7.0/10
5,870
51 user 20 critic

Send Me No Flowers (1964)

Approved | | Comedy, Drama, Romance | 14 October 1964 (USA)
A hypochondriac believes he is dying and makes plans for his wife which she discovers and misunderstands.

Director:

Norman Jewison

Writers:

Julius J. Epstein (screenplay) (as Julius Epstein), Norman Barasch (based upon the play by) | 1 more credit »
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1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Rock Hudson ... George
Doris Day ... Judy
Tony Randall ... Arnold
Paul Lynde ... Mr. Akins
Hal March Hal March ... Winston Burr
Edward Andrews ... Dr. Morrissey
Patricia Barry ... Linda
Clint Walker ... Bert
Clive Clerk ... Vito
Dave Willock ... Milkman Ernie
Aline Towne ... Cora
Helene Winston ... Commuter
Christine Nelson ... Nurse
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Storyline

At one of his many visits to his doctor, hypochondriac George Kimball mistakes a dying man's diagnosis for his own and believes he only has about two more weeks to live. Wanting to take care of his wife Judy, he doesn't tell her and tries to find her a new husband. When he finally does tell her, she quickly finds out he's not dying at all (while he doesn't) and she believes it's just a lame excuse to hide an affair, so she decides to leave him. Written by Leon Wolters <wolters@strw.LeidenUniv.nl>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

...just SEND me! See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

George refers to Green Hills, the cemetery where he purchases three plots, as "a Levittown of the hereafter". This reference, likely to be lost on modern audiences and certainly on foreign ones, is to four communities of that name, built by Levitt and Sons, a building firm. These communities, built after the Second World War to address the housing shortage, were noted for the mass production of the suburbs and the homogeneity of the housing designs. The most famous Levittown community is in Nassau County, New York. See more »

Goofs

The Doris Day character fills a wastebasket with pill bottles in the bathroom, then goes to a window and dumps them on the Rock Hudson character. She clearly empties the basket then, seconds later, she dumps more on him without ever going back to refill the wastebasket. See more »

Quotes

George Kimball: What kind of pills are they?
Dr. Morrissey: You wouldn't know if I told you. Just take them. Take the pills.
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Crazy Credits

Opening credits prologue: "The desire to take medicine is perhaps the greatest feature which distinguishes man from animals." Sir William Osler See more »


Soundtracks

Send Me No Flowers
Lyrics by Hal David
Music by Burt Bacharach
Recorded by Doris Day
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User Reviews

 
Doris & Rock & Tony!!
3 November 1998 | by Karen L. DemmySee all my reviews

Doris Day, Rock Hudson and Tony Randall together make up a hilarious comedy trio. Rock Hudsons character is a hypocondriac (sp?) and mistakenly believes he is dying. He shares this news with Tony Randall's character and together plan his funeral and plan for Doris Day's character's future (She is his wife in the movie). Well scene after scene is so funny. I loved everything about the movie and it is one of my top 10 films of all times. I have it taped and watch it over and over. It is fantastic for a bad mood day, it will perk you right up!


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Italian

Release Date:

14 October 1964 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Send Me No Flowers See more »

Filming Locations:

Universal City, California, USA See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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