6.8/10
296
18 user 3 critic

Smokescreen (1964)

| Crime, Drama, Mystery | 1964 (UK)
A fastidious insurance assessor investigates a potential case of insurance fraud in Brighton and uncovers a murder.

Director:

Jim O'Connolly (as Jim O' Connolly)

Writer:

Jim O'Connolly (story and screenplay) (as Jim O' Connolly)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Peter Vaughan ... Roper
John Carson ... Trevor Bayliss
Yvonne Romain ... Janet Dexter
Gerald Flood ... Graham Turner
Glynn Edwards ... Inspector Wright
John Glyn-Jones John Glyn-Jones ... Player
Sam Kydd ... Hotel Waiter
Deryck Guyler ... Station Master (as Derek Guyler)
Penny Morrell Penny Morrell ... Helen - Turner's Secretary
David Gregory David Gregory ... Pete, The Smudger
Jill Curzon Jill Curzon ... June
Barbara Hicks ... Miss Breen
Bert Palmer Bert Palmer ... Barman
Tom Gill Tom Gill ... Reception Clerk
Edward Ogden Edward Ogden ... Police Sergeant
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Storyline

When a blazing car goes over the cliff to the east of Brighton an insurance investigator is sent to the coast to poke around. As the driver had recently taken out life insurance, suspicions mount when no body can be found. The wife who would benefit from the policy, the business partner who has financial troubles, and the guy who sold the policy and fancies the wife are all in the frame. Written by Jeremy Perkins {J-26}

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

independent film | See All (1) »

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Mystery

Certificate:

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Did You Know?

Goofs

A running joke in the film is that both the main character and his insurance company are mean with expenses, and yet they put him up at The Grand Hotel in Brighton - the most expensive one in the town even in 1964. See more »

Quotes

[Roper has been sitting in the hotel bar, eating the free crisps that they provide, but not ordering anything to drink. Finally Helen arrives]
Barman: She's arrived. Now he's *sure* to buy something.
Hotel Waiter: You want to bet? He's liable to order whisky and water - without the whisky.
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User Reviews

 
Barely seen comic thriller
2 May 2015 | by Leofwine_dracaSee all my reviews

SMOKESCREEN is a rather endearing little British thriller with a strong comic flavour to allow it to stand out from the rest. Although it has the same low budget, ensemble cast feel as many other films from Butcher's Film Studios, it's the comic angle - which centres around the central character's miserliness - which makes it special.

The storyline is rather familiar, but the Brighton locations give it an edge. The dependable Peter Vaughan plays an insurance investigator who investigates the death of a man who died when his burning car went over the cliffs. To this end, he's teamed up with a youthful John Carson (PLAGUE OF THE ZOMBIES) as his assistant and must get to grips with the dead man's wife, played by the glamorous Yvonne Romain (CURSE OF THE WEREWOLF). Meanwhile, familiar faces from British movies like Gerald Flood and Sam Kydd regularly appear.

SMOKESCREEN comes across as a rather genteel whodunit, playing out like a simple murder mystery with a big 'reveal' at the climax. All aspects of the film are ordinary apart from the comic streak, which is very well handled and genuinely funny. It's this comedy that makes SMOKESCREEN worth watching.


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

1964 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

L'accident d'auto See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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