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4 user 6 critic

The Monster of the Opera (1964)

Il mostro dell'opera (original title)
A theater troupe's young, energetic leader has secured an old theater in which to produce his new production. The theater's elderly caretaker urges the group to leave at once. A vampire is ... See full summary »

Director:

Renato Polselli

Writers:

Renato Polselli (story), Ernesto Gastaldi (story) | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Marco Mariani Marco Mariani ... Sandro (as Marc Marian)
Giuseppe Addobbati ... Stefano (as John McDouglas)
Barbara Hawards Barbara Hawards ... Giulia
Alberto Archetti Alberto Archetti ... Achille (as Albert Archet)
Carla Cavalli Carla Cavalli ... Aurora
Aldo Nicodemi Aldo Nicodemi ... Man (as Boris Notarenko)
Jody Excell Jody Excell ... Yvette
George Arms George Arms
Gaby Black Gaby Black
Romy von Simon Romy von Simon
Erich Schonbrunner Erich Schonbrunner
Christine Martin Christine Martin
Liz Poitel Liz Poitel ... (as Lia Poitel)
Milena Vukotic ... Carlotta
Olga Jala Olga Jala
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Storyline

A theater troupe's young, energetic leader has secured an old theater in which to produce his new production. The theater's elderly caretaker urges the group to leave at once. A vampire is awakened and discovers that one of the troupe is the reincarnation of the woman who he once loved. Written by Dean Harris

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Horror

User Reviews

Celluloid insanity of the mind-boggling kind!
26 October 2011 | by melvelvit-1See all my reviews

When a dance troupe begins rehearsing in an opera house that's been closed for many years, Stefano, an aristocratic vampire in black tie & tails, suddenly appears and, whaddaya know, the lead dancer's a dead ringer for his lost love. That horror cliché gets turned on its head, however, because this bloodsucker lusts only for revenge on the adulteress who buried him alive centuries before. There's lots of neck-biting but no blood as the dapper demon chases the scantily-clad chorines through corridors and catacombs when he's not poking them with a pitchfork or making them dance in a trance. Stefano also tries feeding a few to his vampire brides chained up in the dungeon before he's finally brought to heel by having his portrait burned and face torched. Most of the shapely babes run around in baby-doll pajamas and there's even some lesbianism in this no-budget nightmare from director Renato Polselli, a delightfully prurient "auteur" who's also got DELIRIUM, THE TRUTH ACCORDING TO Satan, and REVELATIONS OF A PSYCHIATRIST ON THE WORLD OF SEXUAL PERVERSION to answer for. Stefano looks a bit like Christopher Lee when he hisses or laughs maniacally and the movie's even got a few atmospheric moments thanks to the black & white photography and spooky old opera house. Mexican monster movies have nothing on Italy's "Golden Age of Horror" when it comes to celluloid insanity of the mind-boggling kind, let me tell you.


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Details

Country:

Italy

Language:

Italian

Release Date:

30 June 1964 (Italy) See more »

Also Known As:

Vampire of the Opera See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono
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