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Get Smart (TV Series 1965–1970) Poster

(1965–1970)

Trivia

When Don Adams was negotiating his salary, he had his choice between more money per week and no ownership stake in the show, or less money per week and part ownership. He chose the ownership deal and never regretted it.
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It is rumored that Agent 99 was originally supposed to be named Agent 69, but NBC censors deemed it to be too "sexually suggestive". According to Barbara Feldon, this is not true. Her character was originally to be named Agent 100 "because she was one hundred percent", but Buck Henry decided 99 sounded more feminine.
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Edward Platt suffered from chronic back pain, which is the reason why he does not appear in a few episodes, and why, in some episodes, is only seen sitting down.
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David Ketchum appeared in exactly thirteen episodes as Agent 13.
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When asked how he developed his trademark voice for Agent 86, Don Adams said that it came from watching "The Thin Man" movies starring William Powell and Myrna Loy. After hearing Powell repeatedly say, "Asta! Asta!" he decided to imitate his voice for the character of Maxwell Smart.
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In an episode of the final season, where Larabee has a much bigger role than in previous years, Max says to the Chief after a typical Larabee blunder, "People have often asked me if Larabee and I are related." Robert Karvelas, who played Larabee, was Don Adams' cousin.
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Barbara Feldon was two inches taller than Don Adams. In order to make it appear that Adams was taller than Feldon, he would either stand on a small platform, or Feldon would stoop down. Also, for most of the show's run, Feldon wore mostly flat shoes, and very rarely wore high heels.
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Barbara Feldon was initially reluctant to commit to the series. She refused to sign a traditional five-year contract, and signed for only four episodes. After filming the pilot, she agreed to commit to the series, but signed a three-year contract. After the third season, she agreed to sign for two more years.
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Talk show legend Johnny Carson makes cameo appearances twice during the show's run. Once as a train conductor, and again as a royal herald in a foreign King's court.
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CONTROL and KAOS were supposed to be acronyms, but Mel Brooks and Buck Henry never came up with anything for them to stand for.
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Don Adams originated Maxwell Smart's voice and catchphrase "Would you believe...?" while he was a cast member on The Bill Dana Show (1963).
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According to Buck Henry, Talent Associates Producer Daniel Melnick came up with the basic idea for the show. Melnick told Mel Brooks and Henry that he wanted a character based on the two most popular film franchises at the time: the James Bond and The Pink Panther film franchises.
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In 1965, before the show went on the air, the publicity firm of Rogers & Cowan sent a series of five sealed envelopes to America's top television critics. Each was stamped "Top Secret" and contained a vital message from Maxwell Smart. The first read: "Sssh!" The second provided instructions for deciphering the enclosed message embossed on an enclosed pin. The third required a "cigarette lighter or matches used judiciously" to reveal the invisible message. The fourth read: "Je was linker om iemand anders te nemen om je dit voor te laten lezen", which is Dutch for, "You would have been smarter to ask someone else to read this aloud for you". The fifth included a photograph of Max, 99, and Fang with their eyes blocked out with black rectangles, and a caption that read "A scene from ____ at ____ on ____".
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The series aired on two different networks during its run. When NBC cancelled it after four seasons, it was picked up by CBS, which aired its fifth and final season.
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Agent 99's real name is never revealed, not even when she marries Max, after which was is occasionally referred to as Mrs. Smart. In one episode, her name was said to be Susan Hilton. However, she later recanted and claimed it was an alias.
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"86" comes from an old slang term for refusing service to a customer.
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Though the chief's first name was Thaddeus, he also used the cover name Harold Clark in the final two seasons.
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Barbara Feldon (Agent 99) was married to Series Producer Burt Nodella from 1968 to 1979.
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The creators first submitted the series idea to ABC, with Tom Poston as Agent 86. When ABC rejected it, they brought it to NBC, which would only finance a pilot if the role was re-cast with Don Adams, whom they had under contract.
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Chief (Edward Platt) had an assistant named Larrabee. Larrabee was the name of Platt's role in North by Northwest (1959).
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In the final season, Max and 99 have twins, a boy and a girl. The boy is likely the individual who grows up to be Zach Smart in the later revival Get Smart (1995).
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The red convertible driven by Don Adams in the opening credits for the first two seasons is a 1965 Sunbeam Tiger Mark I, which came standard with a Ford 260 V8 engine. The car was used in several episodes throughout the first four seasons, though sometimes substituted by a very similar-looking Sunbeam Alpine with Tiger badging. A Volkswagen Karmann Ghia was used in the opening credits for the third and fourth seasons, but never used in any episode. For the fifth season, the show featured a 1969 Opel GT used in the opening credits, as well as the episodes for that season. Only used in the pilot episode, was an early 1960s Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet.
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Tony Randall and Orson Bean were also considered for Maxwell Smart.
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Agent 99 was named "most stylish secret agent" at the 2004 TV Land awards.
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During the fourth season, Chief had a 1968 Ford Shelby Mustang convertible that Maxwell Smart drove occasionally.
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Inspired in part by The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (1964). Barbara Feldon guest starred on the earlier series as an U.N.C.L.E. Agent.
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There was a comic book adaptation of the series published by Dell Comics that ran from 1966 to 1967. Some stories were drawn by the artist, Steve Ditko, co-creator of Spider-Man and Doctor Strange.
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The name "Starker" was pronounced "Shtakah", which is Yiddish for a large, stout, and typically muscular man.
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This show was the principal inspiration for Inspector Gadget (1983), of which the main character was voiced by Don Adams, and was also a bumbling and inept Agent. Also, some of the lines from this show, such as "Would you believe..." and "Sorry about that, Chief", were uttered by Gadget on occasions.
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King Moody auditioned for the role of Hymie. He later appeared as a double agent in an episode, before being cast in the role of Starker.
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Larabee's first name was never mentioned.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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