7.0/10
4,039
25 user 38 critic

Scorpio Rising (1963)

A gang of Nazi bikers prepares for a race as sexual, sadistic, and occult images are cut together.

Director:

Kenneth Anger
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

Photos

Learn more

More Like This 

Short | Horror
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

Experimental short, featuring strobe-like erotic imagery with several shots of the Rolling Stones in performance and an original synthesizer score by Mick Jagger.

Director: Kenneth Anger
Stars: Kenneth Anger, Bobby Beausoleil, Bill Beutel
Short | Fantasy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

Egyptian gods summons the angel Lucifer - in order to usher in a new occult age.

Director: Kenneth Anger
Stars: Kenneth Anger, Bobby Beausoleil, Donald Cammell
Short | Fantasy | Horror
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

A Slavonic Mass by Leos Janácek plays as historical figures, biblical characters, and mythical creatures gather in the pleasure dome. Aphrodite, Lilith, Isis, Kali, Astarte, Nero, Pan, and ... See full summary »

Director: Kenneth Anger
Stars: Samson De Brier, Marjorie Cameron, Joan Whitney
Fireworks (1949)
Short | Drama | Horror
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

Depicts a dream sequence about the brutal rape and torture of Anger himself (as a teenager) by a group of sailors on the street (after trying to pick one of them up).

Director: Kenneth Anger
Stars: Kenneth Anger, Gordon Gray, Bill Seltzer
Rabbit's Moon (1950)
Short | Drama | Fantasy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

Pierrot waxes romantic, entranced by the moon. Harlequin appears and bullies him, then uses a magic lantern to project an image of Columbine. Pierrot tries to court the illusory Columbine ... See full summary »

Director: Kenneth Anger
Stars: Claude Revenant, André Soubeyran, Nadine Valence
Short | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

A man in tight jeans buffs his car to the strains of "Dream Lover".

Director: Kenneth Anger
Puce Moment (1949)
Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

A soundtrack plays folk rock as a woman prepares, at noon, to take her Borzois for a walk. She goes through her dresses, all 1920s style flapper gowns, holding them one at a time, shaking ... See full summary »

Director: Kenneth Anger
Stars: Yvonne Marquis
Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

A man dressed in an elegant period dress wanders through the water gardens at the Villa d'Este.

Director: Kenneth Anger
Stars: Carmilla Salvatorelli
Short | Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.6/10 X  

A independent director is faced with artistic difficulty when he asks his actresses to show nudity.

Director: George Kuchar
Stars: Donna Kerness, George Kuchar, Stella Kuchar
Report (1967)
Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

A compilation of selected bits of archival footage put to a narration of news reports describing the day President John F. Kennedy was assassinated.

Director: Bruce Conner
Magick Lantern Cycle (Video 2009)
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.4/10 X  
Director: Kenneth Anger
Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

Set in a leper colony in the north of Iran, The House is Black juxtaposes "ugliness", of which there is much in the world as stated in the opening scenes, with religion and gratitude.

Director: Forugh Farrokhzad
Stars: Forugh Farrokhzad, Ebrahim Golestan, Hossein Mansouri
Edit

Cast

Uncredited cast:
Ernie Allo Ernie Allo ... Joker (uncredited)
Bruce Byron Bruce Byron ... Scorpio (uncredited)
Frank Carifi Frank Carifi ... Leo (uncredited)
Steve Crandell Steve Crandell ... Blondie (uncredited)
Johnny Dodds Johnny Dodds ... Kid (uncredited)
Bill Dorfman Bill Dorfman ... Back (uncredited)
Nelson Leigh ... Jesus Christ (archive footage) (uncredited)
John Palone John Palone ... Pinstripe (uncredited)
Barry Rubin Barry Rubin ... Fall Guy (uncredited)
Johnny Sapienza Johnny Sapienza ... Taurus (uncredited)
Edit

Storyline

An army of gay/nazi bikers make their engines roar and ride the way to pain/pleasure as sexual and sadistic symbols are intercut into the dazing chaos and rhythmic experiences of this underground film by cult director Anger. Written by <cl_navarro@infonie.fr>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

From the underground - the original and wildest film of the Hell's Angels cult!

Genres:

Short | Music

Certificate:

See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

10 October 1969 (Denmark) See more »

Also Known As:

Scorpio Rising See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$16,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Puck Film Productions See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The church scenes were filmed inside an old church next to the Brooklyn garage where the party was taking place. The church building had been abandoned and was being demolished, and Anger got into it, with his camera, through a broken door. Scorpio's climbing on the altar during the "I Will Follow Him" sequence, delivering an excited political rant, and kicking old prayer-books and hymnals off the railing and to the floor, was all Bruce Byron's idea. The scene during the "Torture" sequence of a young man having his trousers and underwear pulled off, and a full bottle of mustard squeezed onto his naked abdomen, was the club initiation of a new member - having mustard rubbed over the groin and testicles, which caused a burning sensation but was not permanently harmful. See more »

Connections

Featured in Magick Lantern Cycle (2009) See more »

Soundtracks

(Love Is Like a) Heat Wave
(uncredited)
Written by Eddie Holland, Brian Holland and Lamont Dozier
Performed by Martha & The Vandellas
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Anger's orgy (and Bobby Vinton).

Scorpio Rising marks the beginning of the mix-tape approach to film-making, the technique of adding texture, flow, counter-point to images by over-laying them with a soundtrack of pop songs. Kenneth Anger takes this technique to its limit right from the start, eschewing dialogue, narrative and everything else in favor of a thirty-minute greatest-hits medley wedded to a chaotic assemblage of pictures having to do with some gay-Nazi-anarchists engaged in all manner of rebellious behavior, from reading comic books to smearing mustard on a fat guy's stomach and tearing his pants off. The result is a bizarre fusion of the innocent and the profane, the quaintness of yesterday's Elvis/Bobby Vinton hits alongside the amateurish depravity and two-bit spectacle of Anger's underground opus.

Despite its reputation as a sort of counter-culture landmark, the movie seems largely irrelevant, a museum piece commemorating the excesses of '60s cult movie-making. It consists primarily of badly-lit home-movies of some nameless, faceless leather-fetishists posing like the most slovenly male-models you can remember, then going to some degraded costume-ball that degenerates into the sort of orgiastic hi-jinks that were a staple of "controversial" sixties cinema. For kicks, Anger keeps cutting in little snippets from a silent movie about Jesus, demonstrating a grammar-school-level sense of how to shock middle-brow audiences. This is avant-gardism at its most obnoxiously pointless, the deliberate mingling of opposing elements (bubbly pop tunes over random sexual carnage, cross-cutting between a gay-Nazi orgy and shots of the Last Supper) for the purpose of suggesting all sorts of potential meanings, none of which have been sufficiently thought-out.

Anger is so concerned with creating an intense experience that he forgets anything he might've known about film technique and simply wallows in his own fanatical, vaguely Satanic weirdness. Yet despite the film's sloppiness, it occasionally points the way toward what later, better filmmakers would do with the director's indisputably pioneering idea. The fusion of pop-music and pop-image (see the Layla sequence in Goodfellas; bits of Easy Rider; much of Tarantino) can lead to a sense of electricity, a heightening, where a moment can come to summarize the whole of the film texturally. The first glimmers of this galvanizing effect can be felt for a second here-and-there in Scorpio Rising, but either Anger didn't understand what he was on to, or didn't care. As so often happens in experimental film, the pioneer has the inspiration but lacks the expertise, the know-how necessary to employ the technique in a meaningful way. The little ripples of potential energy never amount to anything for Anger, who winds up coming across like Roger Corman without the movie-making acumen.


6 of 21 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 25 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed