7.0/10
6,839
80 user 60 critic

Kiss Me, Stupid (1964)

Approved | | Comedy, Romance | 22 December 1964 (USA)
Jealous piano teacher Orville Spooner sends his beautiful wife, Zelda, away for the night while he tries to sell a song to famous nightclub singer Dino, who is stranded in town.

Director:

Billy Wilder

Writers:

Billy Wilder (screenplay), I.A.L. Diamond (screenplay) | 1 more credit »

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Dean Martin ... Dino
Kim Novak ... Polly the Pistol
Ray Walston ... Orville
Felicia Farr ... Zelda
Cliff Osmond ... Barney
Barbara Pepper ... Big Bertha
Skip Ward ... Milkman (as James Ward)
Doro Merande ... Mrs. Pettibone
Bobo Lewis Bobo Lewis ... Waitress
Tom Nolan ... Johnnie Mulligan (as Tommy Nolan)
Alice Pearce ... Mrs. Mulligan
John Fiedler ... Rev. Carruthers
Arlen Stuart Arlen Stuart ... Rosalie Schultz
Howard McNear ... Mr. Pettibone
Cliff Norton ... Mack Gray
Edit

Storyline

Dino, the charming and lecherous Las Vegas singer, stops for gas on his way to Hollywood in Climax, Nevada. The oily gas station attendant is Barney Millsap, a would-be lyricist who writes pop songs with Orville Spooner, the local piano teacher. By disabling Dino's car, Barney contrives a scheme to have Dino sing one of their songs on an upcoming TV special. To entertain Dino, Barney contacts the village tart, Polly, employing her to pretend to be Orville's wife, Zelda, for a night. She doesn't like Dino, but does love being Orville's surrogate wife. Dino goes to a bar, where he meets the real Zelda, and they spend the night together while Polly spends it with Orville. Written by alfiehitchie

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

This picture is for adults only See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Romance

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Crooner Dino is played by Dean Martin, in a role where he essentially is playing himself. Dino is asked at one point in the film what he thinks of the new rock group The Beatles, and he replies in a derogatory manner, with the script imitating Martin's feelings about the band in real life. Dino is then told that they are the new sound and that Dino's sound is obsolete. Ironically, and in reality, soon after the filming of this movie began, Martin recorded his soon-to-be signature song, "Everybody Loves Somebody Sometime," which knocked The Beatles' "A Hard Days' Night" single from the Billboard #1 spot in August 1964, one month after filming wrapped on this movie. Martin therefore became the first easy-listening performer to achieve a #1 Billboard single after The Beatles arrived in America, and did this by usurping the Beatles themselves from the top chart position. See more »

Goofs

After Orville's wife digs under his sweatshirt for a pen while Johnny is playing the piano, the sound of the piano distorts as if the sound tape slowed down for a second. See more »

Quotes

Orville J. Spooner: If it weren't for Venetian blinds, it'd be curtains for us...
See more »

Alternate Versions

The American version is 2 minutes longer than the European version, Dean Martin complains of a back injury, Zelda massages it, he falls asleep. In the European version, Zelda and Dean are kissing and it is more likely they will make love. The next scene is the same in both versions with Zelda waking up naked and Dean has left the trailer. See more »

Connections

Version of Wife for a Night (1952) See more »

Soundtracks

'S Wonderful
(uncredited)
Music by George Gershwin
Lyrics by Ira Gershwin
Performed by Dean Martin
(in the opening scenes)
See more »

User Reviews

About the Songs in This Film
27 December 2001 | by fordraffSee all my reviews

I just want to add a note here about the songs that the third-rate composer and lyricist, played by Ray Walston and Cliff Osmond, "wrote" in this movie. Hold on! The three songs that are heard in this film were written by none other than George and Ira Gershwin. The music for "Sophia" was intended for but not used in the Gershwin's 1937 show "Shall We Dance?" "I'm a Poached Egg" draws on music intended for their 1930 show "Girl Crazy" and lyrics intended for their 1937 show "A Damsel in Distress." The music for "All the Livelong Day" dates back to 1921. This has been recorded by Ella Fitzgerald, though I don't know on what CD it appears. Anyone can find the interesting details about these songs and complete lyrics, including some not used in the film, on pages 382-385 of "The Complete Lyrics of Ira Gershwin" published by Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., 1993.


11 of 13 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 80 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

22 December 1964 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Kiss Me, Stupid See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$3,500,000 (estimated)

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$8,869
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page

We've Got Your Streaming Picks Covered

Looking for some great streaming picks? Check out some of the IMDb editors' favorites movies and shows to round out your Watchlist.

Visit our What to Watch page



Recently Viewed