6.7/10
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35 user 3 critic

Of Human Bondage (1964)

Approved | | Drama | 22 October 1964 (UK)
Trailer
2:35 | Trailer
A medical student becomes obsessed with his faithless lover.

Directors:

Ken Hughes (as Kenneth Hughes), Henry Hathaway | 1 more credit »

Writers:

Bryan Forbes (screenplay), W. Somerset Maugham (novel)
Reviews
Nominated for 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Kim Novak ... Mildred Rogers
Laurence Harvey ... Philip Carey
Robert Morley ... Dr. Jacobs
Siobhan McKenna ... Nora Nesbitt
Roger Livesey ... Thorpe Athelny
Jack Hedley ... Griffiths
Nanette Newman ... Sally Athelny
Ronald Lacey ... 'Matty' Mathews
Olive White Olive White ... Griffith's Girlfriend
Norman Smythe Norman Smythe ... Cadaver Room Attendant
David Morris David Morris ... Young Phillip Carey
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Storyline

Medical student Philip fall in love with Mildred, a waitress. Although she is a flirt, they have a love affair. But when Philip is told about her constant infidelity, they break up. Mildred quits her job and becomes a prostitute. But Philip is still in love with her. Written by Mattias Thuresson

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

HE SWORE HE'D NEVER TOUCH HER AGAIN ... AND THEN SHE WHISPERED HIS NAME AND HE WAS LOST ... See more »

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In his autobiography "A Divided Life", Bryan Forbes states that Henry Hathaway didn't like Kim Novak, treated her shamefully and fought to have her replaced, before he walked off the film. Forbes goes on to say that Hathaway "was unpleasant to underlings and lacked any subtlety as a director". See more »

Goofs

Although set in 1915 or thereabouts, Kim Novak sports the same tousled bouffant she wore in her contemporary films throughout the Sixties. See more »

Connections

Version of Of Human Bondage (1934) See more »

Soundtracks

Mildred Theme
Written by Ron Goodwin
Performed by David Rose And His Orchestra
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User Reviews

 
Not Bette Davis, but sometimes that's a *good* thing!
29 August 2002 | by MissGirlFridaySee all my reviews

It is unfortunate that the 1934 version of this film has become the precedent by which all following adaptations seemed to be judged. This version does not try to imitate the "classic" and is an entirely different animal (making up for many of the flaws in the original).

Whereas Bette Davis portrayed Mildred as an over-the-top shrew, Kim Novak gave her an almost childlike naivety. It is not that Mildred wants purposely to hurt men but rather that she simply does not know how to behave better. Novak's interpretation gives Mildred the much needed humanity that was absent in the first version. Since Mildred now has genuine moments of kindness, it is much easier to see how Philip (Laurence Harvey) becomes obsessed with her.

Harvey, however, is greatly miscast in this film. As a crippled young man who likes art and helping people through medicine, Philip has a great deal of sensitivity (as seen through Leslie Howard's performance in the original). But Harvey, the actor who relished in being unlikable, is completely unable to deliver this. He fared much better in grimy roles ("Walk on the Wild Side," "Darling") and so he is only convincing in the scenes where he yells and slaps Mildred. (Given the reports that Harvey and Novak loathed each other, it is easy to see why these scenes are the most convincing). He is terrible, however, at looking smitten.

Performances aside, this version is refreshingly modern. Rather than glaze over the seedier bits to appease the censors, you will actually hear words like `whore' and `syphilis.' The final scenes are quite touching too, thanks in part to Novak's humility (she truly looks decrepit towards the end). The score cascades a little too loud and often though in all the pivotal scenes and this version would have benefited greatly from a more realistic approach.

This is a must see if you are a fan of the story and Kim Novak. Somerset Maugham supposedly adored Novak's interpretation of Mildred and it truly is a refreshing take on Of Human Bondage.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

22 October 1964 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

W. Somerset Maugham's of Human Bondage See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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