy as Executive Producer for the show's final season. The end credits state the following: A Roncom Films-Roy Huggins Production. See more »

Connections

Spoofed in Get Smart: Hoo Done It (1966) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Drama "with a Gimmick" Showcased Ben Gazzara...
30 December 2003 | by See all my reviews

"Run for Your Life" was one of those shows that Johnny Carson loved to joke about, back in the sixties; with the premise that a wealthy 30-ish lawyer had a fatal disease with only one or two years left to live, when the show entered it's third season, did this mean the specialists were quacks, or that the hero's globe-trotting adventures invoke some 'miracle cure'?

The joking aside, the series' novel premise gave star Ben Gazzara an opportunity to display his well-respected dramatic skills (he'd created the role of Brick in "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" on Broadway, and, with Peter Falk, would make a major impact in John Cassavetes' innovative films of the sixties and seventies), and turn the routine plots into often engrossing character studies.

There could never be a truly 'happy' end to any episode; even when 'Paul Bryan' resolved the issues raised in a show, he could never enjoy the 'fruits' of his endeavors, or even promise to return to the people whose lives he'd changed. If he fell in love (which, naturally, happened), he had to either deny it, or pass the reciprocated love to someone else (unless the girl herself died), so 'bittersweet' was the best term to describe the show, a quality similar to "The Fugitive", as well.

As NBC required 'action' in their series, "Run for Your Life" had Bryan often "in harm's way", and each time he was treated by a doctor or hospital, there was the added tension of whether his exertions might accelerate his disease. Gazzara's Bryan was not trying to commit suicide, but was trying to live his remaining time to the fullest, so his anguish when facing risks had a very 'real' basis, and gave Gazzara some of his best series' moments.

Despite the 'backlot' feel of the 'international' locales (the show never went on location), and the casting of the same actors who appeared in many other Universal-produced series of the period, veteran producer Roy Huggins tried to keep each episode fresh and original, through the use of stock footage, music, and clever editing.

"Run for Your Life" was not a 'great' series, but was unconventional for it's time, and, as a showcase for Ben Gazzara, was definitely worth watching.


39 of 40 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 10 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Popular Sci-Fi Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular sci-fi movies and TV shows available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial