6.6/10
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6 user

A Message to Gracias (1964)

Sylvester Cat has caught and eaten every messenger the Mexican revolutionary mice send to General Gracias. So, Speedy Gonzales is summoned to outwit and outrun Sylvester and reach the ... See full summary »

Director:

Robert McKimson

Writer:

John W. Dunn (story) (as John Dunn)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Mel Blanc ... Speedy Gonzales / Sylvester / El Supremo / Mice (voice)
Roger Green Roger Green ... Manuel - Mice (voice)
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Storyline

Sylvester Cat has caught and eaten every messenger the Mexican revolutionary mice send to General Gracias. So, Speedy Gonzales is summoned to outwit and outrun Sylvester and reach the General with an important message, which turns out to be a birthday greeting! Written by Kevin McCorry <mmccorry@nb.sympatico.ca>

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

8 February 1964 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The title is a pun on "A Message to Garcia", the title of an essay by Elbert Hubbard and of two movie features (1916 & 1936). See more »

Connections

Spoofs A Message to Garcia (1936) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Ernest Borgnine as a mouse
17 December 2007 | by lee_eisenbergSee all my reviews

Speedy Gonzales, on the verge of becoming the top Warner Bros. cartoon star (as they retired most of the characters), starred in Robert McKimson's "A Message to Gracias". This one has Speedy getting hired to deliver a letter to a revolutionary general - who looks like a mouse version of Ernest Borgnine - after Sylvester eats the other messengers. You can probably guess what sorts of things Speedy does to Sylvester.

This isn't exactly related, but I would like to talk about why Warner Bros. closed its animation department in 1963. The Looney Tunes were products of vaudeville-style entertainment. This type of humor was becoming old-school by the Kennedy era, and members of the baby boom were starting to come of age. So, WB closed its animation department. I don't really know why Friz Freleng established a new studio and sold cartoons to WB. Granted, I like Looney Tunes cartoons as much as the next person, but anyone can see that they were starting to lose steam by this point. This cartoon is OK in a pinch.


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