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Morelia: Bernardo Arellano Discusses Impulso Morelia’s ‘Serpent’s Paradise’

Morelia, Mexico — Impulso Morelia is a works in progress forum where nearly finished films are screened for an industry audience which are given the opportunity to ask questions and offer suggestions on ways to polish the film’s final cut.

The first picture screened at this year’s Impulso was Bernardo Arellano’s “Serpent’s Paradise.” The film then capped off the week by taking home the Estudios Churubusco Azteca Award, which will provides support of 200,000 Mexican pesos ($10,500) in post-production and Thx sound services.

Arellano is no stranger to festival success. In 2011 “Between Night and Day,” was in competition at San Sebastián’s Horizontes Latinos and the Warsaw and Guadalajara fests, and in 2014 his second feature “The Beginning of Time” took home best Latin American picture at Malaga, won at Beijing.

“Serpent’s Paradise” came to the Mexican festival this year looking to snag an international sales agent and festival premiere.

The film is
See full article at Variety - Film News »

An Endless Cycle: Basma Alsharif Discusses "Ouroboros"

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Basma Alsharif has garnered attention worldwide for her installations and shorts over the last few years. Her work invites the viewer to re-think the depiction of language, time and space, and to re-experience the understanding of creating images and telling stories.I interviewed the filmmaker about her feature debut Ouroboros, which will have its world premiere as part of the Signs of Life competition at the 70th Locarno Film Festival.Notebook: Could you comment on the process of creating this film as a mirror to your own experience and also as a bridge to your filmmaking ideas? Basma Alsharif: As a Palestinian in the Diaspora, I have watched and experienced the perpetual destruction of the Gaza Strip throughout the course of my life—as it has throughout my parents' lives and my grandparents' lives. With the privilege of distance coupled with the privilege of having access to visiting throughout my childhood into adulthood,
See full article at MUBI »

79 Movies to See Before You Die, According to the Dardenne Brothers

79 Movies to See Before You Die, According to the Dardenne Brothers
Any list of the greatest foreign directors currently working today has to include Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne. The directors first rose to prominence in the mid 1990s with efforts like “The Promise” and “Rosetta,” and they’ve continued to excel in the 21st century with titles such as “The Kid With A Bike” and “Two Days One Night,” which earned Marion Cotillard a Best Actress Oscar nomination.

Read MoreThe Dardenne Brothers’ Next Film Will Be a Terrorism Drama

The directors will be back in U.S. theaters with the release of “The Unknown Girl” on September 8, which is a long time coming considering the film first premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016. While you continue to wait for their new movie, the brothers have provided their definitive list of 79 movies from the 20th century that you must see. La Cinetek published the list in full and is hosting many
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Jeannette, The Childhood of Joan of Arc’

Cannes Film Review: ‘Jeannette, The Childhood of Joan of Arc’
We all know how Joan of Arc’s story ends: in a blaze of glory. But how did her 15th-century campaign to liberate France begin? That’s where Bruno Dumont’s “Jeannette, the Childhood of Joan of Arc” comes in, taking the early chapters of the future saint’s life — from her first religious vision to her decision to fight — and bringing them to life through song. Granted, it’s a glorious idea, though Dumont is hardly the director to do it, and the result feels outrageous on all accounts: a blasphemous assault on French history, religion, and the musical genre.

An avowed atheist, Dumont dedicated the early stretch of his career to making films that disavow the presence of God in a world dominated by brute human behavior, then surprised everyone three years ago by discovering his funny bone with the delightfully absurdist “Li’l Quinquin,” a bucolic murder
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Mark Reviews John Waters’ Multiple Maniacs [Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review]

From the opening of Multiple Maniacs when Mr. David introduces us to Lady Divine’s Cavalcade of Perversion are we being introduced to John Waters’ own perversion? And how long do we want to stay? Divine’s entrance is as an engorged Elizabeth Taylor bathed in shimmering white light furthering the early mystique of Divine and her Cavacade. From robbing to rosaries, movie posters to murder John Waters is “performing acts” as we have truly entered Waters’ World.

“Produced, directed, written, filmed, and edited by John Waters” – auteur: check. Multiple Maniacs is not a high-budget film and was certainly never screened before the hours of midnight in the 1970’s. Waters made the film for $5000 borrowed from his father also borrowing the land surrounding their house to set the film. During the making of his first film, Mondo Trasho, he was arrested by the police so the early scenes of Multiple Maniacs
See full article at CriterionCast »

Paul Greengrass’ Top 10 Films

Paul Greengrass has spent the past twenty-plus years crafting lean, energetic action films such as his Bourne entries — a franchise he returns to this Friday with Jason Bourne — and equally taut docudramas such as Captain Philips and United 93. His staging and editing of action has become a seminal staple of modern cinema, though it has proven hard to properly imitate as the coherence he often achieves is lost on his imitators. His films explore national paranoia and wounded heroes (often Matt Damon), while his style focuses on kinetic, intimate, and spur-of-the-moment action and storytelling.

Thanks to BFI‘s most recent Sight & Sound poll, Greengrass has compiled a list of his ten favorite films, many of which globe trot outside of the U.S. to everywhere from France (Godard), to Japan (Kurosawa), and Russia (Eisenstein), among others. There’s a clear connective thread between the French New Wave style of
See full article at The Film Stage »

Rotterdam 2016. The Streets, the Mountains, the Snow, and the Ocean

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The French New Wave did not invent the idea of exploring a city through the wanderings of a couple—F.W. Murnau suggest as much from the Fox studio backlot in Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans, and Luchino Visconti offered his own glorious fairy tale stroll of Cinecittà’s Venice in White Nights—but that movement certainly provided an invigorating, youthful inspiration to an emerging generation of international filmmakers to orient their cinema to the relationships close to them and to streets they know so well.Thus we see Catalonian director José María Nunes’s 1966 masterpiece Noche de vinto tinto (Red Wine Night), which begins with a young woman distraught when her boyfriend breaks a promised date and, going out into the night, she attaches herself to a failed Romeo. The character of their meeting encapsulates all the oneiric, irrational, partially romantic, partially despondent tenor of the evening of bar hopping that follows,
See full article at MUBI »

Notebook's 8th Writers Poll: Fantasy Double Features of 2015

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How would you program this year's newest, most interesting films into double features with movies of the past you saw in 2015?Looking back over the year at what films moved and impressed us, it is clear that watching old films is a crucial part of making new films meaningful. Thus, the annual tradition of our end of year poll, which calls upon our writers to pick both a new and an old film: they were challenged to choose a new film they saw in 2015—in theatres or at a festival—and creatively pair it with an old film they also saw in 2015 to create a unique double feature.All the contributors were given the option to write some text explaining their 2015 fantasy double feature. What's more, each writer was given the option to list more pairings, with or without explanation, as further imaginative film programming we'd be lucky to catch
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On the Anniversary of His Death, Watch Documentaries About and By Pier Paolo Pasolini

On November 2, 1975, the body of Pier Paolo Pasolini was found by a beach in Rome’s Ostia neighborhood. Being the result of a heavy beating and multiple run-overs by his own car, this death is so ignoble — and so mysterious; despite a conviction, the culprit has never really, truly been identified — that it casts a permanent pall over his legacy. (Worse yet, as one below video will show, that Pasolini was still working on Salò, a movie whose controversial status is only heightened by the murder.) Today marks the horrible occasion’s 40th anniversary, but it doesn’t necessitate mourning. If anything, now is a time to honor the man who always forced us to consider things we might not wish to acknowledge — our desires, our vices, our limits, our connections to art, and our relationship with the alternately beautiful and disgusting human body.

Embedded for your viewing pleasure, then,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Masters of Cinema Cast – Episode 39 – The Gospel According to St Matthew

We return with a look at The Gospel According to St Matthew and are joined with regular guest Hunter Duesing from The Midnight Movie Cowboys.

From Masters of Cinema:

Legendary director (and avowed atheist) Pier Paolo Pasolini’s The Gospel According to Matthew [Il vangelo secondo Matteo] is one of the great retellings of the story of Christ – a cinematic rendering (filmed by invitation from the Pope, no less) at once both passionate and poetic.

With stunning black-and-white photography, an eclectic soundtrack (Odetta, Bach, a Congolese mass, etc), and using a cast of non-professionals who voice dialogue drawn directly from scripture, The Gospel According to Matthew depicts the key events in the life of Christ, from immaculate conception to death on the cross.

Vaunted by the Vatican as one of its select few recommended films, acclaimed by the Archbishop of Canterbury as a “great film”, and revered by critics and audiences alike, Pasolini’s Oscar-,
See full article at CriterionCast »

FilmRise to Distribute Water Bearer’s Lgbt Movies

Film and TV distributor FilmRise has partnered with Water Bearer Films in a distribution deal for 125 titles from Water Bearer’s library of Lgbt-oriented movies, Variety has learned exclusively.

The deal includes home media, digital and TV. It includes Peter Hall’s adaptation of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” starring Helen Mirren and Judi Dench, and the films of Pier Paolo Pasolini, including “The Gospel According to St. Matthew,” “Oedipus Rex” and the documentary “Love Meetings.”

Other titles include the coming-of-age drama “Like a Brother”; Mark Rappaport’s documentary on gay Hollywood, “The Silver Screen: Color Me Lavender”; the romance “La Leon”; and “A Very Natural Thing.”

“We’re ecstatic to be distributing these incredible films from the Water Bearer library,” FilmRise CEO Danny Fisher said. “For decades, they have been instrumental in nurturing and promoting Lgbt-oriented filmmaking, from Pasolini to the New Queer Cinema, and we are honored to
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Daily | Cannes 2015 | Miguel Gomes’s Arabian Nights

Miguel Gomes's Arabian Nights "is not a literal adaptation of The Arabian Nights, it merely adopts its structure, its disposition, and—eventually—its sublime perspicacity," writes Little White Lies editor David Jenkins. "It comes across as a cross-processing of Buñuel's Phantom of Liberty, Pasolini's The Gospel According to St. Matthew and the films of inspirational Portuguese filmmakers, Antonio Reis and Margaret Cordeiro. But even that doesn't quite cover it." We've got the trailer and we're collecting reviews of all three volumes. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | Cannes 2015 | Miguel Gomes’s Arabian Nights

Miguel Gomes's Arabian Nights "is not a literal adaptation of The Arabian Nights, it merely adopts its structure, its disposition, and—eventually—its sublime perspicacity," writes Little White Lies editor David Jenkins. "It comes across as a cross-processing of Buñuel's Phantom of Liberty, Pasolini's The Gospel According to St. Matthew and the films of inspirational Portuguese filmmakers, Antonio Reis and Margaret Cordeiro. But even that doesn't quite cover it." We've got the trailer and we're collecting reviews of all three volumes. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Daily | Chytilová, Warhol, Pasolini

In today's roundup of news and views: Agata Pyzik for frieze on Vera Chytilová's Daisies; a history of censorship and the movies in Iran after the Islamic Revolution; Jonathan Rosenbaum on Alain Resnais and Chris Marker's Statues Also Die and Roberto Rossellini's Rome Open City (1945) plus a speech by Pere Portabella; Matt Connolly on Andy Warhol’s Vinyl, Fernando F. Croce on Pier Paolo Pasolini's Il vangelo secondo Matteo, Francine Prose on David Cronenberg's Maps to the Stars, Peter Hogue on Raoul Walsh, Danny King on James B. Harris, Todd Field's interview with Sissy Spacek, Michael Tully's with James Gray—and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | Chytilová, Warhol, Pasolini

In today's roundup of news and views: Agata Pyzik for frieze on Vera Chytilová's Daisies; a history of censorship and the movies in Iran after the Islamic Revolution; Jonathan Rosenbaum on Alain Resnais and Chris Marker's Statues Also Die and Roberto Rossellini's Rome Open City (1945) plus a speech by Pere Portabella; Matt Connolly on Andy Warhol’s Vinyl, Fernando F. Croce on Pier Paolo Pasolini's Il vangelo secondo Matteo, Francine Prose on David Cronenberg's Maps to the Stars, Peter Hogue on Raoul Walsh, Danny King on James B. Harris, Todd Field's interview with Sissy Spacek, Michael Tully's with James Gray—and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

The Definitive ‘What the F**k?’ Movies: 20-11

20. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1998)

Directed by: Terry Gilliam

So…drugs, right? Based on Hunter S. Thompson’s 1971 novel of the same title, Fear and Loathing stars Johnny Depp and Benicio del Toro as Raoul Duke and Dr. Gonzo, respectively. The pair is heading to Sin City, speeding through the Nevada desert, under the influence of mescaline. From there, the film is series a bizarre hallucinations seen through the eyes of Duke. So, we jump from hotel room to hotel room, all of the action a blur of what is happening and what really isn’t. Throughout the course of the film, Duke and/or Gonzo ingest the following drugs: mescaline, sunshine acid, diethyl ether, LSD, cocaine, and adenochrome (probably more). Duke – who is a Thompson stand-in – is supposed to be writing an article before heading back to Los Angeles, but tends to get sidetracked quite a bit. In
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Watch: First Trailer For Abel Ferrara's 'Pasolini' Starring Willem Dafoe

Abel Ferrara has always been known for creating characters and stories that delve into  extreme human behaviour, but his last couple of films have concerned events that he did not have to dream up. This summer, the filmmaker unveiled "Welcome To New York," the fictionalized tale of former Imf chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn, and now, just a couple of months later, Ferrara is in Venice where he's premiering "Pasolini," a feature about controversial, slain filmmaker Pier Paolo Pasolini. And a pretty great first trailer for the film has arrived. Vacillating between English, Italian and French, this looks to be a respectful and quite beautiful look at the director who brought "Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom" and "The Gospel According To St. Matthew" to cinemas. The movie will focus on the events surrounding Pasolini's murder: while a male prostitute initially confessed to the crime, he later said the act was coerced via.
See full article at The Playlist »

Killing of Italian Director Pier Paolo Pasolini to Be Investigated in ‘La Macchinazione’

Killing of Italian Director Pier Paolo Pasolini to Be Investigated in ‘La Macchinazione’
Rome – The still-mysterious 1975 murder of Pier Paolo Pasolini, the Italian filmmaker, poet, and novelist known for “The Gospel According to Matthew” and “Salò – or the 120 Days of Sodom,” among other works, will get yet another cinematic treatment in Italian director David Grieco’s “La Macchinazione,” which started shooting today in Rome.

Grieco’s pic on the leadup to Pasolini’s killing comes shortly after Abel Ferrara shot his “Pasolini” pic in Rome, with Willem Dafoe in the title role. That pic is now reportedly in post.

Grieco, who worked with Pasolini as a thesp in his “Theorema,” before becoming a journalist and, more recently, a helmer, is claiming he will shed new light on the final months in Pasolini’s life. The visionary Italian cultural figure, considered a towering figure of contemporary European cinema, was murdered on on All Soul’s Day Nov. 2, 1975, when he was run over by his
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Variety Critics Pick the Best Films of 2014 (So Far)

Variety Critics Pick the Best Films of 2014 (So Far)
To say that our top three critics don’t always see eye-to-eye would be an understatement, but they can all agree on at least one thing: “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is one of Wes Anderson’s best movies, and one of the strongest entries in a year that has so far offered no shortage of cinematic excellence. Also mentioned by at least one critic: a steamy gay-cruising thriller, a hotly debated biblical epic, and two staggeringly ambitious magnum opuses that clocked in at more than four hours apiece. There will be many more hours (and weeks, and months) of moviegoing to come before they have their final say on the year in movies, but at the moment, 2014 is off to an excellent start.

Here, listed in alphabetical order, are our critics’ picks for the best films released theatrically from January to June 2014:

The Grand Budapest Hotel

Re-reading my Variety review of “Moonrise Kingdom,” I found the line, “While (Wes) Anderson is essentially a miniaturist, making dollhouse movies about meticulously appareled characters in perfectly appointed environments, each successive film finds him working on a more ambitious scale.” His latest is the apotheosis of that aesthetic — a nested series of stories as complex and intricately detailed as fine Swiss clockwork, given soul by the great Ralph Fiennes.

How to Train Your Dragon 2

Between this and “The Lego Movie,” we’ve been spoiled by great animation this year. My expectations were sky-high for the follow-up to DreamWorks cartoon coming-of-ager, and writer-director Dean DeBlois exceeded them, delivering a sequel with integrity, one that respects and expands upon the original while aging the characters five years — a rarity in a medium where Bart Simpson has spent the last 25 years repeating Mrs. Krabappel’s fourth-grade class.

Locke

What an exhilarating experiment: Using just one actor (Tom Hardy), one location (a moving BMW) and a series of phone calls as his script, writer-director Steven Knight has crafted a gripping character-driven drama. It’s the polar opposite of all the comicbook movies hogging screens these days, not simply for its lack of visual effects and spandex suits, but because “Locke” recognizes that a flawed human being is infinitely more interesting than a superhero.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Definitive Religious Films: 10-1

And here we are. The day after Easter and we’ve reached the top of the mountain. While compiling this list, it’s become evident that true religious films just aren’t made anymore (and if they are, they are widely panned). That being said, religious themes exist in more mainstream movies than ever, despite there being no deliberate attempts to dub the films “religious.” Faith, God, whatever you want to call it – it’s influenced the history of nations, of politics, of culture, and of film. And these are the most important films in that wheelhouse. There are only two American films in the top 10, and only one of them is in English.

courtesy of hilobrow.com

10. Andrei Rublev (1966)

Directed by Andrei Tarkovsky

A brutally expansive biopic about the Russian iconographer divided into nine chapters. Andrei Rublev (Anatoly Solonitsyn) is portrayed not as a silent monk, but a motivated artist working against social ruin,
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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